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dc.contributor.authorKolosnjaj-Tabi, Jelena
Just, Jocelyne
Hartman, Keith B.
Laoudi, Yacine
Boudjemaa, Sabah
Alloyeau, Damien
Szwarc, Henri
Wilson, Lon J.
Moussa, Fathi
dc.date.accessioned 2016-01-15T19:47:52Z
dc.date.available 2016-01-15T19:47:52Z
dc.date.issued 2015
dc.identifier.citation Kolosnjaj-Tabi, Jelena, Just, Jocelyne, Hartman, Keith B., et al.. "Anthropogenic Carbon Nanotubes Found in the Airways of Parisian Children." EBioMedicine, 2, no. 11 (2015) Elsevier: 1697-1704. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ebiom.2015.10.012.
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1911/87858
dc.description.abstract Compelling evidence shows that fine particulate matters (PMs) from air pollution penetrate lower airways and are associated with adverse health effects even within concentrations below those recommended by the WHO. A paper reported a dose-dependent link between carbon content in alveolar macrophages (assessed only by optical microscopy) and the decline in lung function. However, to the best of our knowledge, PM had never been accurately characterized inside human lung cells and the most responsible components of the particulate mix are still unknown. On another hand carbon nanotubes (CNTs) from natural and anthropogenic sources might be an important component of PM in both indoor and outdoor air. We used high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy to characterize PM present in broncho-alveolar lavage-fluids (n = 64) and inside lung cells (n = 5 patients) of asthmatic children. We show that inhaled PM mostly consist of CNTs. These CNTs are present in all examined samples and they are similar to those we found in dusts and vehicle exhausts collected in Paris, as well as to those previously characterized in ambient air in the USA, in spider webs in India, and in ice core. These results strongly suggest that humans are routinely exposed to CNTs.
dc.language.iso eng
dc.publisher Elsevier
dc.rights This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license.
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.title Anthropogenic Carbon Nanotubes Found in the Airways of Parisian Children
dc.type Journal article
dc.contributor.funder Welch Foundation
dc.citation.journalTitle EBioMedicine
dc.contributor.org Richard E. Smalley Institute for Nanoscale Science and Technology
dc.subject.keywordair pollution
asthma
carbon
nanotubes
Lamellar bodies
dc.citation.volumeNumber 2
dc.citation.issueNumber 11
dc.type.dcmi Text
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ebiom.2015.10.012
dc.identifier.grantID C-0627 (Welch Foundation)
dc.type.publication publisher version
dc.citation.firstpage 1697
dc.citation.lastpage 1704


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