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dc.contributor.authorO'Connell, Heather
Howell, Junia
dc.date.accessioned 2019-03-05T21:04:00Z
dc.date.available 2019-03-05T21:04:00Z
dc.date.issued 2016
dc.identifier.citation O'Connell, Heather and Howell, Junia. "Disparate City: Understanding Rising Levels of Concentrated Poverty and Affluence in Greater Houston." (2016) Rice University Kinder Institute for Urban Research: https://doi.org/10.25611/s8s0-egss.
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1911/105200
dc.description.abstract The poverty rate of Harris County, which surrounds Houston, rose from 10 percent in 1980 to 17 percent in 2014. That alone is a troubling trend, but equally concerning is the increasing tendency in the Houston area for that poverty to be highly concentrated. Economic segregation appears to be tightening its grip on Harris County and the area’s neighborhoods are increasingly economically polarized. There is a declining number of middle-class neighborhoods in the region, and Greater Houston is experiencing an increasingly stark division between the “haves” and “have nots.”
dc.language.iso eng
dc.publisher Rice University Kinder Institute for Urban Research
dc.relation.urihttps://kinder.rice.edu/research/disparate-city-understanding-rising-levels-concentrated-poverty-and-affluence-greater
dc.rights Copyright ©2016 by Rice University Kinder Institute for Urban Research. All rights reserved.
dc.title Disparate City: Understanding Rising Levels of Concentrated Poverty and Affluence in Greater Houston
dc.type Report
dc.identifier.digital KI_2016_DISPARATE_CITY
dc.type.dcmi Text
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.25611/s8s0-egss


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