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dc.contributor.advisor Von der Mehden, Fred R.
dc.creatorCampbell, Sally Howard
dc.date.accessioned 2009-06-03T23:54:59Z
dc.date.available 2009-06-03T23:54:59Z
dc.date.issued 1990
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1911/13419
dc.description.abstract During the Vietnam War period, the Japanese defense budget grew eight-fold, from 158 billion yen in 1960 to 1367 billion yen in 1975. In spite of the opposition parties' aversion to growth in the military, little was heard in the way of protests to such growth. In this political system where consensus decision-making dominates, it is unusual not to hear accusations of "tyranny of the majority" when the opposition is shut out of decision making, as was the case with the 1960 Treaty Crisis. However, the growing Japanese economy allowed the LDP to satisfy its desire for increased funds for the military while at the same time appeasing the opposition by restricting the defense budget's percentage of GNP to a minimum. The combination of a tradition of consensus decision making, the desire to avoid a political crisis and an expanding economy led to the ability to reach a minimum consensus on this very divided issue in Japanese politics.
dc.format.extent 87 p.
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso eng
dc.subjectPolitical science
Economics
dc.title Consensus politics and Japanese defense budget policy, 1960-1975
dc.type.genre Thesis
dc.type.material Text
thesis.degree.department Economics
thesis.degree.discipline Social Sciences
thesis.degree.grantor Rice University
thesis.degree.level Masters
thesis.degree.name Master of Arts
dc.identifier.citation Campbell, Sally Howard. "Consensus politics and Japanese defense budget policy, 1960-1975." (1990) Master’s Thesis, Rice University. https://hdl.handle.net/1911/13419.


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