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dc.contributor.advisor Todd, Anderson
dc.creatorJones, Jerry Ben
dc.date.accessioned 2016-04-22T21:57:10Z
dc.date.available 2016-04-22T21:57:10Z
dc.date.issued 1964
dc.identifier.citation Jones, Jerry Ben. "The aged in community planning." (1964) Master’s Thesis, Rice University. https://hdl.handle.net/1911/89476.
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1911/89476
dc.description.abstract The living-forms of America's older citizens bespeak their ironic position in American life. Institutional forms of living present the aged as people rejected from society, disfranchised, unable to relate to the community as a whole. In addition, the American city is enmical to the older person and newer cities, when oriented toward human beings at all, are often designed for school-age children. This thesis proposes principles by which the older population can become a natural part of community life. Planning for the older population begins with a natural age-distribution, rather than the overconcentration of the retirement community, or the paucity of older citizens in suburban areas. Small groupings of the aged are utilized to afford the needed relationship with age-peers, and dispersal within the community is used to avoid the stigma of age-grouping. Pedestrian orientation centering on a commercial and residential mall allows the older residents of existing residential areas access to a space of some vitality and social import, where needed facilities such as clinics and shopping are available to the pedestrian. High-rise apartments at one end and main pedestrian goals at the other give movement through the central space and the mall's semi-enclosed residential groups. Functional and visual heterogeny of buildings, human to and fro, spatial variations, profile change, and level change have been utilized to provide variety, and islands of quietness, inner-directedness of planning, pedestrian scale, and retention of existing buildings offers familiarity to the older resident. The older person's children are encouraged to visit in the non-institutional environment, and medical facilities are available to the older resident by pedestrian access. Throughout the scheme, the independent household is used as the only expression of autonomy for the older individual. By such planning principles the aged can more fully participate in community life, and be represented as autonomous and worthwhile members of the population.
dc.format.extent 131 pp
dc.language.iso eng
dc.title The aged in community planning
dc.type Thesis
dc.identifier.digital RICE0506
dc.type.material Text
thesis.degree.department Architecture
thesis.degree.discipline Architecture
thesis.degree.grantor Rice University
thesis.degree.level Masters
thesis.degree.name Master of Architecture
dc.format.digitalOrigin reformatted digital
dc.identifier.callno Thesis Arch. 1964 Jones


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