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dc.contributor.authorRatnoff, David
dc.contributor.illustrator Williamson, Frances
dc.date.accessioned 2018-06-07T13:16:27Z
dc.date.available 2018-06-07T13:16:27Z
dc.date.issued 2018
dc.identifier.citation Ratnoff, David. Williamson, Frances (illustrator). "Race, Labor, and Class in Interwar New York." Rice Historical Review, 3, no. Spring (2018) Rice University: 21-34. https://doi.org/10.25611/9ppr-zs19.
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1911/101531
dc.description This paper was written in The Evolving American City (HIST 410), taught by Dr. Shelton.
dc.description.abstract Black urban politics in New York City blossomed as black migrants found employment in the industrial North during the Great Migration. Publishing its first issue in 1917, the black radical newspaper the Messenger, sought to raise race and-class consciousness among its readership. Heralding the “New Negro,” the Messenger promoted Socialist politics and encouraged trade unionism. An important interlocutor with other black periodicals, the Messenger argued that racial advancement was predicated on class consciousness and labor organization. Yet the Messenger’s short lifespan reflected the limits of Socialist politics as a vehicle for black political mobilization.
dc.description.sponsorship Rice History Department
dc.format.extent 14 pp
dc.language.iso eng
dc.publisher Rice University
dc.relation.IsPartOfSeries Spring 2018
dc.title Race, Labor, and Class in Interwar New York
dc.type Journal article
dc.citation.journalTitle Rice Historical Review
dc.citation.volumeNumber 3
dc.citation.issueNumber Spring
dc.identifier.digital Ratnoff-RHR-2018-Spring
dc.type.dcmi Text
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.25611/9ppr-zs19
dc.citation.firstpage 21
dc.citation.lastpage 34


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