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dc.contributor.authorBalagam, Rajesh
Litwin, Douglas B.
Czerwinski, Fabian
Sun, Mingzhai
Kaplan, Heidi B.
Shaevitz, Joshua W.
Igoshin, Oleg A.
dc.date.accessioned 2014-10-08T21:25:38Z
dc.date.available 2014-10-08T21:25:38Z
dc.date.issued 2014
dc.identifier.citation Balagam, Rajesh, Litwin, Douglas B., Czerwinski, Fabian, et al.. "Myxococcus xanthus Gliding Motors Are Elastically Coupled to the Substrate as Predicted by the Focal Adhesion Model of Gliding Motility." PLoS Computational Biology, 10, no. 5 (2014) Public Library of Science: e1003619. http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pcbi.1003619.
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1911/77462
dc.description.abstract Myxococcus xanthus is a model organism for studying bacterial social behaviors due to its ability to form complex multi-cellular structures. Knowledge of M. xanthus surface gliding motility and the mechanisms that coordinated it are critically important to our understanding of collective cell behaviors. Although the mechanism of gliding motility is still under investigation, recent experiments suggest that there are two possible mechanisms underlying force production for cell motility: the focal adhesion mechanism and the helical rotor mechanism, which differ in the biophysics of the cell-substrate interactions. Whereas the focal adhesion model predicts an elastic coupling, the helical rotor model predicts a viscous coupling. Using a combination of computational modeling, imaging, and force microscopy, we find evidence for elastic coupling in support of the focal adhesion model. Using a biophysical model of the M. xanthus cell, we investigated how the mechanical interactions between cells are affected by interactions with the substrate. Comparison of modeling results with experimental data for cell-cell collision events pointed to a strong, elastic attachment between the cell and substrate. These results are robust to variations in the mechanical and geometrical parameters of the model. We then directly measured the motor-substrate coupling by monitoring the motion of optically trapped beads and find that motor velocity decreases exponentially with opposing load. At high loads, motor velocity approaches zero velocity asymptotically and motors remain bound to beads indicating a strong, elastic attachment.
dc.language.iso eng
dc.publisher Public Library of Science
dc.rights This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.title Myxococcus xanthus Gliding Motors Are Elastically Coupled to the Substrate as Predicted by the Focal Adhesion Model of Gliding Motility
dc.type Journal article
dc.contributor.funder National Science Foundation
dc.citation.journalTitle PLoS Computational Biology
dc.citation.volumeNumber 10
dc.citation.issueNumber 5
dc.type.dcmi Text
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pcbi.1003619
dc.identifier.pmcid PMC4014417
dc.identifier.pmid 24810164
dc.identifier.grantID CAREER award MCB-0845919 (National Science Foundation)
dc.identifier.grantID CAREER award PHY-0844466 (National Science Foundation)
dc.identifier.grantID CNS-0821727 (National Science Foundation)
dc.identifier.grantID OCI-0959097 (National Science Foundation)
dc.type.publication publisher version
dc.citation.firstpage e1003619


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This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.