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dc.contributor.advisor Bailey, Walter B.
dc.creatorDownie, Barbara Louise
dc.date.accessioned 2009-06-04T06:50:31Z
dc.date.available 2009-06-04T06:50:31Z
dc.date.issued 1997
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1911/17081
dc.description.abstract The nature of Scottish fiddle music in the mid-eighteenth century was shaped by three main factors: the social context of music-making for performer and audience, the coexisting traditions of folk and classical music, and international influences. These factors are analyzed and extensively illustrated in a detailed examination of the compositions and performing styles of two musicians; the classical style is exemplified by William McGibbon and the folk tradition by Niel Gow. The decline of Scottish music from the end of the eighteenth century is explained in terms of the limited possibilities for classical development of folk music, the rise of nationalism, and the stifling of the native idiom by a combination of these factors.
dc.format.extent 194 p.
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso eng
dc.subjectBiographies
Dance
Music
dc.title William McGibbon and Niel Gow: Reflections of tradition and taste in eighteenth-century lowland Scotland
dc.type.genre Thesis
dc.type.material Text
thesis.degree.department Music
thesis.degree.discipline Music
thesis.degree.grantor Rice University
thesis.degree.level Masters
thesis.degree.name Master of Music
dc.identifier.citation Downie, Barbara Louise. "William McGibbon and Niel Gow: Reflections of tradition and taste in eighteenth-century lowland Scotland." (1997) Master’s Thesis, Rice University. https://hdl.handle.net/1911/17081.


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