Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisor Gottschalk, Arthur W.
dc.creatorWalczak, Christopher
dc.date.accessioned 2013-09-16T18:31:59Z
dc.date.accessioned 2013-09-16T18:32:01Z
dc.date.available 2013-09-16T18:31:59Z
dc.date.available 2013-09-16T18:32:01Z
dc.date.created 2013-05
dc.date.issued 2013-09-16
dc.date.submitted May 2013
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1911/72059
dc.description.abstract The Evening Shadow, a six-minute work for symphony orchestra, is a short symphonic poem composed with the intent of evoking a sensation of lament and eventual deliverance. Drawing from the “Neapolitan Complex” found in Beethoven’s string quartet in C-sharp minor, op. 131 (exploitation of the semitone between C#-D), I attempted to create a dramatic “storyline” utilizing the semitone relation between E and F. From a programmatic standpoint, upward motion from E to F is meant to represent yearning (mm. 5-6, violins, mm. 14-15, violin/vibraphone, m. 18, cello, embedded in m. 20, flute 2) while downward motion from F to E (mm. 110-113, brass) symbolizes rescue and redemption. Motivic transformation was paramount to the construction of The Evening Shadow. Five primary motives are stated and developed. The first appears in the solo violin from mm. 3-4 and is transformed at m. 44 in the oboe and 2nd violins. The second motive is stated in mm. 9-12 in the 1st violins, and returns in canon from mm. 96-106. The third motive appears in the oboe in mm. 29-30 and is developed extensively (mm. 41-42, 47-48, 110-113). The fourth motive is stated in the 1st violins at m. 33 and returns in m. 52 in the 2nd violins. The final motive is first heard in the horns in mm. 39-40 and ends the piece from mm. 127-129. The motivic transformations make use of transposition, modal “adjustment,” and built in rubato effects, as well a large degree of fragmentation and recombination. Traditional contrapuntal technique was utilized throughout the work. Global harmonic motion of the piece, which makes use of skeletal tonic/dominant relations, can be heard as a progression through the following “tonicizations” and respective modalities: E/F (pitch-centric, no modality, mm. 1-33), D (Dorian, mm. 34-55), A (Dorian, mm. 52-54), E (pseudo-Phrygian, mm. 65-87), C (Mixolydian, mm. 108-121), G (Mixolydian, mm. 127-132), and E/F (pitch-centric, no modality, mm. 133-137). Atonal pitch-class set sonorities were used as structural rhetoric throughout. The aggregate collection, drawing from dodecaphonic theory, is used sparingly both melodically (mm. 16-17, violins and violas), and harmonically (mm. 2-3, 64, 66, 69, 137). Conceptual difficulties arise from orchestrational considerations in a contemporary work due to the broad array of possibilities demonstrated in the scores that span the history of orchestral music. I sought to create a hybrid of advanced traditional orchestration (Mahler, Strauss) and texturalist practices (Lutoslawski, Ligeti).
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso eng
dc.subjectChristopher Walczak
Dissertation
Thesis
The Evening Shadow
Rice University
Shepherd School of Music
Composition
dc.title The Evening Shadow
dc.contributor.committeeMember Chen, Shih-Hui
dc.contributor.committeeMember Bailey, Walter B.
dc.contributor.committeeMember Sanders, Paula
dc.date.updated 2013-09-16T18:32:02Z
dc.identifier.slug 123456789/ETD-2013-05-529
dc.type.genre Thesis
dc.type.material Text
thesis.degree.department Music
thesis.degree.discipline Music
thesis.degree.grantor Rice University
thesis.degree.level Doctoral
thesis.degree.name Doctor of Musical Arts
dc.identifier.citation Walczak, Christopher. "The Evening Shadow." (2013) Diss., Rice University. https://hdl.handle.net/1911/72059.


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record