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dc.creatorNguyá Duc Tue
dc.date.accessioned 2012-12-20T21:16:28Z
dc.date.available 2012-12-20T21:16:28Z
dc.date.issued 2011
dc.identifier.citation Nguyá Duc Tue, interview by Du Steven. 2011. Vietnamese American Heritage Foundation oral history interviews, 2011, MS 647, Woodson Research Center, Fondren Library, Rice University. https://hdl.handle.net/1911/68490.
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1911/68490
dc.description This recording and transcript form part of a collection of oral history interviews conducted by the Vietnamese American Heritage Foundation and donated to the Chao Center for Asian Studies at Rice University. This collection includes video recordings of interviews with Vietnamese Americans native to or living in Texas. This interview forms part of the national 500 Oral Histories Project conducted by the Vietnamese American Heritage Foundation.
dc.description.abstract Doctor Nguyá Duc Tue (also called Viet Nguyen) was born in Saigon on 11 July 1950. He arrived in the United States on 31 March, 1978. His current occupation is as an emergency and family physician. He is Buddhist. Doctor Nguyá Duc Tue first arrived in Portland, Oregon where he refined his medical skills. He consequently moved to Independence, Louisiana where he worked in a hospital as an emergency physician. After a year, he became an emergency medicine resident in New Orleans, Louisiana while studying Tulane University. After graduation in 1982, he moved to Cleveland, Ohio where he worked as an emergency physician. After 1983, he moved to Houston where he worked as a family and emergency physician at Spring Branch Memorial from 1983 to 2003. He now works at St. Luke’s. Doctor Nguyá Duc Tue’s two older brothers left to study so he stayed behind to care for his elderly parents who did not want to leave the country, despite the opportunity to leave earlier than he did. Dr. Nguyen Duc Tue remembers with great anguish a big event, that was the TET Offense (1968) when the Viet Cong attacked cities of South Vietnam. At that time, he was the student representative of Chu Van An High School and a boy scout. He eye-witnessed many sufferings of his countrymen and volunteered to work at the refugee camp which was built at the school. Dr. Nguyen Duc Tue graduated from the Saigon School of Medicine in 1975 then worked at Binh Dan Hospital, right before the Communist took over South Vietnam. On April 30, 1975, he eye-witnessed tanks of the Communist approaching the Independent Palace. Everybody was petrified when they saw North Vietnamese soldiers in tanks on the streets. Dr. Nguyen Duc Tue continued working at Binh Dan Hospital while many older doctors were sent to the re-education camp. In order to replace those doctors, the North sent unqualified doctors to the hospital because their policy was “It’s rather Red than Expert†. The conditions at the hospital were very bad. Doctors had to followed the new policies, there were lack of supplies (anesthetic, suture, etc) in addition the salaries of doctors was very low. It was not enough to support one. To compare the level of medical knowledge between the North and the South, Dr. Nguyen Duc Tue states that at that time, the North was 50 years behind the South. For the public health, they did not have enough supplies, bad services, unqualified doctors. Dr. Nguyen Duc Tue narrates his escape by a barge from the Saigon River with 150 persons in 42 days on the sea. After 7 days, the engine of the barge broke down, they were saved by a Thailand fishing boat. In an island of Thailand, 150 persons of his barge and 150 other persons were put into one boat, and then were pulled to the international waters. After more than a month on the sea, they were saved and the UNHCR let them live in a refugee camp in Malaysia. Dr. Nguyen Duc Tue feels that the period of time living at the refugee camp was the happiest time of his life because he just escaped from the communist regime. Dr. Nguyen Duc Tue thinks that most persons who escaped from the country have the post-traumatic syndromes. Although they have lived in the United States or other countries for a long time, they still have had nightmares on being arrested, put in jail, beaten, raped or died at sea. Dr. Nguyen Duc Tue asks himself why the Americans helped Vietnamese refugees with open-hearted behaviors while millions of them had to escape from their country which was governed by persons who were of the same race, same skin color, same blood, same manners and customs with them. Besides being a medical doctor, Dr. Nguyen Duc Tue is also a writer. His pen name is Viet Nguyen. He likes politics and writes an article every 2 weeks for “Ngay Nay†Newspaper in Houston and “Nguoi Viet†Newspaper in California. The story of his escape by barge was posted in a novel with the title “Freedom in the Sea of Blood†. He praises the work of preserving the History and Culture of VAHF. He mentions that a young man who grows up in America usually finds his roots when he reaches 35-40 years old, Dr. Nguyen Duc Tue analyzes the “Jasmine Revolution†event which happened in 2010 in Africa and Middle East, and reasons it did not happen in Asia.
dc.format.extent 01:48:14.39
dc.language.iso vie
dc.publisher Rice University
dc.rights The copyright holder for this material has granted Rice University permission to share this material online.
dc.rightsPermission to examine physical and digital collection items does not imply permission for publication. Fondren Library’s Woodson Research Center / Special Collections has made these materials available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Any uses beyond the spirit of Fair Use require permission from owners of rights, heir(s) or assigns. See http://library.rice.edu/guides/publishing-wrc-materials
dc.title Nguyá Duc Tue video oral history interview and transcript
dc.digitization.specifications This oral history material was born digital, with video originals in mts, mp4 or mpg format, converted by Fondren Library to an archival master format of directly transcoded H.264 video codec and aac audio codec in an MOV wrapper. Derivative video files are compressed H.264 video codec and aac audio codec in an mp4 wrapper, hinted for streaming.
dc.date.digital 2011
dc.source.collection Vietnamese American Heritage Foundation oral history interviews, 2011, MS 647, Woodson Research Center, Fondren Library, Rice University
dc.identifier.digital wrc02764
dc.type.genre oral histories (document genres)
dc.type.dcmi MovingImage
dc.type.dcmi Text
dc.contributor.interviewer Du Steven
dcterms.accessRights restricted


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