Show simple item record

dc.creatorMinar, Rena Virginia
dc.date.accessioned 2007-05-09T18:21:47Z
dc.date.available 2007-05-09T18:21:47Z
dc.date.issued 1994
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1911/13869
dc.description.abstract The study of folk art, or self-taught art, has been riddled with problems. Scholars have not agreed on terms or definitions, and research has been sporadic. Folk art environments, large decorated sites at homes or businesses, cause further problems because these sites define space. Simon Rodia built The Watts Towers in Los Angeles, and no one knows why he built the site or why he later abruptly abandoned it. The environment he built consists of three tall spires and several other smaller structures, all covered with colorful tile mosaic. Reverend Howard Finster created Paradise Garden just outside Pennville, Georgia as a means to communicate the teachings of God. The environment, a result of religious visions, contains hundreds of sculptures and describes an area of over seven acres. These sites represent two types of folk art environments: systematic and random.
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso eng
dc.subjectFolklore
dc.title Case studies of folk art environments: Simon Rodia's "Watts Towers" and Reverend Howard Finster's "Paradise Garden" (California, Georgia)
dc.type.genre Thesis
dc.type.material Text
thesis.degree.department Art and Art History
thesis.degree.discipline Humanities
thesis.degree.grantor Rice University
thesis.degree.level Masters
thesis.degree.name Master of Arts
dc.identifier.citation Minar, Rena Virginia. "Case studies of folk art environments: Simon Rodia's "Watts Towers" and Reverend Howard Finster's "Paradise Garden" (California, Georgia)." (1994) Master’s Thesis, Rice University. https://hdl.handle.net/1911/13869.


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record