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dc.contributor.advisor Hamm, Keith E.
dc.creatorMiller, Renita
dc.date.accessioned 2013-09-17T00:46:38Z
dc.date.accessioned 2013-09-17T00:46:41Z
dc.date.available 2013-09-17T00:46:38Z
dc.date.available 2013-09-17T00:46:41Z
dc.date.created 2013-05
dc.date.issued 2013-09-16
dc.date.submitted May 2013
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1911/72075
dc.description.abstract In this dissertation I systematically examine African-American and Latino legislator behavior in a legislative setting. The project specifically examines whether and how minority legislators represent and influence African American and Latino policy interests during the legislative process. I perform an analysis of minority legislator participation rates on bills and develop an original measure of substantive representation using patterns in legislative speech of state representatives’ language during committee hearings. I build on existing theory in the representation literature and offer new hypotheses for expanding the scope of how substantive representation is defined and investigated, namely through an empirical investigation of the link between deliberation and descriptive representation. Second, I collect an original data set and develop an original measure of substantive representation to test these hypotheses with participation rates and a linguistic frame based content analysis approach of minority and non-minority representatives’ language on bills for racial perspectives during state legislative committee hearings on several policy issue areas including, but not limited to education, healthcare, and immigration. Third, I offer a critical test of hypotheses to test whether African American and Latino representatives’ (1) participate more when the legislation is deemed minority interest in comparison to their non-minority counterparts? (2) their behavior (or deliberation style) is different from non-minority legislators? (3) impact the deliberation style of non-minority legislators? The analysis draws on original data collected through committee hearing tapes and online video archives of Texas committee hearings in multiple policy areas, and the findings indicate that minority legislators do indeed provide a voice for minority constituents, providing more minority interest language on minority interest bills in comparison to their non-minority colleagues, especially when the legislation is threatening to minority populations. These results support the argument that minority legislators do indeed substantively represent minority constituents at levels greater than non-minority representatives during the legislative process.
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso eng
dc.subjectSubstantive representation
Descriptive representation
Deliberation
Minorities
African Americans
Latinos
State legislators
Participation
Committee hearings
State politics
Education policy
Immigration policy
Public policy
State legislatures
Minority voices
Legislative studies
Race and ethnicity
Minority coalitions
dc.title Minority Voices: The Representational Roles of African American and Latino Legislators during State Legislative Deliberations
dc.contributor.committeeMember Jones, Mark P.
dc.contributor.committeeMember Marschall, Melissa J.
dc.contributor.committeeMember Byrd, Alexander
dc.contributor.committeeMember Meier, Kenneth
dc.date.updated 2013-09-17T00:46:42Z
dc.identifier.slug 123456789/ETD-2013-05-333
dc.type.genre Thesis
dc.type.material Text
thesis.degree.department Political Science
thesis.degree.discipline Social Sciences
thesis.degree.grantor Rice University
thesis.degree.level Doctoral
thesis.degree.name Doctor of Philosophy
dc.identifier.citation Miller, Renita. "Minority Voices: The Representational Roles of African American and Latino Legislators during State Legislative Deliberations." (2013) Diss., Rice University. https://hdl.handle.net/1911/72075.


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