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dc.contributor.advisor Engelhardt, H. Tristram, Jr.
dc.creatorDorsett, Jeremy Robert
dc.date.accessioned 2009-06-04T06:38:39Z
dc.date.available 2009-06-04T06:38:39Z
dc.date.issued 2002
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1911/17502
dc.description.abstract It has been argued that the rationing of medical resources effected by managed care organizations violates the philosophical doctrine of informed consent, which is linked to the principle of respect for patient autonomy. Two models which purport to protect patient autonomy, in consonance with the doctrine of informed consent, and in the face of institutional rationing decisions, via prior disclosure, are examined. It is found that the 'prior global consent' model is less effective at preserving patient autonomy through prior disclosure than is the 'waiver of informed consent' model. The immediate conclusion for managed care is that institutional rationing need not be antithetical to the doctrine of informed consent. The broader philosophical conclusion is that the hierarchical notion of autonomy espoused by the 'waiver' model is, in some cases, more effective than the integrated notion espoused by the 'global consent' model.
dc.format.extent 100 p.
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso eng
dc.subjectPhilosophy
Health care management
dc.title Informed consent to rationing decisions by managed care organizations
dc.type.genre Thesis
dc.type.material Text
thesis.degree.department Philosophy
thesis.degree.discipline Humanities
thesis.degree.grantor Rice University
thesis.degree.level Masters
thesis.degree.name Master of Arts
dc.identifier.citation Dorsett, Jeremy Robert. "Informed consent to rationing decisions by managed care organizations." (2002) Master’s Thesis, Rice University. https://hdl.handle.net/1911/17502.


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