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dc.creatorBailey, Joseph Michael
dc.date.accessioned 2007-08-21T00:21:52Z
dc.date.available 2007-08-21T00:21:52Z
dc.date.issued 2004
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1911/17653
dc.description.abstract Mobile/manufactured homes are a part of a larger cultural language, in and through which we communicate with each other; a kind of common and general knowledge practiced daily. We creatively use, or misuse this language in our communication with those around us, and to ourselves. Today's manufactured homes are shedding their skins, adapting a less visible, more mimetic image as they settle down comfortably into the suburbs. They have fought to loose their hitches and drop their axels, next they will lose their chassis; the very thing which has served as an index of their, and their residents marginalization. It is within the manufactured home's chassis, this typically marginalizing element, that another space exists. Doubling the structural frame allows it to accommodate new programs, recasting it as a support frame. When a framework is thus moved its nature as a framing device may be revealed, exposing its naturalizing tendency.
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso eng
dc.subjectArchitecture
dc.title Frameworks
dc.type.genre Thesis
dc.type.material Text
thesis.degree.department Architecture
thesis.degree.discipline Architecture
thesis.degree.grantor Rice University
thesis.degree.level Masters
thesis.degree.name Master of Architecture
dc.identifier.citation Bailey, Joseph Michael. "Frameworks." (2004) Master’s Thesis, Rice University. https://hdl.handle.net/1911/17653.


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