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dc.contributor.authorCamley, Brian A.
Zimmermann, Juliane
Levine, Herbert
Rappel, Wouter-Jan
dc.date.accessioned 2017-08-21T14:34:15Z
dc.date.available 2017-08-21T14:34:15Z
dc.date.issued 2016
dc.identifier.citation Camley, Brian A., Zimmermann, Juliane, Levine, Herbert, et al.. "Collective Signal Processing in Cluster Chemotaxis: Roles of Adaptation, Amplification, and Co-attraction in Collective Guidance." PLoS Computational Biology, 12, no. 7 (2016) Public Library of Science: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pcbi.1005008.
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1911/97365
dc.description.abstract Single eukaryotic cells commonly sense and follow chemical gradients, performing chemotaxis. Recent experiments and theories, however, show that even when single cells do not chemotax, clusters of cells may, if their interactions are regulated by the chemoattractant. We study this general mechanism of “collective guidance” computationally with models that integrate stochastic dynamics for individual cells with biochemical reactions within the cells, and diffusion of chemical signals between the cells. We show that if clusters of cells use the well-known local excitation, global inhibition (LEGI) mechanism to sense chemoattractant gradients, the speed of the cell cluster becomes non-monotonic in the cluster’s size—clusters either larger or smaller than an optimal size will have lower speed. We argue that the cell cluster speed is a crucial readout of how the cluster processes chemotactic signals; both amplification and adaptation will alter the behavior of cluster speed as a function of size. We also show that, contrary to the assumptions of earlier theories, collective guidance does not require persistent cell-cell contacts and strong short range adhesion. If cell-cell adhesion is absent, and the cluster cohesion is instead provided by a co-attraction mechanism, e.g. chemotaxis toward a secreted molecule, collective guidance may still function. However, new behaviors, such as cluster rotation, may also appear in this case. Co-attraction and adaptation allow for collective guidance that is robust to varying chemoattractant concentrations while not requiring strong cell-cell adhesion.
dc.language.iso eng
dc.publisher Public Library of Science
dc.rights This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.title Collective Signal Processing in Cluster Chemotaxis: Roles of Adaptation, Amplification, and Co-attraction in Collective Guidance
dc.type Journal article
dc.citation.journalTitle PLoS Computational Biology
dc.contributor.org Center for Theoretical Biological Physics
dc.citation.volumeNumber 12
dc.citation.issueNumber 7
dc.identifier.digital Collective_Signal_Processing_Cluster_Chemotaxis
dc.type.dcmi Text
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pcbi.1005008
dc.identifier.pmcid PMC4930173
dc.identifier.pmid 27367541
dc.type.publication publisher version
dc.citation.articleNumber e1005008


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This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.