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dc.contributor.advisor Wittenberg, Gordon
dc.creatorGrenader, Nonya S.
dc.date.accessioned 2009-06-03T23:54:07Z
dc.date.available 2009-06-03T23:54:07Z
dc.date.issued 1994
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1911/13837
dc.description.abstract The porch may be seen as part of a larger typology, encompassing variations from the megaron to the dogtrot. Its typological grouping has the common characteristic of providing transition and a middle ground between interior and exterior. Traditionally, the porch was used as an escape from a hot interior, a place for socializing and gathering, and for observing the comings and goings of the street or landscape beyond. Although the original requirements of the porch have been altered, there is still the undeniable link between inside and out that the porch uniquely provides. The porch, as a frame for observation, a transitional element, a protector from the elements, and a middle ground to the larger community, may be evaluated for its historical significance and for its future relevance.
dc.format.extent 51 p.
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso eng
dc.subjectArchitecture
dc.title The porch as a middle ground
dc.type.genre Thesis
dc.type.material Text
thesis.degree.department Architecture
thesis.degree.discipline Architecture
thesis.degree.grantor Rice University
thesis.degree.level Masters
thesis.degree.name Master of Architecture
dc.identifier.citation Grenader, Nonya S.. "The porch as a middle ground." (1994) Master’s Thesis, Rice University. https://hdl.handle.net/1911/13837.


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