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dc.contributor.advisor Cannady, William T.
dc.creatorBleck, Robert Frank
dc.date.accessioned 2018-12-18T21:35:05Z
dc.date.available 2018-12-18T21:35:05Z
dc.date.issued 1984
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1911/104911
dc.description.abstract The environment is composed of many parts. Growth occurs through the incremental addition of new parts. During this process there is a desire on the part of the architect to establish order in the environment through a process of unification. Unity is a metaphysical concept. It is the essential quality needed to give man orientation to the human experience. During the modern movement it was popular to articulate the various elements of a building. The walls were separated from the ceilings, structure was independent from elements of enclosure, and the buildings themselves were often separated from the ground. The result is an architecture consisting of various juxtaposed parts. In reaction to this attitude, I propose an architecture which celebrates connections rather than revealing them, resulting in a synthetic rather than analytic expression of the meeting of the architectonic elements. Of course, not all built elements need to be or should be tangibly connected. Many elements are truly independent and need to be physically separated. For these cases, 1 propose the use of implied connections to accommodate both the physical needs of separation and the psychological needs of unity. Through the use of both celebrated and implied connections I intend to exploit both the dependent and independent systems in architecture.
dc.format.extent 28 pp
dc.language.iso eng
dc.title Connections in architecture
dc.identifier.digital RICE2562
dc.contributor.committeeMember Waldman, Peter
dc.type.genre Thesis
dc.type.material Text
thesis.degree.department Architecture
thesis.degree.discipline Architecture
thesis.degree.grantor Rice University
thesis.degree.level Masters
thesis.degree.name Master of Architecture
dc.format.digitalOrigin reformatted digital
dc.identifier.callno Design Thesis Arch. 1984 Bleck
dc.identifier.citation Bleck, Robert Frank. "Connections in architecture." (1984) Master’s Thesis, Rice University. https://hdl.handle.net/1911/104911.


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