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dc.contributor.advisor Sims, James R.
dc.creatorJohnson, Delbert Benjamin
dc.date.accessioned 2018-12-18T21:20:19Z
dc.date.available 2018-12-18T21:20:19Z
dc.date.issued 1955
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1911/104281
dc.description.abstract Presented in this thesis is a summary of Houston subsoils data as obtained from geological considerations and a substantial portion of the available records of test borings and soils tests. From this summary, the following observations may be made. The subsoils of Houston consist of clays, fine sands and silts which were deposited by water during late Pleistocene time and Recent time. Recent deposits are found only along streams; all other soils are Pleistocene. Clay deposits make up the predominant soil type. Clays may contain large percentages of silt and sand which measurably alter their physical properties. Depending on the quantity of sand which a clay possesses, it may be classified as either sandy or plastic. Sandy clays usually possess high internal friction as well as cohesive strength. Stiff plastic clays possess variable internal friction and are characteristically jointed or fissured, a fact which often alters the results of compressive tests. Sand deposits appear as lenses which are often interbedded in more extensive strata of clay. These deposits consist chiefly of fine to very fine sands and often contain appreciable amounts of silt. Relative densities of the sands vary from loose to dense.
dc.format.extent 77 pp
dc.language.iso eng
dc.title Engineering properties of Houston subsoils
dc.identifier.digital RICE1913
dc.type.genre Thesis
dc.type.material Text
thesis.degree.department Civil Engineering
thesis.degree.discipline Engineering
thesis.degree.grantor Rice University
thesis.degree.level Masters
thesis.degree.name Master of Science
dc.format.digitalOrigin reformatted digital
dc.identifier.callno THESIS C.E. 1955 JOHNSON
dc.identifier.citation Johnson, Delbert Benjamin. "Engineering properties of Houston subsoils." (1955) Master’s Thesis, Rice University. https://hdl.handle.net/1911/104281.


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