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dc.contributor.advisor Waldman, Peter
dc.creatorFielder, Lisa Peyton
dc.date.accessioned 2009-06-04T00:12:46Z
dc.date.available 2009-06-04T00:12:46Z
dc.date.issued 1991
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1911/13552
dc.description.abstract In order to abet the integration of the disparate cultural groups of an international preparatory school into a cohesive student body, an architect must initially discover some language common to all of the students. The language which is most easily understood by everyone is that of universal myth and archetype. The myth of initiation, from which the modern educational system is a direct descendant, includes a large set of architectural symbolisms which are common to all cultures, and which were originally derived from natural imagery. These symbols include immutable archetypal forms. Though the archetypes retain their ability to communicate with all mankind, the symbolic means by which they are commonly represented has been rendered ineffective by centuries of transmigration. In order to create a meaningful architecture for today, the architect must return to the mythical and natural origins of his art and draw from these a new means of representing the archetypes. Only by so doing can he gain the ability to instigate a universal dialogue.
dc.format.extent 134 p.
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso eng
dc.subjectArchitecture
dc.title The Gossamer Cloak
dc.type.genre Thesis
dc.type.material Text
thesis.degree.department Architecture
thesis.degree.discipline Architecture
thesis.degree.grantor Rice University
thesis.degree.level Masters
thesis.degree.name Master of Architecture
dc.identifier.citation Fielder, Lisa Peyton. "The Gossamer Cloak." (1991) Master’s Thesis, Rice University. https://hdl.handle.net/1911/13552.


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