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dc.contributor.authorPierce, Mark C.
Weigum, Shannon E.
Jaslove, Jacob M.
Richards-Kortum, Rebecca
Tkaczyk, Tomasz S.
dc.date.accessioned 2014-10-29T18:15:01Z
dc.date.available 2014-10-29T18:15:01Z
dc.date.issued 2014
dc.identifier.citation Pierce, Mark C., Weigum, Shannon E., Jaslove, Jacob M., et al.. "Optical systems for point-of-care diagnostic instrumentation: analysis of imaging performance and cost." Annals of Biomedical Engineering, 42, no. 1 (2014) Springer: 231-240. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10439-013-0918-z.
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1911/77663
dc.description.abstract One of the key elements in point-of-care (POC) diagnostic test instrumentation is the optical system required for signal detection and / or imaging. Many tests which use fluorescence, absorbance, or colorimetric optical signals are under development for management of infectious diseases in resource limited settings, where the overall size and cost of the device is of critical importance. At present, high-performance lenses are expensive to fabricate and difficult to obtain commercially, presenting barriers for developers of in vitro POC tests or microscopic image-based diagnostics. We recently described a compact “hybrid” objective lens incorporating both glass and plastic optical elements, with a numerical aperture of 1.0 and field-of-view of 250 μm. This design concept may potentially enable mass-production of high-performance, low-cost optical systems which can be easily incorporated in the readout path of existing and emerging POC diagnostic assays. In this paper, we evaluate the biological imaging performance of these lens systems in three broad POC diagnostic application areas; (1) bright field microscopy of histopathology slides, (2) cytologic examination of blood smears, and (3) immunofluorescence imaging. We also break down the fabrication costs and draw comparisons with other miniature optical systems. The hybrid lenses provided images with quality comparable to conventional microscopy, enabling examination of neoplastic pathology and infectious parasites including malaria and cryptosporidium. We describe how these components can be produced at below $10 per unit in full-scale production quantities, making these systems well suited for use within POC diagnostic instrumentation.
dc.language.iso eng
dc.publisher Springer
dc.rights This is an author's peer-reviewed final manuscript, as accepted by the publisher. The published article is copyrighted by Springer.
dc.title Optical systems for point-of-care diagnostic instrumentation: analysis of imaging performance and cost
dc.type Journal article
dc.contributor.funder National Cancer Institute
dc.citation.journalTitle Annals of Biomedical Engineering
dc.contributor.org Rice 360 Institute for Global Health Technologies
dc.subject.keywordPOC optics
miniature optics
cost assessment
diagnostic imaging performance
dc.citation.volumeNumber 42
dc.citation.issueNumber 1
dc.type.dcmi Text
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10439-013-0918-z
dc.identifier.pmcid PMC3872497
dc.identifier.pmid 24097204
dc.identifier.grantID R01 CA124319 (National Cancer Institute)
dc.identifier.grantID R01 CA103830 (National Cancer Institute)
dc.type.publication post-print
dc.citation.firstpage 231
dc.citation.lastpage 240


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