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dc.contributor.authorLopez, David S.
Fernandez, Maria E.
Cano, Miguel Angel
Mendez, Claudia
Tsai, Chu-Lin
Wetter, David W.
Strom, Sara S.
dc.date.accessioned 2016-01-29T18:44:40Z
dc.date.available 2016-01-29T18:44:40Z
dc.date.issued 2014
dc.identifier.citation Lopez, David S., Fernandez, Maria E., Cano, Miguel Angel, et al.. "Association of Acculturation, Nativity, and Years Living in the United States with Biobanking among Individuals of Mexican Descent." Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, 23, no. 3 (2014) American Association for Cancer Research: 402-408. http://dx.doi.org/10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-13-0747.
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1911/88266
dc.description.abstract Background: Biobanking is the collection of human biospecimens (tissues, blood, and body fluids) and their associated clinical and outcome data. Hispanics are less likely to provide biologic specimens for biobanking. The purpose of this study was to investigate the association of acculturation, nativity status, and years living in the United States with participation in biobanking among individuals of Mexican descent. Methods: Participants were 19,212 adults of Mexican descent enrolled in an ongoing population-based cohort in Houston, TX. Participants were offered the opportunity to provide a blood, urine, or saliva sample for biobanking. Acculturation was assessed with the bidimensional acculturation scale for Hispanics and scores were categorized into モlow acculturation,ヤ モbicultural,ヤ and モhigh-acculturation.ヤ Results: After multivariable adjustment, we found an increased likelihood of participation in biobanking among individuals classified as モbiculturalヤ as compared with モhighly acculturatedヤ individuals [OR, 1.58; 95% confidence intervals (CI), 1.10ヨ2.26]. The associations of nativity status and years living in the United States with biobanking were not statistically significant. After stratifying by gender, the associations of acculturation, nativity status, and years living in the United States with biobanking were not statistically significant. Conclusion: Although individuals of Mexican descent who were モbiculturalヤ were more likely to participate in biobanking than individuals who were モhighly acculturated,ヤ the difference in rates of participation among acculturation categories was small. The high participation rate in biospecimen collection is likely due to extensive community-engaged research efforts. Future studies are warranted to understand individuals' participation in biobanking. Impact: Community-engaged research efforts may increase Hispanics' participation in biobanking.
dc.language.iso eng
dc.publisher American Association for Cancer Research
dc.rights This is an author's peer-reviewed final manuscript, as accepted by the publisher. The published article is copyrighted by the American Association for Cancer Research.
dc.title Association of Acculturation, Nativity, and Years Living in the United States with Biobanking among Individuals of Mexican Descent
dc.type Journal article
dc.citation.journalTitle Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention
dc.subject.keywordacculturation
biobanking
Mexican-Americans
dc.citation.volumeNumber 23
dc.citation.issueNumber 3
dc.type.dcmi Text
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-13-0747
dc.identifier.pmcid PMC3955016
dc.identifier.pmid 24609849
dc.type.publication post-print
dc.citation.firstpage 402
dc.citation.lastpage 408


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