Now showing items 1-20 of 71

    • A Nationally Representative Survey of Faith and Work: Demographic Subgroup Differences around Calling and Conflict 

      Ecklund, Elaine Howard; Daniels, Denise; Bolger, Daniel; Johnson, Laura (2020)
      Research has increasingly highlighted the importance of business leaders allowing people to bring their whole selves to work. And religion is an important part of the whole self for many. However, we lack the large-scale national data needed to explore how Americans see the connections between religion and work. Here, from “Faith at Work: An Empirical ...
    • Acculturation and Self-Rated Health among Latino and Asian Immigrants to the United States 

      Kimbro, Rachel Tolbert; Gorman, Bridget K.; Schachter, Ariela (2012-08)
      The ways in which immigrant health profiles change with shifts in acculturation is of increasing interest to scholars and policy makers in the United States, but little is known about the mechanisms that may link acculturation and self-rated health, particularly for Asians. Utilizing the National Latino and Asian American Study (NLAAS) and its data ...
    • As Disaster Costs Rise, So Does Inequality 

      Howell, Junia; Elliott, James R. (2018)
      Across the United States, communities are experiencing increases in the frequency and severity of natural hazards. The pervasiveness and upward trajectory of these damages are worrisome enough, but equally disconcerting are the social inequalities they can leave in their wake. To examine these inequalities, the authors linked county-level damage data ...
    • Binational Social Networks and Assimilation: A Test of the Importance of Transnationalism 

      Mouw, Ted; Chavez, Sergio; Edelblute, Heather; Verdery, Ashton (2014)
      While the concept of transnationalism has gained widespread popularity among scholars as a way to describe immigrants' long-term maintenance of cross-border ties to their origin communities, critics have argued that the overall proportion of immigrants who engage in transnational behavior is low and that, as a result, transnationalism has little ...
    • Can Religiosity Be Explained by ‘Brain Wiring’? An Analysis of US Adults’ Opinions 

      Mehta, Sharan Kaur; Scheitle, Christopher P.; Ecklund, Elaine Howard (2019)
      Studies examining how religion shapes individuals’ attitudes about science have focused heavily on a narrow range of topics, such as evolution. This study expands this literature by looking at how religion influences individuals’ attitudes towards the claim that neuroscience, or “brain wiring,” can explain differences in religiosity. Our analysis of ...
    • (Can’t Get No) Neighborhood Satisfaction? How Multilevel Immigration Factors Shape Latinos’ Neighborhood Attitudes 

      Schachter, Ariela; Sharp, Gregory; Kimbro, Rachel T. (2020)
      How does immigrant generation shape Latinos’ neighborhood attitudes? We extend theoretical frameworks focused on neighborhood attainment to explore how immigrant generation structures Latinos’ neighborhood satisfaction, particularly with respect to neighborhood immigrant composition. Using longitudinal data from the Los Angeles Family and Neighborhood ...
    • Communication flows and the durability of a transnational social field 

      Verdery, Ashton M.; Mouw, Ted; Edelblute, Heather; Chavez, Sergio (2018)
      We draw on unique data on communication flows between migrants and non-migrants in a bi-national, cross-border social network to test competing theories of the process of social incorporation. While advocates of the assimilation perspective argue that social incorporation is largely a one-way street, a recent literature on immigrant transnationalism ...
    • Community social environments and cigarette smoking 

      Denney, Justin T.; Sharp, Gregory; Kimbro, Rachel Tolbert (2022)
      Cigarette smoking remains a primary contributor to health disparities in the United States, and significant evidence suggests that smoking behavior is socially influenced. Though residential neighborhoods are important for health disparities, recent evidence suggests that people spend the majority of their waking time away from the residential ...
    • Consequences of Flexibility Stigma Among Academic Scientists and Engineers 

      (2014)
      Flexibility stigma, the devaluation of workers who seek or are presumed to need flexible work arrangements, fosters a mismatch between workplace demands and the needs of professionals. The authors survey モideal workersヤラscience, technology, engineering, and math faculty at a top research universityラto determine the consequences of working in an ...
    • Cycles Within the System: Metropolitanization and Internal Migration in the U.S., 1965-1990 

      Elliott, James R.; Center for Demography and Ecology, University of Wisconsin-Madison (1995)
      This paper uses a typology of local metropolitan development to examine population redistribution trends in the U.S. over the past three decades. Theories of systemic maturation and urban life-cycles are discussed. Subsequent analysis of population and inter-county migration data reveals that Deconcentration has become an increasingly common subprocess ...
    • Deciding to Wait: Partnership Status, Economic Conditions, and Pregnancy during the Great Recession 

      Percheski, Christine; Kimbro, Rachel Tolbert (2017)
      The Great Recession was associated with reduced fertility in the United States. Many questions about the dynamics underlying this reduction remain unanswered, however, including whether reduced fertility rates were driven by decreases in intended or unplanned pregnancies. Using restricted data from the 2006–2010 National Survey of Family Growth (N = ...
    • Democracy and self-rated health across 67 countries: A multilevel analysis 

      Krueger, Patrick M.; Dovel, Kathryn; Denney, Justin T. (2015)
      Existing research has found a positive association between countries' level of democratic governance and the health of their populations, although that research is limited by the use of data from small numbers of high-income countries or aggregate data that do not assess individual-level health outcomes. We extend prior research by using multilevel ...
    • Determinants of Confidence in U.S. Institutions: Comparing Congress and Corporations 

      Bolger, Daniel; Thomson, Robert Jr.; Ecklund, Elaine Howard (2021)
      Objectives: The political discourse surrounding the 2016 U.S. presidential election highlighted discontent with both Congress and corporations, a reality corroborated in recent scholarship highlighting declines in institutional confidence among U.S. citizens. Here we test theories of institutional confidence to understand the social and cultural ...
    • Divergent Residential Pathways from Flood-Prone Areas: How Neighborhood Inequalities Are Shaping Urban Climate Adaptation 

      Elliott, James; Loughran, Kevin; Brown, Phylicia Lee; Department of Sociology (2021)
      Flood risks are rising across the United States, putting the economic and social values of growing numbers of homes at risk. In response, the federal government is funding the purchase and demolition of housing in areas of greatest jeopardy, tacitly promoting residential resettlement as a strategy of climate adaptation, especially in cities. Despite ...
    • Does Height Matter? An Examination of Height Preferences in Romantic Coupling 

      Yancey, George; Emerson, Michael O. (2014)
      Amidst increasingly equality in belief and in practice between the sexes, we ask if height preferences still matter, and if so, why people say they matter. First, we collected data from Yahoo! dating personal advertisements. Second, we used answers to open-ended questions in an online survey. The Yahoo! data document that height is still important ...
    • Education and health: The joint role of gender and sexual identity 

      Zhang, Zhe; Solazzo, Alexa; Gorman, Bridget K. (2020)
      Background: Prior research has found that education's association with health can differ by social positions such as gender. Yet, none of the existing work has tested whether the relationship between education and self-rated health is equivalent across sexual orientation groups, and additionally, if these associations differ for men and women. Deploying ...
    • Evangelicals, evolution, and inerrancy: a comparative study of congregational boundary work 

      Unsworth, Amy; Ecklund, Elaine Howard (2021)
      A number of evangelical Christian denominations and networks uphold a specific doctrine of Scripture, stating that the Bible is the ‘inerrant’ word of God. Those who adhere to biblical inerrancy tend to reject literary interpretations of the creation accounts in the Bible and therefore to reject evolutionary theory. Indeed, evolution rejection ...
    • Examining Links Between Religion, Evolution Views, and Climate Change Skepticism 

      Ecklund, Elaine Howard; Scheitle, Christopher P.; Peifer, Jared; Bolger, Daniel (2016)
      Recent media portrayals link climate change skepticism to evolution skepticism, often as part of a larger “antiscience” tendency related to membership in conservative religious groups. Using national survey data, we examine the link between evolution skepticism and climate change skepticism, and consider religion’s association with both. Our analysis ...
    • Examining the Effects of Exposure to Religion in the Workplace on Perceptions of Religious Discrimination 

      Scheitle, Christopher P.; Ecklund, Elaine Howard (2016)
      Charges of religion-related employment discrimination have doubled in the past decade. Multiple factors are likely contributing to this trend, such as the increased religious diversity of the US population and the increased interest of employees and some employers in bringing religion to work. Using national survey data we examine how the presence ...
    • Families, Resources, and Adult Health: Where Do Sexual Minorities Fit? 

      Denney, Justin T.; Gorman, Bridget K.; Barrera, Cristina B. (2013)
      Extensive research documents the relevance of families and socioeconomic resources to health. This paper extends that research to sexual minorities, using twelve years of the National Health Interview Survey (N = 460,459) to examine self-evaluations of health among male and female adults living in same sex and opposite sex relationships. Adjusting ...