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dc.contributor.advisor Aranda, Jose F., Jr.
dc.creatorHunter, David Earl, III
dc.date.accessioned 2009-06-04T08:49:42Z
dc.date.available 2009-06-04T08:49:42Z
dc.date.issued 1998
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1911/17179
dc.description.abstract Literary utopianism and naturalism present apparently polar views regarding the possibilities and limitations of human agency: the former portrays humanity as having created a communal society based upon rationality, while the latter argues that people are victims consumed by their desires. This comparative study of Edward Bellamy's Looking Backward (1888), Frank Norris' McTeague (1899), Theodore Dreiser's Sister Carrie (1900), and Frank Baum's The Wizard of Oz (1900), postulates these fictions as examinations of whether life in America at the end of the nineteenth-century is inevitably caught in state of flux or whether it is possible to attain stability. Yet these works are less interesting for their ostensibly dominant perspectives on the human condition, than for their complicating elements which elevate the works above their prevailing philosophies and prevent them from remaining mere manifestos.
dc.format.extent 104 p.
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso eng
dc.subjectComparative literature
American literature
dc.title Heaven and hell on earth: Flux and stasis in literary utopianism and naturalism
dc.type.genre Thesis
dc.type.material Text
thesis.degree.department English
thesis.degree.discipline Humanities
thesis.degree.grantor Rice University
thesis.degree.level Masters
thesis.degree.name Master of Arts
dc.identifier.citation Hunter, David Earl, III. "Heaven and hell on earth: Flux and stasis in literary utopianism and naturalism." (1998) Master’s Thesis, Rice University. https://hdl.handle.net/1911/17179.


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