Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisor Schnur, Tatiana T.
dc.creatorWalker Hughes, Julie
dc.date.accessioned 2013-09-16T18:32:11Z
dc.date.accessioned 2013-09-16T18:32:15Z
dc.date.available 2013-09-16T18:32:11Z
dc.date.available 2013-09-16T18:32:15Z
dc.date.created 2013-05
dc.date.issued 2013-09-16
dc.date.submitted May 2013
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1911/72060
dc.description.abstract Language production depends upon the context in which words are named. Renaming previous items results in facilitation while naming pictures semantically related to previous items causes interference. A computational model (Oppenheim, Dell, & Schwartz, 2010) proposes that both facilitation and interference are the result of using naming events as “learning experiences” to ensure future accuracy. The model successfully simulates naming data from different semantic interference paradigms by implementing a learning mechanism that creates interference and a boosting mechanism that resolves interference. This study tested this model’s assumptions that semantic interference effects in naming are created by learning and resolved by boosting. Findings revealed no relationship between individual performance across semantic interference tasks, and measured learning and boosting abilities did not predict performance. These results suggest that learning and boosting mechanisms do not fully characterize the processes underlying semantic interference when naming.
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso eng
dc.subjectSemantic interference
Speech production
Learning
Boosting
Priming
Computational modeling
dc.title All cumulative semantic interference is not equal: A test of the Dark Side Model of lexical access
dc.contributor.committeeMember Martin, Randi C.
dc.contributor.committeeMember Fischer-Baum, Simon
dc.date.updated 2013-09-16T18:32:16Z
dc.identifier.slug 123456789/ETD-2013-05-537
dc.type.genre Thesis
dc.type.material Text
thesis.degree.department Psychology
thesis.degree.discipline Social Sciences
thesis.degree.grantor Rice University
thesis.degree.level Masters
thesis.degree.name Master of Arts
dc.identifier.citation Walker Hughes, Julie. "All cumulative semantic interference is not equal: A test of the Dark Side Model of lexical access." (2013) Master’s Thesis, Rice University. https://hdl.handle.net/1911/72060.


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record