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dc.contributor.advisor Gorman, Bridget
dc.creatorTuthill, Zelma L
dc.date.accessioned 2020-08-11T21:48:24Z
dc.date.available 2021-08-01T05:01:13Z
dc.date.created 2020-08
dc.date.issued 2020-08-05
dc.date.submitted August 2020
dc.identifier.citation Tuthill, Zelma L. "Marginalized Within the Margins: Minority Status, Identity Centrality and Wellbeing." (2020) Diss., Rice University. https://hdl.handle.net/1911/109180.
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1911/109180
dc.description.abstract Mounting evidence highlights how stressors related to stigma associated with sexual minority identity contribute to poorer wellbeing and unhealthy coping behaviors among sexual minority adults (Meyer 2003). Work on identity also documents how aspects of identity related processes, including identity centrality, shape coping and wellbeing for people with marginalized or stigmatized identities (Umana-Taylor et al. 2015;Fuligi, Witkow and Garcia 2005; Chavous et al. 2003). Missing are examinations that consider how identity centrality shapes how people with more than one marginalized identity experience and cope with minority stressors. To fill this gap, this dissertation examines the role of identity centrality in the relationship between minority stressors and wellbeing. In the first empirical chapter, I use a mixed method approach and draw on 25 in depth interviews in addition to an analysis of secondary data from the Social Justice Sexuality Project (SJSP) to examine the relationship between identity centrality and exposure to minority stressors among Black and Latino/a sexual minority adults. My findings illuminate how minority stressors from gendered, heterosexist and racialized experiences shape perceptions of identity centrality across social position. In the second empirical chapter, I utilize the SJSP and apply an intercategorical intersectional approach (McCall 2005) to examine how both sexual and racial/ethnic identity centrality shape wellbeing. I found a significant association between identity centrality and both mental wellbeing and smoking status. However, I did not find evidence of a significant association between identity centrality and physical health status. In the third empirical chapter, I again use a mixed method approach to examine patterns of social support and community integration among Black and Latino/a sexual minority adults. My results emphasize the importance of both racial/ethnic and sexual identity centrality in shaping patterns of support and integration across social position. I found evidence that both sexual and racial/ethnic identity centrality were significantly associated with perceived family support and feelings of connectedness to the LGBT community. In terms of community involvement, I show that sexual identity centrality was significantly associated with involvement in the LGBT community while racial/ethnic identity centrality was significantly associated with involvement in the POC community. My interview findings also highlight that family is not the only supportive option for sexual minorities of color. Various respondents adapted to limited familial support by strategically seeking support from family through reframing of sexual identity stressors, relying on certain supportive family members or seeking support from other relationships in their networks including friendships, community ties and significant others. Overall, my findings suggest that identity centrality is an important component of the minority stress process that has significant implications for how sexual minorities of color experience and cope with minority stressors.
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso eng
dc.subjectHealth
LGBT
Minority Stress, Intersectionality
dc.title Marginalized Within the Margins: Minority Status, Identity Centrality and Wellbeing
dc.type Thesis
dc.date.updated 2020-08-11T21:48:24Z
dc.type.material Text
thesis.degree.department Sociology
thesis.degree.discipline Social Sciences
thesis.degree.grantor Rice University
thesis.degree.level Doctoral
thesis.degree.name Doctor of Philosophy
dc.embargo.terms 2021-08-01


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