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dc.contributor.authorSoriano, Sirena
Curry, Kristen
Wang, Qi
Chow, Elsbeth
Treangen, Todd J.
Villapol, Sonia
dc.date.accessioned 2022-04-28T14:29:05Z
dc.date.available 2022-04-28T14:29:05Z
dc.date.issued 2022
dc.identifier.citation Soriano, Sirena, Curry, Kristen, Wang, Qi, et al.. "Fecal Microbiota Transplantation Derived from Alzheimer’s Disease Mice Worsens Brain Trauma Outcomes in Wild-Type Controls." International Journal of Molecular Sciences, 23, no. 9 (2022) MDPI: https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms23094476.
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1911/112187
dc.description.abstract Traumatic brain injury (TBI) causes neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration, both of which increase the risk and accelerate the progression of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The gut microbiome is an essential modulator of the immune system, impacting the brain. AD has been related with reduced diversity and alterations in the community composition of the gut microbiota. This study aimed to determine whether the gut microbiota from AD mice exacerbates neurological deficits after TBI in control mice. We prepared fecal microbiota transplants from 18 to 24 month old 3×Tg-AD (FMT-AD) and from healthy control (FMT-young) mice. FMTs were administered orally to young control C57BL/6 (wild-type, WT) mice after they underwent controlled cortical impact (CCI) injury, as a model of TBI. Then, we characterized the microbiota composition of the fecal samples by full-length 16S rRNA gene sequencing analysis. We collected the blood, brain, and gut tissues for protein and immunohistochemical analysis. Our results showed that FMT-AD administration stimulates a higher relative abundance of the genus Muribaculum and a decrease in Lactobacillus johnsonii compared to FMT-young in WT mice. Furthermore, WT mice exhibited larger lesion, increased activated microglia/macrophages, and reduced motor recovery after FMT-AD compared to FMT-young one day after TBI. In summary, we observed gut microbiota from AD mice to have a detrimental effect and aggravate the neuroinflammatory response and neurological outcomes after TBI in young WT mice.
dc.language.iso eng
dc.publisher MDPI
dc.rights This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.title Fecal Microbiota Transplantation Derived from Alzheimer’s Disease Mice Worsens Brain Trauma Outcomes in Wild-Type Controls
dc.type Journal article
dc.citation.journalTitle International Journal of Molecular Sciences
dc.citation.volumeNumber 23
dc.citation.issueNumber 9
dc.identifier.digital ijms-23-04476
dc.type.dcmi Text
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.3390/ijms23094476
dc.type.publication publisher version
dc.citation.articleNumber 4476


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