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dc.contributor.authorEberhart-Phillips, Luke J.
Küpper, Clemens
Carmona-Isunza, María Cristina
Vincze, Orsolya
Zefania, Sama
Cruz-López, Medardo
Kosztolányi, András
Miller, Tom E.X.
Barta, Zoltán
Cuthill, Innes C.
Burke, Terry
Székely, Tamás
Hoffman, Joseph I.
Krüger, Oliver
dc.date.accessioned 2018-08-17T13:36:23Z
dc.date.available 2018-08-17T13:36:23Z
dc.date.issued 2018
dc.identifier.citation Eberhart-Phillips, Luke J., Küpper, Clemens, Carmona-Isunza, María Cristina, et al.. "Demographic causes of adult sex ratio variation and their consequences for parental cooperation." Nature Communications, 9, (2018) Springer Nature: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-018-03833-5.
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1911/102468
dc.description.abstract The adult sex ratio (ASR) is a fundamental concept in population biology, sexual selection, and social evolution. However, it remains unclear which demographic processes generate ASR variation and how biases in ASR in turn affect social behaviour. Here, we evaluate the demographic mechanisms shaping ASR and their potential consequences for parental cooperation using detailed survival, fecundity, and behavioural data on 6119 individuals from six wild shorebird populations exhibiting flexible parental strategies. We show that these closely related populations express strikingly different ASRs, despite having similar ecologies and life histories, and that ASR variation is largely driven by sex differences in the apparent survival of juveniles. Furthermore, families in populations with biased ASRs were predominantly tended by a single parent, suggesting that parental cooperation breaks down with unbalanced sex ratios. Taken together, our results indicate that sex biases emerging during early life have profound consequences for social behaviour.
dc.language.iso eng
dc.publisher Springer Nature
dc.rights This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder.
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.title Demographic causes of adult sex ratio variation and their consequences for parental cooperation
dc.type Journal article
dc.citation.journalTitle Nature Communications
dc.citation.volumeNumber 9
dc.identifier.digital s41467-018-03833-5
dc.type.dcmi Text
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-018-03833-5
dc.identifier.pmcid PMC5917032
dc.identifier.pmid 29695803
dc.type.publication publisher version
dc.citation.articleNumber 1651


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This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder.