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dc.contributor.authorKhanna, Pankaj
Droxler, André W.
Nittrouer, Jeffrey A.
Tunnell, John W. Jr.
Shirley, Thomas C.
dc.date.accessioned 2017-11-15T14:12:53Z
dc.date.available 2017-11-15T14:12:53Z
dc.date.issued 2017
dc.identifier.citation Khanna, Pankaj, Droxler, André W., Nittrouer, Jeffrey A., et al.. "Coralgal reef morphology records punctuated sea-level rise during the last deglaciation." Nature Communications, 8, (2017) Springer Nature: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-017-00966-x.
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1911/98825
dc.description.abstract Coralgal reefs preserve the signatures of sea-level fluctuations over Earth’s history, in particular since the Last Glacial Maximum 20,000 years ago, and are used in this study to indicate that punctuated sea-level rise events are more common than previously observed during the last deglaciation. Recognizing the nature of past sea-level rises (i.e., gradual or stepwise) during deglaciation is critical for informing models that predict future vertical behavior of global oceans. Here we present high-resolution bathymetric and seismic sonar data sets of 10 morphologically similar drowned reefs that grew during the last deglaciation and spread 120 km apart along the south Texas shelf edge. Herein, six commonly observed terrace levels are interpreted to be generated by several punctuated sea-level rise events forcing the reefs to shrink and backstep through time. These systematic and common terraces are interpreted to record punctuated sea-level rise events over timescales of decades to centuries during the last deglaciation, previously recognized only during the late Holocene.
dc.language.iso eng
dc.publisher Springer Nature
dc.rights This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder.
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.title Coralgal reef morphology records punctuated sea-level rise during the last deglaciation
dc.type Journal article
dc.citation.journalTitle Nature Communications
dc.citation.volumeNumber 8
dc.identifier.digital Coralgal_reef_morphology_records
dc.type.dcmi Text
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-017-00966-x
dc.identifier.pmcid PMC5648809
dc.identifier.pmid 29051488
dc.type.publication publisher version
dc.citation.articleNumber 1046


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This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder.