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dc.contributor.advisor Stroup, John M.
dc.creatorWood, Alice L.
dc.date.accessioned 2009-06-03T23:58:18Z
dc.date.available 2009-06-03T23:58:18Z
dc.date.issued 1994
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1911/13915
dc.description.abstract Re-evaluation of the current scholarship on sainthood reveals canonization to be a process of deliberate creation by which candidates are first depicted as members of particular groups or communities and then represented as exemplary members of the Church of Rome. Collaboration among the multiple groups promoting the canonization yields saints with multiple identities who nevertheless serve as icons of consensus. This interpretation challenges the previous scholarly depiction of early modern canonization reform as the Vatican's attempt to change popular values by imposing elite models of sanctity. Instead, seventeenth-century reform, which forced communities to seek official approval for local saints, can be viewed as a unifying strategy rather than a repressive one. Scholars who emphasize the popular/elite dichotomy in religious culture or who examine only certain types of documents miss both the collaborative nature of canonizations and the importance of saints as symbols of Church cohesion.
dc.format.extent 152 p.
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso eng
dc.subjectReligious history
dc.title The discourse of sanctity: Early modern canonization of saints as a collaborative process
dc.type.genre Thesis
dc.type.material Text
thesis.degree.department Religious Studies
thesis.degree.discipline Humanities
thesis.degree.grantor Rice University
thesis.degree.level Masters
thesis.degree.name Master of Arts
dc.identifier.citation Wood, Alice L.. "The discourse of sanctity: Early modern canonization of saints as a collaborative process." (1994) Master’s Thesis, Rice University. https://hdl.handle.net/1911/13915.


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