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dc.contributor.authorZhang, Rui
Cohan, Alexander
Biazar, Arastoo Pour
Cohan, Daniel S.
dc.date.accessioned 2017-11-14T18:08:22Z
dc.date.available 2017-11-14T18:08:22Z
dc.date.issued 2017
dc.identifier.citation Zhang, Rui, Cohan, Alexander, Biazar, Arastoo Pour, et al.. "Source apportionment of biogenic contributions to ozone formation over the United States." Atmospheric Environment, 164, (2017) Elsevier: 8-19. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.atmosenv.2017.05.044.
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1911/98795
dc.description.abstract Vegetation is the leading emitter of volatile organic compounds (VOC), a key ingredient for ozone formation. The contribution of biogenic VOC (BVOC) emissions to regional ozone formation needs better quantification so that air quality regulators can effectively design emission control strategies. One of the key uncertainties for modeling BVOC emissions comes from the estimation of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) reaching canopy. Satellite insolation retrieval data provide an alternative to prognostic meteorological models for representing the spatial and temporal variations of PAR. In this study, biogenic emission estimates generated with the MEGAN and BEIS biogenic emissions models using satellite or prognostic PAR are used to examine the contribution of BVOC to ozone in the United States. The Comprehensive Air Quality Model with Extensions (CAMx) is applied with Ozone Source Apportionment Technology (OSAT) and brute force zero-out sensitivity runs to quantify the biogenic contributions to ozone formation during May through September 2011. The satellite PAR retrievals are on average lower than modeled PAR and exhibit better agreement with SCAN and SURFRAD network measurements. Using satellite retrievals instead of modeled PAR reduces BEIS and MEGAN estimates of isoprene by an average of 3%–4% and 9%–12%, respectively. The simulations still overestimate observed ground-level isoprene concentrations by a factor of 1.1 for BEIS and 2.6 for MEGAN. The spatial pattern of biogenic ozone contribution diagnosed from OSAT differs from the brute force zero-out sensitivity results, with the former more smoothly distributed and the latter exhibiting peak impacts near metropolitan regions with intense anthropogenic NOx emissions. OSAT tends to apportion less ozone to biogenics as BVOC emissions increase, since that shifts marginal ozone formation toward more NOx-limited conditions. By contrast, zero-out source apportionment of ozone to biogenics increases with BVOC emissions. OSAT simulations with BEIS show that BVOCs typically contribute 10–19% to regional ozone concentrations at nonattainment receptor sites during episode days.
dc.language.iso eng
dc.publisher Elsevier
dc.rights This is an author's peer-reviewed final manuscript, as accepted by the publisher. The published article is copyrighted by Elsevier.
dc.title Source apportionment of biogenic contributions to ozone formation over the United States
dc.type Journal article
dc.citation.journalTitle Atmospheric Environment
dc.subject.keywordBiogenic emissions
Photosynthetically active radiation (PAR)
Ozone Source Apportionment Technology (OSAT)
CAMx
Ozone
Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES)
dc.citation.volumeNumber 164
dc.identifier.digital ATMENV-D-17-00094R2_clean_version
dc.type.dcmi Text
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.atmosenv.2017.05.044
dc.type.publication post-print
dc.citation.firstpage 8
dc.citation.lastpage 19


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