Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorParikh, Neil
Perl, Daniel
Lee, Michelle H.
Shah, Brijen
Young, Yuki
Chang, Shannon S.
Shukla, Richa
Polydorides, Alexandros D.
Moshier, Erin
Godbold, James
Zhou, Elinor
Mitchaml, Josephine
Richards-Kortum, Rebecca
Anandasabapathy, Sharmila
dc.date.accessioned 2014-10-07T21:52:29Z
dc.date.available 2014-10-07T21:52:29Z
dc.date.issued 2014
dc.identifier.citation Parikh, Neil, Perl, Daniel, Lee, Michelle H., et al.. "In vivo diagnostic accuracy of high resolution microendoscopy in differentiating neoplastic from non-neoplastic colorectal polyps: a prospective study." The American Journal of Gastroenterology, 109, (2014) The American Journal of Gastroenterology: 68-75. http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ajg.2013.387.
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1911/77435
dc.description.abstract High-resolution microendoscopy (HRME) is a low-cost, モoptical biopsyヤ technology that allows for subcellular imaging. The purpose of this study was to determine the in vivo diagnostic accuracy of the HRME for the differentiation of neoplastic from non-neoplastic colorectal polyps and compare it to that of high-definition white-light endoscopy (WLE) with histopathology as the gold standard. Three endoscopists prospectively detected a total of 171 polyps from 94 patients that were then imaged by HRME and classified in real-time as neoplastic (adenomatous, cancer) or non-neoplastic (normal, hyperplastic, inflammatory). HRME had a significantly higher accuracy (94%), specificity (95%), and positive predictive value (87%) for the determination of neoplastic colorectal polyps compared to WLE (65%, 39%, and 55%, respectively). When looking at small colorectal polyps (less than 10 mm), HRME continued to significantly outperform WLE in terms of accuracy (95% vs. 64%), specificity (98% vs. 40%) and positive predictive value (92% vs. 55%). These trends continued when evaluating diminutive polyps (less than 5 mm) as HRME's accuracy (95%), specificity (98%), and positive predictive value (93%) were all significantly greater than their WLE counterparts (62%, 41%, and 53%, respectively). In conclusion, this in vivo study demonstrates that HRME can be a very effective modality in the differentiation of neoplastic and non-neoplastic colorectal polyps. A combination of standard white-light colonoscopy for polyp detection and HRME for polyp classification has the potential to truly allow the endoscopist to selectively determine which lesions can be left in situ, which lesions can simply be discarded, and which lesions need formal histopathologic analysis.
dc.language.iso eng
dc.publisher The American Journal of Gastroenterology
dc.rights This is an author's peer-reviewed final manuscript, as accepted by the publisher. The published article is copyighted by The American Journal of Gastroenterology.
dc.title In vivo diagnostic accuracy of high resolution microendoscopy in differentiating neoplastic from non-neoplastic colorectal polyps: a prospective study
dc.type Journal article
dc.contributor.funder National Institutes of Health/National Cancer Institute
dc.citation.journalTitle The American Journal of Gastroenterology
dc.subject.keywordcolorectal polyps
adenoma classification
microendoscopy
neoplasia
diagnostic accuracy
dc.citation.volumeNumber 109
dc.type.dcmi Text
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ajg.2013.387
dc.identifier.pmcid PMC3947255
dc.identifier.pmid 24296752
dc.identifier.grantID CA 103830-07 (National Institutes of Health/National Cancer Institute)
dc.type.publication publisher version
dc.citation.firstpage 68
dc.citation.lastpage 75


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record