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dc.contributor.authorRazafindratsima, Onja H.
Dunham, Amy E.
dc.date.accessioned 2015-02-11T15:45:10Z
dc.date.available 2015-02-11T15:45:10Z
dc.date.issued 2015
dc.identifier.citation Razafindratsima, Onja H. and Dunham, Amy E.. "Assessing the impacts of nonrandom seed dispersal by multiple frugivore partners on plant recruitment." Ecology, 96, no. 1 (2015) Ecological Society of America: 24-30. http://dx.doi.org/10.1890/14-0684.1.
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1911/79029
dc.description.abstract Directed dispersal is defined as enhanced dispersal of seeds into suitable microhabitats, resulting in higher recruitment than if seeds were dispersed randomly. While this constitutes one of the main explanations for the adaptive value of frugivore-mediated seed dispersal, the generality of this advantage has received little study, particularly when multiple dispersers are involved. We used probability recruitment models of a long-lived rainforest tree in Madagascar to compare recruitment success under dispersal by multiple frugivores, no dispersal, and random dispersal. Models were parameterized using a three-year recruitment experiment and observational data of dispersal events by three frugivorous lemur species that commonly disperse its seeds. Frugivore-mediated seed dispersal was nonrandom with respect to canopy cover and increased modeled per-seed sapling recruitment fourfold compared to no dispersal. Seeds dispersed by one frugivore, Eulemur rubriventer, had higher modeled recruitment probability than seeds dispersed randomly. However, as a group, our models suggest that seeds dispersed by lemurs would have lower recruitment than if dispersal were random. Results demonstrate the importance of evaluating the contribution of multiple frugivores to plant recruitment for understanding plant population dynamics and the ecological and evolutionary significance of seed dispersal.
dc.language.iso eng
dc.publisher Ecological Society of America
dc.rights Article is made available in accordance with the publisher's policy and may be subject to US copyright law. Please refer to the publisher's site for terms of use.
dc.title Assessing the impacts of nonrandom seed dispersal by multiple frugivore partners on plant recruitment
dc.type Journal article
dc.contributor.funder International Foundation for Science
dc.contributor.funder Rufford Foundation
dc.contributor.funder Primate Conservation Inc.
dc.contributor.funder The Explorers Club
dc.contributor.funder Idea Wild
dc.contributor.funder Primate Society of Great Britain
dc.contributor.funder Philanthropic Educational Organization
dc.contributor.funder Leakey Foundation
dc.contributor.funder Schlumberger Foundation
dc.citation.journalTitle Ecology
dc.subject.keywordCryptocarya crassifolia
demography
directed dispersal
lemurs
Madagascar
primates
seed dispersal
tropical forest
dc.citation.volumeNumber 96
dc.citation.issueNumber 1
dc.type.dcmi Text
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1890/14-0684.1
dc.identifier.grantID D/4985-1 (International Foundation for Science)
dc.identifier.grantID 5748-1 (Rufford Foundation)
dc.identifier.grantID 908 (Primate Conservation Inc.)
dc.type.publication publisher version
dc.citation.firstpage 24
dc.citation.lastpage 30


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