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dc.contributor.advisor Anderson, John B.
dc.creatorWolfteich, Carl Martin
dc.date.accessioned 2015-03-18T00:06:33Z
dc.date.available 2015-03-18T00:06:33Z
dc.date.issued 1982
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1911/79358
dc.description.abstract This study demonstrates the validity of using vertical grain size progressions as an environmental indicator for ancient clastic sequences. Previous methods of grain size analysis are shown to be generally unreliable for environmental determinations. Grain size data is interpreted here in terms of idealized sequences for different sedimentary environments. The environments examined in this study include braided river-alluvial fans, meandering rivers and coastal barriers. Braided river systems are characterized by the random variability of grain Meandering size parameters within a vertical section. rivers and coastal barriers are each characterized by a distinct vertical sequence of sub-facies. These stratigraphic sequences are reflected in the vertical grain size progressions that characterize each of these environments. Vertical progressions in ancient sequences correlate well with lateral progressions in modern analagous environments. With improved coring technology, this method of grain size analysis can be used to establish the depositional environment of subsurface sand bodies. Vertical grain size progressions may prove to be an important exploratory tool for the petroleum industry as well as a reliable grain size method for the field geologist.
dc.format.extent 197 pp
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso eng
dc.subjectGeology
Geophysics
dc.title The use of vertical grain size progressions in establishing the depositional environment of ancient sand bodies
dc.identifier.digital WolfteichC
dc.contributor.committeeMember Dunbar, Robert B.
dc.contributor.committeeMember Casey, Richard E.
dc.type.genre Thesis
dc.type.material Text
thesis.degree.department Earth Science
thesis.degree.discipline Natural Sciences
thesis.degree.grantor Rice University
thesis.degree.level Masters
thesis.degree.name Master of Arts
dc.identifier.citation Wolfteich, Carl Martin. "The use of vertical grain size progressions in establishing the depositional environment of ancient sand bodies." (1982) Master’s Thesis, Rice University. https://hdl.handle.net/1911/79358.


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