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dc.contributor.advisor Meade, Andrew J., Jr.
dc.creatorDay, Brad Allen
dc.date.accessioned 2009-06-04T00:04:47Z
dc.date.available 2009-06-04T00:04:47Z
dc.date.issued 1993
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1911/13802
dc.description.abstract A method is developed to solve the two-dimensional, steady, compressible, turbulent boundary-layer equations and is coupled to an existing Euler solver for attached transonic airfoil analysis problems. The boundary-layer formulation utilizes the semi-discrete Galerkin (SDG) method to model the spatial variable normal to the surface with linear finite elements and the time-like variable with finite differences. A Dorodnitsyn transformed system of equations is used to bound the infinite spatial domain thereby permitting the use of a uniform finite element grid. The second-order accurate Crank-Nicholson scheme is applied along with a linearization method to take advantage of the parabolic nature of the boundary-layer equations and generate a non-iterative marching routine. The SDG code can be applied to any smoothly-connected airfoil shape without modification and can be coupled to any inviscid flow solver. In this analysis, a direct viscous-inviscid interaction is accomplished between the Euler and boundary-layer codes through the application of a transpiration velocity boundary condition. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)
dc.format.extent 163 p.
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso eng
dc.subjectMechanical engineering
Aerospace engineering
dc.title Semi-discrete Galerkin solution of the compressible boundary-layer equations with viscous-inviscid interaction
dc.type.genre Thesis
dc.type.material Text
thesis.degree.department Mechanical Engineering
thesis.degree.discipline Engineering
thesis.degree.grantor Rice University
thesis.degree.level Masters
thesis.degree.name Master of Science
dc.identifier.citation Day, Brad Allen. "Semi-discrete Galerkin solution of the compressible boundary-layer equations with viscous-inviscid interaction." (1993) Master’s Thesis, Rice University. https://hdl.handle.net/1911/13802.


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