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dc.contributor.advisor Dessler, Alexander J.
dc.creatorZhan, Jie
dc.date.accessioned 2009-06-03T23:51:37Z
dc.date.available 2009-06-03T23:51:37Z
dc.date.issued 1991
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1911/16594
dc.description.abstract Strong 8-$\mu$m infrared hot spots in the polar regions of Jupiter exhibit different behaviors: the northern polar hot spot (hereafter, NPHS) tends to remain fixed in System III longitude while the southern polar hot spot (SPHS) drifts. Joule heating associated with Pedersen currents that are generated by the spinning magnetized ionosphere (the Faraday disc dynamo) is proposed as a possible power source for the hot spots. A quantitative perturbation model is used to show that the NPHS is confined by a steep longitudinal magnetic-field gradient to a System III longitude of approximately 175$\sp\circ$, in agreement with observations. The model also shows that a Joule heating power of about $10\sp{14}$-$10\sp{15}$ Watts can be dissipated in the hydrocarbon layer, significantly larger than particle-precipitation power and the radiated power of the hot spots. The drift of the SPHS is hypothesized as being caused by gravity waves. The total energy provided by Joule heating and by the dissipation of the waves constitutes the power for the hot spot; propagation of the waves causes the location of the total energy deposition to move, thus causing the drift of the SPHS. Because of the asymmetry in the polar magnetic field configurations between the two hemispheres, these gravity waves are more likely to deposit energy comparable to the Joule heating energy in the south to heat up the hydrocarbon layer where IR emission originates. The ranges of wavelength and frequency are investigated for waves that propagate mainly in north-south direction. These waves can cause the SPHS to drift at the observed speed of $\sim$5km/s and dissipate heat that is comparable to Joule heating in the south but less important than the Joule heating in the north. The current-driven joule-heating model, with the presence of wave modulation, can thus account for the primary features of the Jovian polar hot spots: their power output, the fixed location of the NPHS, and the drift motion of the SPHS.
dc.format.extent 93 p.
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso eng
dc.subjectAtmospheric sciences
Astronomy
Astrophysics
dc.title Possible power sources for the Jovian polar infrared hot spots
dc.type.genre Thesis
dc.type.material Text
thesis.degree.department Physics
thesis.degree.discipline Natural Sciences
thesis.degree.grantor Rice University
thesis.degree.level Doctoral
thesis.degree.name Doctor of Philosophy
dc.identifier.citation Zhan, Jie. "Possible power sources for the Jovian polar infrared hot spots." (1991) Diss., Rice University. https://hdl.handle.net/1911/16594.


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