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dc.contributor.advisor Wamble, Mark
dc.creatorMachen, Chad J.
dc.date.accessioned 2013-06-14T19:26:16Z
dc.date.available 2013-06-14T19:26:16Z
dc.date.issued 1997
dc.identifier.citation Machen, Chad J.. "Manufacturing resiliency." (1997) Master’s Thesis, Rice University. https://hdl.handle.net/1911/71311.
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1911/71311
dc.description.abstract As a forum for a prototypical form of education/manufacturing, this thesis enables manufacturing workers to learn how to adapt to differing situations in the workplace. By designing a resilient facility that allows for a change of production modes and processes, one may assist in empowering the manufacturing worker with the ability to remain employable. Upstate South Carolina has undergone a transformation over the last 40 years. The global economy has made itself readily apparent through increasing investment in the manufacturing base of this once agriculturally dominant pocket of the country. Population, demographics, real estate, and collective financial gain are but a few of the areas of life that have been directly impacted because of this addition to the area. With the ever-increasing rate of phasing in and out of products and processes, the industrial climate demands a flexible worker. Manufacturing workers need to be able to switch between modes of production in order to remain abreast with the industry. Collecting a pension at the end of a 25 to 30 year stint at one job is not the standard work experience anymore. The new reality is that at some point in the career of most workers a change will occur, be that of employer, position, or both. The ability to handle this change with poise, or career resiliency, can be achieved through early preparation and training. Industries are already taking measures to institute educational programs that aid their employees in acquiring new skills that may lead to subsequent employment once certain products or production modes are no longer needed. By forging partnerships between big business and education, a prototypical manufacturing facility can be created that will benefit local industry and the residents of the area. Employers are provided with a capable worker, and residents are given greater career opportunities.
dc.format.extent 74 pp
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso eng
dc.subjectArchitecture
Vocational education
Management
dc.title Manufacturing resiliency
dc.identifier.digital MachenC
dc.contributor.committeeMember Brown, David P.
dc.contributor.committeeMember Wall, Alex
dc.type.genre Thesis
dc.type.material Text
thesis.degree.department Architecture
thesis.degree.discipline Architecture
thesis.degree.grantor Rice University
thesis.degree.level Masters
thesis.degree.name Master of Architecture


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