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dc.contributor.authorStoll, Richard J.
dc.date.accessioned 2013-10-28T19:00:27Z
dc.date.available 2013-10-28T19:00:27Z
dc.date.issued 2005
dc.identifier.citation Stoll, Richard J.. "Civil Reality? Simulation Experiments on the Impact of Civil War in a Realist World." Conflict Management and Peace Science, 22, no. 1 (2005) Taylor & Francis: 19-38. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/07388940590915309.
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1911/75014
dc.description.abstract The most widely used theoretical framework in international relations is realism. Realism takes many forms, and there have been hundreds of writings on the topic. In the United States, the two most popular exemplars of realism are Morgenthau (Morgenthau & Thompson, 1985; original 1948) and Waltz (1979). There is no systematic attempt to incorporate civil wars into the realist framework. In this paper, we use a computer simulation to explore the impact of a state's civil war experience on its interstate war experience. The results suggest that a state's civil war experience can have an impact on its interstate war experience.
dc.language.iso eng
dc.publisher Taylor & Francis
dc.rights This is an author's peer-reviewed final manuscript, as accepted by the publisher. The published article is copyrighted by Taylor & Francis
dc.title Civil Reality? Simulation Experiments on the Impact of Civil War in a Realist World
dc.type Journal article
dc.citation.journalTitle Conflict Management and Peace Science
dc.subject.keywordcivil war
realism
computer simulation
experiment
dc.citation.volumeNumber 22
dc.citation.issueNumber 1
dc.embargo.terms none
dc.type.dcmi Text
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1080/07388940590915309
dc.type.publication post-print
dc.citation.firstpage 19
dc.citation.lastpage 38


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