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dc.contributor.advisor Hebl, Michelle R.
dc.creatorRuggs, Enrica
dc.date.accessioned 2013-09-16T16:37:30Z
dc.date.accessioned 2013-09-16T16:37:35Z
dc.date.available 2013-09-16T16:37:30Z
dc.date.available 2013-09-16T16:37:35Z
dc.date.created 2013-05
dc.date.issued 2013-09-16
dc.date.submitted May 2013
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1911/72035
dc.description.abstract One trend that is becoming overwhelmingly popular in mainstream America, particularly among the youth (prior to and as they enter the workforce) is getting tattoos (Armstrong, Owen, Roberts, & Koch, 2002; Chivers, 2002; Laumann & Derick, 2006), yet there is little empirical evidence on the impact of having tattoos in an employment context. The current dissertation sought to understand this impact by examining the influence of employee tattoos on customers’ stereotypical perceptions, attitudes toward the employee, organization, and products, and behavior toward the employee and organization across two studies. In the first study, customers viewed a marketing video in which the employee either had a visible tattoo or not. Customers reported more stereotypical perceptions of tattooed (versus nontattooed) employees, such that they perceived the tattooed employee as possessing more artistic traits, having a less favorable appearance, and being risker. Stereotypical perceptions of artistic traits were the strongest, and these perceptions mediated the relation between tattoo presence and evaluations of the employee, organization, and product. In a second field study, employees (who either had a tattoo or not) sold restaurant cards to customers at a convention to raise money for a charity organization. Results showed that customers engaged in more avoidance behaviors with tattooed (versus) nontattooed employees; however, there were no significant differences in purchasing behavior based on tattoo presence. The results of both studies provide insight into a mechanism for how tattoo presence impacts customers’ reactions to employees, organizations, and products. Implications and future research ideas are discussed.
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso eng
dc.subjectStigma
Discrimination
Consumer behavior
Tattoos
dc.title The Influence of Employee Inkings on Consumer Behavior: Booed, Eschewed, and Tattooed
dc.contributor.committeeMember Beier, Margaret E.
dc.contributor.committeeMember Oswald, Frederick L.
dc.contributor.committeeMember Smith, D. Brent
dc.date.updated 2013-09-16T16:37:35Z
dc.identifier.slug 123456789/ETD-2013-05-445
dc.type.genre Thesis
dc.type.material Text
thesis.degree.department Psychology
thesis.degree.discipline Social Sciences
thesis.degree.grantor Rice University
thesis.degree.level Doctoral
thesis.degree.name Doctor of Philosophy
dc.identifier.citation Ruggs, Enrica. "The Influence of Employee Inkings on Consumer Behavior: Booed, Eschewed, and Tattooed." (2013) Diss., Rice University. https://hdl.handle.net/1911/72035.


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