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dc.contributor.advisor Harcombe, Paul A.
dc.creatorLiu, Changxiang
dc.date.accessioned 2009-06-04T00:08:15Z
dc.date.available 2009-06-04T00:08:15Z
dc.date.issued 1992
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1911/13611
dc.description.abstract Patterns of vegetation in fire-prone habitats were analyzed by ordination. The results showed that vegetation was highly related to soil texture, but was not obviously related to fire history. I concluded that either fire and soil effects are confounded or fire effects have been reduced by long-time fire suppression. Indicators of site productivity--height and volume increment of loblolly pine, and stand basal area--were weakly related to vegetation type, but not related to soil texture. The lack of a relationship between these indicators and soil texture suggests that site productivity may not be related simply to soil texture and that interactions with other species may obscure the response of loblolly pine to site productivity. The flammable portion of fine fuel was higher in dry types than in wet types which is consistent with the hypothesis that fire effects will be greater in dry types than in wet types.
dc.format.extent 114 p.
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso eng
dc.subjectEcology
dc.title Patterns of vegetation in fire-prone habitats, southeastern Texas, United States
dc.type.genre Thesis
dc.type.material Text
thesis.degree.department Biology
thesis.degree.discipline Natural Sciences
thesis.degree.grantor Rice University
thesis.degree.level Masters
thesis.degree.name Master of Science
dc.identifier.citation Liu, Changxiang. "Patterns of vegetation in fire-prone habitats, southeastern Texas, United States." (1992) Master’s Thesis, Rice University. https://hdl.handle.net/1911/13611.


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