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dc.contributor.authorCosta, Thiago Leiros
Orsten-Hooge, Kimberley
Rêgo, Gabriel Gaudêncio
Wagemans, Johan
Pomerantz, James R.
Boggio, Paulo Sérgio
dc.date.accessioned 2018-11-12T15:40:03Z
dc.date.available 2018-11-12T15:40:03Z
dc.date.issued 2018
dc.identifier.citation Costa, Thiago Leiros, Orsten-Hooge, Kimberley, Rêgo, Gabriel Gaudêncio, et al.. "Neural Signatures of the Configural Superiority Effect and Fundamental Emergent Features in Human Vision." Scientific Reports, 8, (2018) Springer Nature: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-018-32289-2.
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1911/103326
dc.description.abstract The concepts of grouping, emergence, and superadditivity (when a whole is qualitatively different from the sum of its parts) are critical in Gestalt psychology and essential to properly understand the information processing mechanisms underlying visual perception. However, very little is known about the neural processes behind these phenomena (particularly in terms of their generality vs. specificity and their time-course). Here, we used the configural superiority effect as a way to define "emergence" and "emergent features" operationally, employing an approach that can isolate different emergent features and compare them on a common scale. By assessing well-established event related potentials in a HD-EEG system, we found that the critical processes behind configural superiority and superadditive Gestalt phenomena are present in the window between 100 and 200 ms after stimulus onset and that these effects seem to be driven by specific attentional selection mechanisms. Also, some emergent features seem to be differentially processed in different brain hemispheres. These results shed new light on the issues of the generality vs. specificity of the neural correlates of different Gestalt principles, the hemispheric asymmetries in the processing of hierarchical image structure and the role of the N1 ERP component in reflecting feature selective mechanisms.
dc.language.iso eng
dc.publisher Springer Nature
dc.rights This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder.
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.title Neural Signatures of the Configural Superiority Effect and Fundamental Emergent Features in Human Vision
dc.type Journal article
dc.citation.journalTitle Scientific Reports
dc.citation.volumeNumber 8
dc.identifier.digital s41598-018-32289-2
dc.type.dcmi Text
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-018-32289-2
dc.identifier.pmcid PMC6141526
dc.identifier.pmid 30224676
dc.type.publication publisher version
dc.citation.articleNumber 13954


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This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder.