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dc.contributor.authorMama, Scherezade K.
Li, Yisheng
Basen-Engquist, Karen
Lee, Rebecca E.
Thompson, Deborah
Wetter, David W.
Nguyen, Nga T.
Reitzel, Lorraine R.
McNeill, Lorna H.
dc.date.accessioned 2016-06-06T16:48:22Z
dc.date.available 2016-06-06T16:48:22Z
dc.date.issued 2016
dc.identifier.citation Mama, Scherezade K., Li, Yisheng, Basen-Engquist, Karen, et al.. "Psychosocial Mechanisms Linking the Social Environment to Mental Health in African Americans." PLoS ONE, 11, no. 4 (2016) Public Library of Science: e0154035. http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0154035.
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1911/90446
dc.description.abstract Resource-poor social environments predict poor health, but the mechanisms and processes linking the social environment to psychological health and well-being remain unclear. This study explored psychosocial mediators of the association between the social environment and mental health in African American adults. African American men and women (n = 1467) completed questionnaires on the social environment, psychosocial factors (stress, depressive symptoms, and racial discrimination), and mental health. Multiple-mediator models were used to assess direct and indirect effects of the social environment on mental health. Low social status in the community (p < .001) and U.S. (p < .001) and low social support (p < .001) were associated with poor mental health. Psychosocial factors significantly jointly mediated the relationship between the social environment and mental health in multiple-mediator models. Low social status and social support were associated with greater perceived stress, depressive symptoms, and perceived racial discrimination, which were associated with poor mental health. Results suggest the relationship between the social environment and mental health is mediated by psychosocial factors and revealed potential mechanisms through which social status and social support influence the mental health of African American men and women. Findings from this study provide insight into the differential effects of stress, depression and discrimination on mental health. Ecological approaches that aim to improve the social environment and psychosocial mediators may enhance health-related quality of life and reduce health disparities in African Americans.
dc.language.iso eng
dc.publisher Public Library of Science
dc.rights This is an open access article, free of all copyright, and may be freely reproduced, distributed, transmitted, modified, built upon, or otherwise used by anyone for any lawful purpose. The work is made available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication.
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/
dc.title Psychosocial Mechanisms Linking the Social Environment to Mental Health in African Americans
dc.type Journal article
dc.contributor.funder University Cancer Foundation
dc.contributor.funder Duncan Family Institute through the Center for Community-Engaged Translational Research
dc.contributor.funder Ms. Regina J. Rogers Gift: Health Disparities Research Program
dc.contributor.funder Cullen Trust for Health Care Endowed Chair Funds for Health Disparities Research
dc.contributor.funder Morgan Foundation Funds for Health Disparities Research and Educational Programs
dc.contributor.funder Center for Energy Balance in Cancer Prevention and Survivorship, Duncan Family Institute for Cancer Prevention and Risk Assessment
dc.contributor.funder National Cancer Institute
dc.citation.journalTitle PLoS ONE
dc.citation.volumeNumber 11
dc.citation.issueNumber 4
dc.type.dcmi Text
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0154035
dc.identifier.grantID R25T CA057730 (National Cancer Institute)
dc.identifier.grantID P30 CA016672 (National Cancer Institute)
dc.type.publication publisher version
dc.citation.firstpage e0154035


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