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dc.contributor.advisor Boyer, Dominic
dc.creatorJohnson, Robert
dc.date.accessioned 2017-08-25T13:42:18Z
dc.date.available 2017-08-25T13:42:18Z
dc.date.issued 2017
dc.identifier.citation Johnson, Robert. "The Call of Higher Duty: How the Economy of Patriotism Extends from Real Civilians to Virtual Soldiers." Undergraduate thesis, Rice University, 2017. https://hdl.handle.net/1911/97385.
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1911/97385
dc.description Anthropology Capstone Final Paper
dc.description.abstract This project explores how military first-person shooter videogames serve as cultural artifacts grounded within the economy of patriotism. Essentially, the economy of patriotism is the system of exchange in which civilians are attempting to repay patriotic indebtedness that is enabled by perceptions of soldierly sacrifice, that forces conformity to and propagates an idealized patriotic narrative of sacrifice that is at odds with the real experiences of soldiers. Due to their crafted narrative’s mirroring of real civilian perception of soldierly duty, these videogames not only serve as part of these economic exchanges but extend them into virtual worlds. Focusing on the single-player modes within three recent Call of Duty titles, I explore first how these narrative simulations/simulated narratives invoke the sacrificial mythology of soldiers of the civilian public. Secondly, I detail how Call of Duty videogames expand experiences of the economy of patriotism. Ultimately, I bring attention to how these games may contribute to the civilian-military divide
dc.format.extent 44 pp
dc.language.iso eng
dc.publisher Rice University
dc.rights Copyright is held by author
dc.subjectcivil-military divide
soldier
videogame
virtual narrative
economy of patriotism
gaming culture
militarization
dc.title The Call of Higher Duty: How the Economy of Patriotism Extends from Real Civilians to Virtual Soldiers
dc.identifier.digital Johnson-Thesis-2017
dc.type.genre Thesis
thesis.degree.department Anthropology
thesis.degree.discipline Social Sciences
thesis.degree.grantor Rice University
thesis.degree.level Undergraduate
dc.type.dcmi Text
dcterms.accessRights restricted


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