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dc.contributor.advisor Brotzen, Franz R.
dc.creatorLoesch, Herbert William
dc.date.accessioned 2016-04-21T12:01:53Z
dc.date.available 2016-04-21T12:01:53Z
dc.date.issued 1966
dc.identifier.citation Loesch, Herbert William. "Observation of dislocations in molybdenum." (1966) Master’s Thesis, Rice University. https://hdl.handle.net/1911/89217.
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1911/89217
dc.description.abstract Single crystals of molybdenum were strained in direct shear on (110) planes along the [111] direction. Crystals were sheared to approximately 5, 10, 20, and 40 percent shear strain at 195°K, 300°K, and 373°K, and to 2 and 6 percent shear strain at 78°K. Specimens taken from the (110) shear plane were examined in transmission electron microscopy. The dislocation structure was examined at each strain and temperature increment, and measurements of the dislocation density and the density of jogs on primary screw dislocations were made. The results indicated that: (1) The dislocation density of molybdenum single crystals deformed in shear increases with strain at all temperatures investigated except 300°K. (2) This increase in p was linear, and as the deformation temperature is lowered, the rate of increase is accelerated. (3) The density of jogs on primary screw dislocations varies with strain and temperature much as does the dislocation density. (4) Conservative motion of jogs on screw dislocations becomes appreciable above 300°K. (5) The ease and scale of cross-slip of screw dislocations increases with increasing temperature. (6) The amount of secondary slip in crystals oriented for direct shear on (110) planes increases as deformation temperature decreases. (7) At l95°K and 300°K, the proportion of edge dislocation length to screw dislocation length increases as strain and tangling increase. No definite conclusion was reached on the dislocation mechanism controlling the flow stress.
dc.format.extent 118 pp
dc.language.iso eng
dc.title Observation of dislocations in molybdenum
dc.identifier.digital RICE0254
dc.type.genre Thesis
dc.type.material Text
thesis.degree.department Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science
thesis.degree.discipline Engineering
thesis.degree.grantor Rice University
thesis.degree.level Masters
thesis.degree.name Master of Science
dc.format.digitalOrigin reformatted digital
dc.identifier.callno Thesis M.E. 1966 LOESCH


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