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dc.contributor.advisor Saggau, Peter
dc.creatorIyer, Vijay
dc.date.accessioned 2009-06-04T08:03:25Z
dc.date.available 2009-06-04T08:03:25Z
dc.date.issued 2003
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1911/17596
dc.description.abstract Recent research has highlighted the vital role played by dendrites in effecting the computational properties of single neurons in the central nervous system (CNS). An ultraviolet (UV) acousto-optic laser scanning microscope system was developed that enables UV laser pulses to be delivered to multiple user-selected sites in the microscope's specimen plane with high spatial (<10mum) and temporal (<20mus) resolution. By employing "caged" neurotransmitters, the system can effect physiologically realistic spatio-temporal patterns of "synaptic" stimulation to the dendrites of a single cultured neuron. This system was combined with a previously developed acousto-optic laser scanning system for fast, multi-site optical recording of electrical activity (Bullen et al. 1999). This combination---the "Dual Scanner"---allows the study of important dendritic questions such as the underlying mechanisms of spatial and temporal summation. This thesis describes several current outstanding questions of dendritic integration, the design and construction of the system, and some promising preliminary results.
dc.format.extent 216 p.
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso eng
dc.subjectNeurosciences
Electronics
Electrical engineering
dc.title A dual acousto-optic laser scanning microscope system for the study of dendritic integration: Design, construction, and preliminary results
dc.type.genre Thesis
dc.type.material Text
thesis.degree.department Bioengineering
thesis.degree.discipline Engineering
thesis.degree.grantor Rice University
thesis.degree.level Masters
thesis.degree.name Master of Science
dc.identifier.citation Iyer, Vijay. "A dual acousto-optic laser scanning microscope system for the study of dendritic integration: Design, construction, and preliminary results." (2003) Master’s Thesis, Rice University. https://hdl.handle.net/1911/17596.


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