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dc.contributor.advisor Patten, Robert L.
dc.creatorScholtz, Amelia Catherine
dc.date.accessioned 2013-03-08T00:38:43Z
dc.date.available 2013-03-08T00:38:43Z
dc.date.issued 2012
dc.identifier.citation Scholtz, Amelia Catherine. "Dispatches from Japanglia: Anglo-Japanese Literary Imbrication, 1880-1920." (2012) Diss., Rice University. https://hdl.handle.net/1911/70435.
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1911/70435
dc.description.abstract This project considers the ways in which English authors and a diverse group of Japanese subjects co-produced literary representations of Japan in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. I argue that Anglo-Japanese encounters were defined by imbrication: by a number of overlapping phenomena that developed both coincidentally and as a result of contact between the two countries. Among coincidental developments, I include urbanisation and the development of a prosperous middle class in both Japan and England. Developments that appear to arise as a result of Anglo-Japanese contact include the prevalence of Social Darwinism in intellectual circles in both countries, as well as the growth of transnational bureaucratic networks. I refer to these phenomena collectively as "Japanglia," The literary implications of these overlaps--some highly ephemeral, others longer lasting--form the focus of this dissertation. In the four case studies presented here, I find that Japanglian phenomena compel us to adopt variously intertextual, inter-artistic, tropological, and somatically-focused approaches to our reading. My first chapter focuses on intertextuality in the work of Sir Christopher Dresser and Meiji bureaucrat Ishida Tametake. I find that the existence of Japanglian bureaucratic networks (formed in the overlap of English and Japanese bureaucracies) resulted in the publication of interpenetrative English and Japanese accounts of the same events. Japanglian texts may also be inter-artistic, using culturally blurred visual and decorative artforms as models for their own representations of Japan. This becomes apparent in my second case study, which considers the relationship between Gilbert and Sullivan's Mikado and Japanese ukiyo-e prints . Tropologically focused reading is also of use when reading these texts, for common tropes circulated between writers of English and Japanese origins. This common tropology features in the work of Rudyard Kipling and Okakura Kakuzo ̄. Finally, as my study of the Japan writings of Marie Stopes suggests, blurring between the categories of Englishness and Japaneseness may register in the phenomenology of somatic experience.
dc.format.extent 361 p.
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso eng
dc.subjectSocial sciences
Language
Literature
Linguistics
Anglo-Japanese relations
Japan
Transnationalism
Asian literature
Asian studies
British and Irish literature
dc.title Dispatches from Japanglia: Anglo-Japanese Literary Imbrication, 1880-1920
dc.type Thesis
dc.identifier.digital ScholtzA
dc.type.material Text
thesis.degree.department English
thesis.degree.discipline Humanities
thesis.degree.grantor Rice University
thesis.degree.level Doctoral
thesis.degree.name Doctor of Philosophy
dc.identifier.callno THESIS ENGL. 2012 SCHOLTZ


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