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dc.contributor.authorSplinter, David
Bryant, Victoria
Diamond, John W.
dc.date.accessioned 2016-10-05T19:49:50Z
dc.date.available 2016-10-05T19:49:50Z
dc.date.issued 2010
dc.identifier.citation Splinter, David, Bryant, Victoria and Diamond, John W.. "Income Volatility and Mobility: U.S. Income Tax Data, 1999-2007." (2010) James A. Baker III Institute for Public Policy of Rice University: http://www.bakerinstitute.org/research/income-volatility-and-mobility-us-income-tax-data-1999-2007/.
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1911/91700
dc.description.abstract How do earnings volatility and mobility impact different income groups? We describe household earnings volatility by the full distribution of percent earnings changes and contrast measures of relative and absolute mobility using a panel of U.S. income tax returns from 1999 to 2007. While earnings volatility looks similar across most of the income distribution, we find more volatility among the bottom quintile of households, mostly from earnings gains, and more volatility among the top one percent, mostly from earnings losses. Large earnings gains persist more for the bottom quintile and large losses persist more for households higher up the income distribution. In contrast to typical findings of lower relative mobility among the bottom and top quintiles, we find higher absolute earnings mobility among households at the extremes of the distribution.
dc.language.iso eng
dc.publisher James A. Baker III Institute for Public Policy of Rice University
dc.relation.urihttp://www.bakerinstitute.org/research/income-volatility-and-mobility-us-income-tax-data-1999-2007/
dc.subjectincome mobility
income volatility
income inequality
income distribution
dc.title Income Volatility and Mobility: U.S. Income Tax Data, 1999-2007
dc.type Research paper
dc.type.dcmi Text


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