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dc.contributor.advisor Mikos, Antonios G.
dc.creatorMountziaris, Paschalia Maria
dc.date.accessioned 2013-03-08T00:36:57Z
dc.date.available 2013-03-08T00:36:57Z
dc.date.issued 2012
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1911/70361
dc.description Only volume 2 has been digitized.
dc.description.abstract Inflammatory processes are infamous for their destructive effects on tissues and joints in a variety of diseases. Within the body, inflammation is a highly regulated biological response whose purpose is to promote tissue regeneration following injury. However, in certain settings, inflammation persists and leads to progressive tissue destruction. This thesis focused on modulating inflammatory signaling in both contexts. Part I investigated the effects of a model pro-inflammatory cytokine, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), on the in vitro osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). In contrast, Part II describes the development and in vivo evaluation of the first intra-articular controlled release system for the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), which silences inflammatory signaling and thus mitigates the painful joint damage seen in inflammatory TMJ disease. The following specific aims were addressed: (1) to determine the concentration of TNF-α that enhances in vitro osteogenic differentiation of MSCs; (2) to determine the temporal pattern of TNF-α delivery that enhances in vitro osteogenic differentiation of MSCs; (3) to determine the impact of bone-like extracellular matrix (ECM) on the concentration and temporal pattern of TNF-α delivery that enhances in vitro osteogenic differentiation of MSCs; (4) to evaluate the biocompatibility of intra-articular microparticles in the rat TMJ; (5) to develop a microparticle-based formulation for sustained release of a model anti-inflammatory small interfering ribonucleic acid (siRNA); and (6) to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of intra-articular microparticles delivering siRNA in an animal model of TMJ inflammation. These studies led to the development of powerful strategies to rationally control inflammation to promote bone regeneration and mitigate joint damage in the setting of disease, both of which will ultimately improve the quality and specificity of therapies available in modern medicine.
dc.format.extent 155 p.
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso eng
dc.subjectHealth sciences
Environmental science
Applied sciences
Inflammatory signaling
Bone regeneration
Joint damage
TMJ disorders
Controlled release
Biomedical engineering
Pharmacy sciences
dc.title Harnessing Inflammatory Signaling to Promote Bone Regeneration and Mitigate Joint Damage
dc.identifier.digital MountziarisP
dc.type.genre Thesis
dc.type.material Text
thesis.degree.department Bioengineering
thesis.degree.discipline Engineering
thesis.degree.grantor Rice University
thesis.degree.level Doctoral
thesis.degree.name Doctor of Philosophy
dc.identifier.citation Mountziaris, Paschalia Maria. "Harnessing Inflammatory Signaling to Promote Bone Regeneration and Mitigate Joint Damage." (2012) Diss., Rice University. https://hdl.handle.net/1911/70361.


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