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dc.contributor.authorFrench, Jeffrey A.
Smith, Kevin B.
Alford, John R.
Guck, Adam
Birnie, Andrew K.
Hibbing, John R.
dc.date.accessioned 2015-07-08T19:59:45Z
dc.date.available 2015-07-08T19:59:45Z
dc.date.issued 2014
dc.identifier.citation French, Jeffrey A., Smith, Kevin B., Alford, John R., et al.. "Cortisol and politics: Variance in voting behavior is predicted by baseline cortisol levels." Physiology & Behavior, 133, (2014) Elsevier: 61-67. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.physbeh.2014.05.004.
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1911/80845
dc.description.abstract Participation in electoral politics is affected by a host of social and demographics variables, but there is growing evidence that biological predispositions may also play a role in behavior related to political involvement. We examined the role of individual variation in hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) stress axis parameters in explaining differences in self-reported and actual participation in political activities. Self-reported political activity, religious participation, and verified voting activity in U.S. national elections were collected from 105 participants, who were subsequently exposed to a standardized (nonpolitical) psychosocial stressor. We demonstrated that lower baseline salivary cortisol in the late afternoon was significantly associated with increased actual voting frequency in six national elections, but not with self-reported non-voting political activity. Baseline cortisol predicted significant variation in voting behavior above and beyond variation accounted for by traditional demographic variables (particularly age of participant in our sample). Participation in religious activity was weakly (and negatively) associated with baseline cortisol. Our results suggest that HPA-mediated characteristics of social, cognitive, and emotional processes may exert an influence on a trait as complex as voting behavior, and that cortisol is a better predictor of actual voting behavior, as opposed to self-reported political activity.
dc.language.iso eng
dc.publisher Elsevier
dc.rights This is an author's peer-reviewed final manuscript, as accepted by the publisher. The published article is copyrighted by Elsevier.
dc.title Cortisol and politics: Variance in voting behavior is predicted by baseline cortisol levels
dc.type Journal article
dc.contributor.funder National Science Foundation
dc.contributor.funder National Institutes of Health
dc.contributor.funder Nebraska Foundation
dc.citation.journalTitle Physiology & Behavior
dc.subject.keywordcortisol
stress
politics
voting behavior
dc.citation.volumeNumber 133
dc.type.dcmi Text
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.physbeh.2014.05.004
dc.identifier.pmcid PMC4120245
dc.identifier.pmid 24835544
dc.identifier.grantID BCS0826828 (National Science Foundation)
dc.identifier.grantID HD042882 (National Institutes of Health)
dc.type.publication post-print
dc.citation.firstpage 61
dc.citation.lastpage 67


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