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dc.contributor.authorLi, Wenrao
Wang, Luwei
Tian, Baoliang
Ding, Jianqing
Siemann, Evan
dc.date.accessioned 2020-11-17T19:44:48Z
dc.date.available 2020-11-17T19:44:48Z
dc.date.issued 2020
dc.identifier.citation Li, Wenrao, Wang, Luwei, Tian, Baoliang, et al.. "Introduced Populations of an Invasive Tree Have Higher Soluble Sugars but Lower Starch and Cellulose." Frontiers in Plant Science, 11, (2020) Frontiers: https://doi.org/10.3389/fpls.2020.587414.
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1911/109570
dc.description.abstract Native and introduced plant populations vary in leaf physiology, biochemistry, and biotic interactions. These aboveground traits may help invasive plants in competition for resources with co-occurring native species. Root physiological traits may affect invasive plant performance because of the roles of roots in resource absorption. The aim of this study was to test this prediction, using invasive Chinese tallow tree (Triadica sebifera), as a model species. Here we examined carbohydrate (soluble sugar, sucrose, fructose, starch, and cellulose) concentrations and the mass of roots, stems, and leaves, along with root water potential and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) colonization of soil-cultured T. sebifera seedlings from 10 native (China) and 10 introduced (United States) populations in a common garden. Introduced populations had a significantly greater stem and leaf mass than native populations but their root masses did not differ, so they had lower R:S. Introduced populations had higher soluble sugar concentrations but lower starch and cellulose concentrations in their leaves, stems, and roots. Introduced populations had more negative root water potentials and higher AMF colonization. Together, our results indicate that invasive plants shift their carbohydrate allocation, leading to faster growth and a greater aboveground allocation strategy. Higher AMF colonization and more negative water potential in invasive plants likely facilitate more efficient water absorption by the roots. Thus, such physiological variation in root characteristics could play a role in plant invasion success.
dc.language.iso eng
dc.publisher Frontiers
dc.rights This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner(s) are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.title Introduced Populations of an Invasive Tree Have Higher Soluble Sugars but Lower Starch and Cellulose
dc.type Journal article
dc.citation.journalTitle Frontiers in Plant Science
dc.citation.volumeNumber 11
dc.type.dcmi Text
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.3389/fpls.2020.587414
dc.type.publication publisher version
dc.citation.articleNumber 587414


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