U.S.S. Adams logbook [Digital Version]

Bibliographic Information

Gibbons, John H., Midshipman, U.S.S. Adams logbook (1879-1881)

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Title: U.S.S. Adams logbook [Digital Version]
Funding from: Funding for the creation of this digitized text is provided by a grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services.
Author: Gibbons, John H., Midshipman
Statements of responsibility:
  • Creation of digital images: Center for Digital Scholarship, Rice University
  • Creation of transcription: Woodson Research Center
  • Conversion to TEI-conformant markup: Woodson Research Center
  • Parsing and proofing: Fondren Library, Rice University
  • Subject analysis and assignment of taxonomy terms: Alice Rhoades
Publisher: Rice University, Houston, Texas
Publication date: 2010-06-07
Identifier: aa00181
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Notes:
Digitization: Page images of the original document are included. Images exist as archived TIFF files, JPEG versions for general use, and thumbnail GIFs.
Provenance: This logbook was purchased from Cedric Robinsons in 1955 with the Friends of Fondren fund (Whittington gift).
Description: Logbook of a cruise of the U.S.S. Adams along the Pacific coast of Central and South America from December 1, 1879 to February 23, 1881, kept by Cadet-Midshipman John H. Gibbons. Pages at the back of this logbook which are completely blank were not captured and do not appear in this digital representation. ((handwritten)
Source(s): Gibbons, John H., Midshipman, U.S.S. Adams logbook (1879-1881)
Source Identifier: U.S.S. Adams logbook, 1879-1881, MS 235, Woodson Research Center, Fondren Library, Rice University.
Description of the project: This digitized text is part of the Our Americas Archive Partnership (OAAP) project.
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This text has been encoded based on recommendations from Level 4 of the TEI in Libraries Guidelines. Any comments on editorial decisions for this document are included in footnotes within the document with the author of the note indicated. All digitized texts have been verified against the original document. Quotation marks have been retained. For printed documents: Original grammar, punctuation, and spelling have been preserved. No corrections or normalizations have been made, except that hyphenated, non-compound words that appear at the end of lines have been closed up to facilitate searching and retrieval. For manuscript documents: Original grammar, punctuation, and spelling have been preserved. We have recorded normalizations using the reg element to facilitate searchability, but these normalizations may not be visible in the reading version of this electronic text
Languages used in the text: English
Text classification
Keywords: Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus
  • Ships' Logs
Keywords: Library of Congress Subject Headings
  • Adams (Steamer)
  • United States--History--1865-1898
  • Merchant mariners--United States--Diaries
Keywords: Getty Thesaurus of Geographic Names
  • Central America (general region)
  • South America (continent)

Contents




110


Journal




J.H. Gibbons.

U.S.N



Journal:
John H. Gibbons
Cadet Midn.Midshipman
USNUnited States Navy

Aug.August 12. 1879


1

Journal

In obedience to orders received from the
Navy Department, I reported for duty on
board the U.S.S. Adams, on August 12th. 1879.
Upon that date the Adams received an almost
entirely new detail of officers, the old officers
being detached. The list of officers as completed
is as follows:-
  • Comdr.Commander J. A. Howell, Commanding
  • Lt.Lieutenant Comdr.Commander D. W. Mullan, Executive Officer
  • Lt.Lieutenant J.C. Morong Navigator
  • Lt.Lieutenant Harry Rusk, Senior Watch Officer
  • Lt.Lieutenant G. Blocklinger, Watch Officer
  • Lt.Lieutenant C. G. Bowman doditto
  • Master F.W. Nabor doditto
  • Ensign F.W. Coffin doditto
  • Cadet MidnMidshipman H.S. Chase
  • “ CW Jurgen
  • JnoJohn Gibson
  • JstJustin Gibbons
  • Chief Engineer E. J. Whittaker
  • P. A. Engineer Geo. George W. Hall
  • Asst.Assistant Engineer Stacey Poets
  • “ “ Isaac K. Reeves
  • P.A. Surgeon D.M. Dickenson
  • Asst.Assistant Paym'rPaymaster G. M. Allen
  • 2d LieutLieutenant of Marines Geo. George Bates.
  • Boatswain Wm. Frary
  • Carpenter Wm. Carter
Comdr.Commander Howell had relieved Comdr.Commander Rodgers of
the command. The latter brought the vessel
from the North Atlantic Squadron through
the Straits of Magellan to the Pacific Squadron.
The following is a brief description of the
Adams, her hull, spans, sails, plan of
decks &c &c.

2

U.S.S. Adams (3d Rate)

Built at Boston, Mass. by contract, in 1876
Launched in the spring of that year and
went into commission July 21. 1876

Dimensions
Length between perpendiculars 184 ft
Extreme breadth 33 " 10in
Tonnage 615 tons
Displacement in tons 1375 "
Extreme draught of water forward 14 ft 3in
dodittododittododitto aft 16 " 5 "

Rig
Bark, without royal yards. Topmasts and
to'gallanttopgallant masts in one. No studding sails.


Dimensions of Spans
length head
Main mast (1) above decks (2) total 68’83 11’10”
Main topmast 33' diam.diameter
11"
Main to’gallanttopgallant mast 20' 7 1/2" added
6'-4"
Main yard 66' 16 1/8" 2'-6"
top'sltopsail yard 51’-6” 12 1/8” 4’-3”
togall'ttopgallant yard 33’-6” 7 ¾” 1’-8”
Fore mastRegularized:Foremast, (1) above decks (2) total (1) 63' (2) 78' head
11'
“ topmast 30’ 08” 10 ¼ "
togallanttopgallant mast 18’ 08” 7 1/8 “ added
6’
“ yard 61’ 06” 15 1/8 “ included
2’ – 04”
“ tops’l topsail yard 48’ 11 7/8 4’
togallanttopgallant yard 31’ 03” 7” 1’ 08”
Mizzen mast, (1) above decks (2) total (1)60’-3’’ (2) 67’ 05” 9’ 3”
“ topmast 26’ – 6 1/8 “ 9”
togallanttopgallant mast 15’_5 1/2“ added
5'
Bowsprit. (1) out board (2) total (1)25’-06” (2)40’. 6” 23"
Jib boom “ “ 21'-00" 37'.10" 12" included
1'-6"
Flying “ _ “ “ 17’ 38’ 7” 2’ – 8”
Fore and main gaffs 30’ 7” added
1’-6”
Spanker " 29’ 8” 4’-6”
“ boom 42' 10 ½ “ 1’ – 0”

3

Martingale 12’ 06’’ 6 ¼’’ 1’ – 6’
Rake of foremast 3 1/2 o
“ “ main mast 4 o
“ “ mizzen mast 4 3/4o
Sleve “ bowsprit 20 o

Total Sail Area
Fifteen thousand (15 000) square feet


Battery
One 60 pdrpounder Parrott Rifle, pivot, on Tqt.Top quarterforecastle
“ 11 inch [Illegible: Survoth]-fore, pivot.
Four 9 " " " Broadside.
One 12 pdrpounder Howitzer (boat gun)
“ Gatling Gun


Small Arms
Remington Rifles. Remington Pistols

Torpedoes
Four torpedo spars. One torpedo apparatus.


Boats
One Steam Cutter
" First "
" Second "
" Third "
" Whale boat
" Gig
" Dingy
" One men bolsa


Bulk heads.Regularized:Bulkheads
There are two water tight bulk headsRegularized:bulkheads. Handles
for working gate of forward one are in the
prisoner’s cell; handles for working after one
in forward end of fire room.


Insert

SALUT!..

[1] A. M. M. les Officiers de la Corvette Américaine "alliance"
à l'occasion de leur reception au "Cercle Du Commerce"
de la Pointe-à-Pitre, le Dimanche 16 Mars 1884.

Salut!... bannière aux Etoiles,
La bienvenue où tu parais!..
Salut, où t'ont conduit tes voiles,
Salut sur notre sol français!...
Salut, américains..... nos frères,
Nobles fils de la Liberté!...
Salut fils du sol où nos pères
Firent: "Le Peuple-Royauté"!....
Salut à la belle Corvette
Des descendants de Washington!
Les descendants de Lafayette
Sont frères des fils de l'Hudson!...
Votre "Alliance" est bien nominée
Et la bienvenue en nos eaux,
Car notre France bien-aimée
Aime à voir unis nos drapeaux!
A notre brise tropicale,
Bannières, déployez-vous!....
Tous les miroitements d'opale,
D'azur et d'or, flottez sur nous!....
L'Amérique a plus de richesse
Que n'en a l'Inde des Rajahs;
La "Liberté" c'est sa Désse:
Pour l'Amérique: "Trois Hurrahs"!....
Salut!... bannière aux Etoiles,
La bienvenue où tu parais!...
Salut où t'ont conduit tes voiles,
Salut sur notre sol francais!....

-Gabriel Anciaux

Ponte à Pitre, (Guadeloupe)
16 Mars 1884


[Plans]


4


[Figure] PLAN OF SPAR DECK
[Description of figure: hand drawn image of boat layout-full page]


5


[Figure] PLAN OF BERTH DECK
[Description of figure: hand drawn image of boat layout-full page]


6


[Figure] PLAN OF HOLD
[Description of figure: hand drawn image of boat layout-full page]


7

Complements of the USS Adams

Boatswain’s Mates 2 WardRoom Steward 1
Gunners " 1 ” ” Cook 1
Quarter Masters 3 Steerage Steward 1
Coxswains 3 " Cook 1
Captain's Fo'castleForecastle 2 Warrant Officer Steward 1
” Tops 4 " Cook 1
” Afterguard 2 Bugler 1
Quarter Gunners 2 Tailor 1
Carpenter’s Mates 1 Schoolmaster 1
Sailmakers doditto 1 Total 178
Machinists 4 Marines 25
Boiler workers 1 203
Coppersmith 1
Armorer 1
Captain of Hold 1
Ship's Cook 1
Cooper 1
Carpenters or Caulkers 2
Nurse 1
Seamen 4
Ord.Ordinary Seamen 6
For Servts. Landsmen 8
" Cooks 7
Boys 13
1st C.Class Firemen 8
2nd " 7
LdoLimited Duty Officer Eng.Engineer Force 12
Yeoman 1
Master at Arms 1
Apothecary 1
PaymrsPaymaster's Yeomen 1
Jack of Dust 1
Engr.Engineer Yeomen 1
Ship's Writer 1
Cabin Steward 1
" Cook 1

8

[Ship Machinery]

The Engines

The engine is a back-acting compound screw -
engine. Indicated Horse Power 800

There are two cylinders, the high and the low
pressure. Diameter of high pressure cylinder 34 inches
and of low pressure, 51 inches. Each cylinder
is steam jacketed and provided with an
independent expansion valve, adjustable
while the engine is in motion to cut off between
the limits of 1/8 and 3/4 of the stroke of the
piston The jackets are inclosed in and form part
of the receiver, to which are attached the valve-
chests. The receiver is to have a capacity equal
to that of the large cylinder. The high pressure
steam chest is fitted with a disc stop-valve
for admitting or excluding steam. The main
slide valves are worked by means of eccentrics
and Stephenson links, acting through two arms
and a rock shaft. The expansion-valve is
operated by a separate eccentric, acting through
an arm mounted on the main-value rock
shaft. The high pressure piston has one
piston rod secured to a cross-tail, which
is coupled to the cross-head by two side rods.
one above and one below the crank-shaft.
The cross-tails run on guides made on the pillow-
block frames. The low pressure piston has two
piston rods arrayed and coupled with the cross
head in the same manner as described for
the high pressure piston. The cross-heads run
in self lubricating channel-ways made in the
pump chests. The connecting rods return from
the cross-head to the crank-pins. The crank
shaft is made with two cranks at right
angles to each other; the forward crank is
forged solid, but the after one is built up
and made with counter balances.


9

The shaft is mounted on three journals and
is united to the line shafting by a disengaging
coupling. The crank-shaft pillow-block frames
connect the cylinders with the air and circulating
pump-chests Directly opposite the
cylinders are the two chests containing the air
and circulating pumps, fresh and salt-water
reservoirs, valve-chambers and channel-ways,
and valve chambers for feed and bilge pumps.
The forward chest is to contain the air and
feed pumps; the after chest the circulating and
bilge-pumps. Each pump is horizontal and
worked direct by arms on the side rods. The
air and circulating pumps are double-acting;
the fuel and bilge pumps, single acting. The
hot well has relief valves, arranged to deliver
into channel-way leading to the out-board
delivery valve. The condenser is a Servell
surface condenser, with a cooling surface of
2700 square feet. It has 1788 tubes. It rests
upon the air and circulating pump chests.
with which it is connected by suitable openings.
The condenser tubes run fore and aft;
Steam exhausts into the condenser through one
pipe placed over the center pillow-block frame.

Boilers


There are 8 boilers of the cylindrical-return-
horizontal-tube type Each boiler is 8 feet
1 inch long. They are placed forward of the
engines, in pairs opposite Each other, the fire
room between them being 8 feet in width. The
center of the after pair of boilers is placed 13
feet forward of the center line of the engine.
The uptakes connect with a single telescopic
smoke-pipe, which is 60 ft high above the
grate when hoisted. The diameter of Each
boiler is 8 feet.


10

Each boiler has a grate surface of 54” x 64”.
The return tubes are of brass and are 119
in number for each boiler. Length, 6 feet 4 inches
Diameter 2 ½ inches. The heads of the boilers
are braced by means of eighteen (18) rods, 1 ¼ inches in diameter.

Auxiliary Pumps


There are two auxiliary, horizontal tapper
steam pumps, having water cylinders 5 inches
in diameter, with 10 inch stroke. They are fitted
for fire engines, feed and bilge pumps, and
connected with the water side of the condenser
There is also a special pump for fresh-water
distilling apparatus.

Screw Propeller

Diameter 14 feet. Four blades. Pitch 19 feet
Thickness of blade or hub. 7 inches. At periphery,
½ inch. Diameter of hub at forward end-18 inches
and at after end- 14 inches; at center, 20 inches
Length of hub 27 inches. Blades curve back 12
inches.


11

Surveys and Repairs.


After the new detail of officers had entered
upon their duties it was found necessary
to clear the ship of the various stores in
order to facilitate repairs and also to have them
surveyed. The construction, equipment, navigation,
ordinance, steam engineering, medical and
paymaster’s stores were removed to the buildings
of the various departments.

The commanding officer called for surveys
on the hull, span, sails, riggings, boats, stores
&c. The surveys were held and such repairs
as were recommended and approved were
soon after commenced.

The "Adams" went into the floating sectional
dry dock, Sep. 22, 1879. A description of the dock
and method of docking is given in subsequent
pages.

While in dry dock, the outside planking was
replaced from the sheer strake to three or four
strakes below the water line. The rotten outside planking
which was removed was of white oak; but it was
replaced by planking of Oregon Pine. The keel
stern and stern posts are of live oak, the
deck, battery and ceiling planking are of yellow
or Georgia Pine; the deck beams are also of
yellow pine. In addition to the repairs on the
planking, the copper was scraped and such
places as needed it were re-coppered. The
following repairs were made in the department
of Steam Engineering.

(1.) The stern bearing was repaired by putting
in a new lignum vitae ring; the stuffing box
at the stern post was also repaired. To do this
it was necessary to uncouple the screw
(2) Condenser repaired; old tubes removed
(3.) Boilers scaled, re-braced, and otherwise


12

repaired
(4.) Engines were found to be out of line
which necessitated raising them 3 inches.
The shaft was also lined.

On the 28th of October the ship went out
of dry dock and was hauled along side
of the derrick. Riggers then came on board
and stripped ship to a girtline; the rigging
was sent to the loft for repairs. Previous
to going into dock the guns and crank- shaft
had been hoisted out by measure of the derrick.
The guns and carriages were cleaned and
scraped for inspection. A new crank-pin was
fitted to the shaft at the machine shop.
The ship carpenters continued their repairs
on the planking above the water line. It was
also found that some of the deck beams were
so rotten as to necessitate cutting out the rotten
portions and scarphing in new pieces. Some
of the knees of the poop deck beams were
repaired; also deck planking, plank sheer,
water ways, spirketing and top hawser were
repaired. The boats that were sent to the
boat shop received thorough repairs. A new
mizzen topmast and main topsail yard were
received. The decks were newly caulked. Such
of the old sails as were not condemned were
refited and new spare sails furnished. Four
new chains, two bowers, one sheet and one stream
were received on board in exchange for old ones.

In the Dept. of Steam Engineering, four new
steam drums were received. The old valves,
gauges, and pumps were thoroughly over-hauled
and new parts supplied where needed. The brasses
for journals, both those in use and the spare
ones, were fired out, to do which it was necessary
to set up a launch engine on the spar deck.


13

The Sectional Floating Dry Dock

Each section consists of three principal
parts (1) the tank (2) end frames (3) end floats

The tank is rectangular in shape. It is
strengthened by means of bulk headsRegularized:bulkheads and braces.
At each end is an ordinary slide valve for letting
water into the tanks, and there are three pumps
at each end for pumping out the water used
in sinking it. There is a middle line for keel
blocks on the upper side of the tank and
perpendicular to it run four "ways" for bilge
blocks. The bilge blocks are held together by clamps,
On the lower ones are two iron guides on each
side which slide along a score in the “ways”
thus keeping the blocks in place for sliding
under.

The end frames rest on two beams which
run out from the ends of the tank. Each beam
is supported by a knee beneath. The uprights
are mortised into these beams. The in board
uprights are steadied by a knee and are also
secured to the end of the tank throughout its
depth. The uprights are further steadied by
cross and diagonal braces. There are four
main uprights, with a intermediate one between
Each pair. Two of these intermediate ones
carry racks, into which gear the pistons for
raising the float. There are also two uprights
on the tank for a staging to and an inter
mediate
Regularized:intermediate
one, which is graduated in feet
up to 25 ft. These uprights all carry cross-
pieces
Regularized:crosspieces
on top, which sustain beams and
planking for the platforms. Part of this top
platform is housed over, and within
this is the machinery for the pumps
and raising apparatus. Two of the sections
on either side have engines for supplying


14

the motive power. The engines are of
the walking beam type The main shaft
of the engine carries a cog which gears into
a cog in the shafting running through the
sections. As it is necessary to allow for the
motion of any section, the shafting which runs
through all the sections is divided into parts
connected by a universal joint at each section
and a joint to allow sliding motion. On the
shaft in each house are two belt wheels which
can be thrown in or out of gear by lever.
These give motion to the pump rods. The shaft
also carries two cogs, one large and one small
gearing into corresponding cogs on a small
shaft parallel to the main shaft. One rod of
this small shaft carries a crown shaped cog
gearing into a cog (which is in a horizontal
plane), which is carried by the square
rod, running down to the end float where it has
sliding bearings.

The end floats are of wood, rectangular
box-shape, and 25 l x 12 l x 8 d. It has
guides at each of the four ends which
work in slides on the uprights. There is an
offset with two straps on the float which
holds the pinion to the rack, and also serves
as a guide on the intermediate upright which
carries the rack. In the centre of the float is
an iron frame through which runs a rod
part of which is cut to form an endless
screw. One end carries a cog worked by a
corresponding cog on the square vertical rod
mentioned above. The endless screw works on
a cog connecting with the shaft which carries
the pinion for raising or lowering the float.

The keel blocks are square blocks about
three feet in length, They are connected to
each other and to their bed by staple shaped


15

hooks, which prevent the blocks from rising
when the dock is sunk.

The bilge blocks are also square and of
about the same dimensions as the keel blocks
with the exception of the top ones, which are
rounded off to give more bearing surface. They
are held together in the same manner as the
keel blocks. These blocks run on "ways", as given
in the description of the rank. They are hauled
under the ship by means of a rope, part of
which is chain. The chain makes fast to the
in board end of the lower bilge block, reeves
through a sheave at the middle line and thence
out to the staging. A pawl, working in a
rack, which prevents the block from working
back is controlled by a line from the staging.

The wale shores are hinged to the in board
uprights of each frame in two rows of two each
they consist of two pieces one of which slides
along the other and is hauled out by a tackle.
They are graduated up to 25 feet. The breast
shores
are heavy timbers hinged to the main
tank, two at each end.

The dock complete is formed by floating as
many sections as necessary alongside of each
other. Each section will float about 500 tons.
The sections are held together by double
beams which extend from the middle of one
section to that of another. The beams butRegularized:butt
against heavy chocks bolted to the main
tank, and are connected to it by iron straps
and bolts. These beams pass thro through bits, two
at the end of each sections, and are keyed
down. The dock is anchored by means of
eight anchors, two at each corner. The
chains for which (two in number, owing to a
bridle) are shackled to rig-bolts, two a
each end of every tank.


16

Docking of the U.S.S. Adams
Mare Island, Cal.California Navy Yard
Sep.September22. 1879

In making preparations to dock the Adams
it was necessary to know the draught
of the ship, the depth of the keel, and
the dead rise. These were obtained from the
plans of the ship, and the keel & bilge
blocks laid according to this data. The
dock lines are secured to the end frames of
the fartherest section from where the ship intends
to enter and are stopped up to all the
sections and the ends passed over the bow
of the ship. A warp for hauling the ship into
the dock had one end made fast to a
spare section which was not in use and which
furnished a convenient place for belaying the
warp, on account of its being in line with the
keel blocks. The other end was ready to be passed
through the house hole of the Adams. Steam was
gotten up in the boilers and the engines tried.

Everything being in readiness the Adams
was hauled ahead to the entrance of the
dock by warps and was pointed fair for
entering by means of the dock lines taken in
over the bows and also by two quarter lines
one of which was taken to a bit on the
wharf and the other is a bury in the
stream. The dock warp was taken in
through the starboard house hole, thence
to the capstan, and the ship was hauled
ahead to within a few feet of the dock.

The gates of all the tanks were then opened
and the end floats raised at the same
time, until the dock had sunk a short
distance and the tanks were full. The gates
were then closed and the dock was sunk


17

the remainder of the distance by means of the
end floats, which were raised. The ship was
then hauled into the dock by means of the
warp, being pointed fair by the bow and
quarter lines. When fairly in the dock and
over the keel blocks the lines were belayed
and the pumps started and the dock
raised, lowering the end floats as the tanks
rose. When the keel blocks nearly touched
the keel, as ascertained by the gauges on the
uprights, the pumps were stopped. The ship
was then fairly centered over the keel blocks
by letting the graduated wales shores down on
each side. The pumps were again started
and the end floats lowered. Immediately the
keel touched the keel blocks the signal was
given for hauling the bilge blocks under, which
was done by men stationed along the dock.
The pumping was continued and the end
floats lowered until the floor of the dock
was some distance above the surface of
the water. The tanks, being relieved of the
weight of the end floats, thus bore the
ship “high and dry”, ready for repairs under
the water line.


18

The New Stone Dry Dock
Mare Island. Cal.California

The new stone dry dock now in course of
construction at the Navy yard is to be
of a size sufficient to accommodate the
largest ships. The work is necessarily slow
owing to the small appropriations, but when
finished it will compare favorably with those
another yards. The dimensions are:-
  • Length- inside caisson 400 ft.
  • Width (at top) between altars 104 "
  • Depth- 35 "
  • Width of foundation 128 "

The foundation of the dock is of
concrete, packed in layers. This concrete
is made from Portland cement, sand,
and gravel, mixed while wet, in the proper
proportions. When dry this becomes harder
than stone and very compact. Upon
this are laid the granite blocks which
form the bed and altars. They are cut
to the proper dimensions as ascertained
from the specifications and cemented
together. The blocks came from Angel Island.
The culverts on either side are made
of brick and the floor of the culvert
is lower than that of the dock, in
order to prevent any difficulty in draining.
At the end nearest the caisson the
culverts connect with the dock by
means of gates. At the other end the
two culverts connect with a single one
leading to the pump well. There are
no gates to the dock; the caisson alone
is to be used in opening and closing
the dock.


19

The Mare Island Navy Yard

The Navy Yard at the Mare Island is
of a size sufficient to construct, on
short notice, wooden war ships. At
present there are no facilities for
building iron ships. The different
buildings are arranged with reference
to the several avenues which traverse
the island. The principal street, running
from the ferry slip, extends north eastRegularized:northeast &
south west.Regularized:southwest As we go up this street from
the ferry slip we pass on the left a buil-
ding
Regularized:building
- slip, upon which is the frame of the
Mohican. Further on is the brick building
for ship-smithery. On the left hand side
is a building for Equipment and beyond
it the Office Building in which all the
heads of departments have offices. In
this building are also a court-room and
post office. The main avenue terminates at
the commandant’s quarters, which front on
an avenue perpendicular to the main avenue.
The comfortable quarters of the various officers
are on this second avenue. At the north-
west
Regularized:northwest
end are houses for watch-men and other
employees whose duties necessitate their living
on the island. At the south-west extremity
the road turns and passes the marine
barracks on the right-hand side. Further
on are the hospital and grounds.

The water front runs perpendicular to
the main avenue. A sea wall runs along
the island at this point from the ferry
slip to within a short distance of the
coal wharf. Along this wall the straits
have been dredged to a depth sufficient
for the berthing of our largest war-vessels.


20

Facing the water front are buildings of
the various departments in the following
order as we proceed from the ferry
(1.) Building occupied by Construction and
Navigation Departments. On the lower floor
in the front part is the receiving room
and in rear, the spar shop. On the upper
floor the Navigation dept. occupy the forward
end for offices and stores and the Construction
dept. occupy the rear part for the same purpose
At the extreme rear part is the paint shop
(2) Construction Building. The front part on
the lower floor is a store room for boats
mess-chests etc. In rear is the boat shop
and shop for repairing boats etc. On the upper
floor are the carpenter and pattern shops
(3.) Building of Yards & Docks. This building is
divided into various work-shops for repair
necessary upon the buildings & etc. of the yard.
(4.) Chain Cable Shed, Furnace for cleaning chains,
Anchor rack and park.
(5.) Equipment Building. On first floor, store
room for blocks tackles etc; on second floor.
sail loft. This building runs parallel to
the water front. On the S.W.Southwest side of this
building and running parallel to it is
(6) Building for Provisions & Clothing & Steam
Engineering Depts. The lower floor for stores
and the upper for offices and stores. Each
Dept. occupies half of the building. Beyond
these buildings, at the north-west end of
the island is
(7.) Building for Steam Engineering Dept. This
building runs perpendicular to the water
front. It contains machine shop. pattern
shop, boiler shop, and foundry. The machine
shop has facilities for furnishing the
largest machinery. In the foundry several

21

screw propellers have been successfully
cast. Near this building in a S.W.Southwest direction
from it, is the
(8.) Ordnance Building, used for general stores
and offices. Surrounding it are gun parks,
gun carriage shed, and shed for empty
shell.

A short distance from the machine shop
and near the end of the sea wall is the
coal wharf and large coal shed. A large
steam derrick stands near the sea wall
opposite the Equipment Building.

Proceeding from the ferry in the S.E.Southeast direction
beyond the Mochican, is the site of the new
stone dry dock now being constructed. There
are numerous wharves along the margin of
the island here. Beyond the dock a wharf
runs out to the moorings of the sectional
floating dry dock. Further on is the wharf
of the U.S.R.S. Independence Between these
two wharves is the timber basin. Near
the S.E.Southeast end of the island and about a
mile from the Independence is the Naval
Magazine for the storage for powder and
other explosives. The cemetery is also in
the vicinity. At the extreme S.E.Southeast end is
the light house.

Running parallel to the ship-smithery
building and S.E.Southeast of it, is the smithery;
Beyond this is the Gas house and an
unfinished building. Beyond this and
facing the timber basin is the Saw Mill.
The upper port of this building is the
mold loft floor. Adjoining the mill
are several timer sheds and dry kilns.


Examined
J A Howell
Comdr.Commander Comdg.Commanding


22

Rigging of the USS Adams


The rigging of the U.S.S. Adams was
done by the crew under the charge
of the Boatswain. The following is a
brief description of the standing rigging all
of which is either of wire rope or chain.

The flying jib martingale reeves single
from end of flying jib boom, through the
dolphin striker, and sits up on end to
the knight heads

The jib martingale reeves from the end of
the boom to the dolphin striker, with
shackles at either end.

The bob stays, two in number, inner and
outer, are shackled to the cut water and
set up to dead-eyes under the bowsprit.

The bowsprit shrouds shackle to eye-bolts
under the cat head and set up with
dead-eyes and laniardsRegularized:lanyards on either side of
bowsprit near the cap.

The back ropes are of hemp; they shackle
to the dolphin striker and set up with
dead eyesRegularized:deadeyes and laniardsRegularized:lanyards to the bow fords of Cathead

The whisker jumpers are fitted with an
eye over the end of the whisker boom
and set up to the cut water.

The jib and flying jib guys shackle
to their respective boom ends and set the former sets up
up the under the cat head & latter to the cathead. The former goes over
the Whisker boom end with a horse-shoe
eye, the latter running through a leader on
the whisker boom just outboard of the eye

The foot ropes look to eyes in the [...] heads
at the ends of their respective forms and
are lashed at their inner ends.

The fore stays go with lashing eyes
around foremast, just above the shrouds


23

Reeves through bowsprit bees and are set up with dead eyesRegularized:deadeyes and
laniardsRegularized:lanyards to the bees of bowsprit.

The fore topmast stays go over the
mast head nest to the pendants
with an eye reeve through a roller
in each bee of the bowsprit and set
up under the bow with dead eyesRegularized:deadeyes
and laniardsRegularized:lanyards

The jib stay goes over the mast head
nest, reeves through the end of the jib
boom Through fair leader stbd starboard side at Dolphin striker and sets up with dead eyesRegularized:deadeyes and
laniardsRegularized:lanyards

The fore to’gallant topgallant stay shackles to
the to’gallant topgallant funnel reeve through the
jib boom end Through fair leader stbd starboard side at Dolphin striker sets up with dead eyeRegularized:deadeye.

The flying jib stay shackles to the
to'gallanttopgallant funnel, reeves through
flying jib from end through fair leader port side dolphin striker and sets up with dead-
eye
Regularized:deadeye.

The fore rigging consists of six pairs
of shrouds and four pendants. Pendants
go over first, then forward starboard
pair of shrouds, then forward past pair and
so on. They set up with hemp laniardsRegularized:lanyards
and dead-eyesRegularized:deadeyes to admit of stretching.
They set up in the chains.

The topmast rigging consists of three
pairs of shrouds, going over the mast head
after the four and aft stays. They set
up with dead eyesRegularized:deadeyes and laniardsRegularized:lanyards to the
top rim.

The to’gallant topgallant mast rigging consists
of a single shroud on either side
which shackles to the funnel at the
mast head is rove through Eye of Jack and sets up in the top.

The main rigging is fitted the same
as the fore but has seven (7) pairs
of lower shrouds. The main stays set


24

up on the to'gallanttopgallant forecastle
just abaft the fore-mastRegularized:foremast. The
main topmast and and to'gallanttopgallant stays
come down to the fore-mastRegularized:foremast head. The
former set up on deck, the latter
in the top. {Main Topmast reeve through iron rollers on masthead & the t’galt topgallant stay reeve through the after part of the cap.}

The topmast back stays, two pairs,
go over the mast head last and
set up in the channels. The to’gallant topgallant
pair stays, one pair, shackle to the mast
head funnel and set up in the channels.

The mizzen rigging consists of four pairs
of shrouds, the topmast back-stay on each side
and togallant topgallant back-stay and single fore
and aft stays. The mizzen stay sets up to
the main-mast just above the pin-rail.
The topmast and the togallanttopgallant stays come
down to the main-mast head and setup
in the top.

The mizzen topmast shrouds, two pair, set
up to the cross-trees at the mizzen mast
head.

The rigging was sent down and taken to
the loft, where it was thoroughly repaired.
All the yards and spars were sent down and
refitted. The new spars received were main
tops'ltopsail yard, cross-jack yard (for torpedo practice)
fore topmast and mizzen topmast. In
rigging ship the topmasts and jib boom
were pointed and the rigging gotten over
the lower mast heads by means of gantlines
from the topmast heads. The rigging of the
jib boom end was fited Regularized: fitted and the boom rigged
out. The flying jib boom was similarly rigged
The caps, after having been sent up
in the tops, were shipped by means
of the topmasts. Then the topmasts were
rigged by means of gantlines from the


25

topmast heads and the lower caps
they were then swayed up and fidded
The lower rigging and back-stays were set
up by means of the pendant tackles
and the topmast rigging by means of
the top-burtons

Fitting out for Sea

Dec. December 1 - Received sheet chains aboard

Dec. December 2 - Dec. December 6 - Painting ship and fitting
rigging

Dec. December 6-8 . USS Marongabela hauled along side
of the coal wharf and crew transferred from
USRS. Independence to that vessel for rations and
quarters. Marine Guard received on board
from Marine Barracks DecDecember 8

Dec. December 9-31 - Crew engaged in fitting out, cleaning
and painting ship. During the month
mechanics in the different departments from
Navy Yard were engaged in repairs on ship

Dec. December 29 Dock trial of the engines, which were
found to work well.

Jan. January 1-6 Rigging ship Hoisted battery aboard and
received ordnance stores.

Jan. January 6-12 Rigging ship and receiving stores aboard

Jan. January 12 - Crew transferred to Adams -Marongabela
hauled out by Adams crew to buoy. Nangalin
stores received aboard.

Jan. January 15 - Unmoored ship and hauled alongside
coal wharf. Bent sails.

Jan. January 16-17 Crew coaled ship.

Jan. January 17 - Received aboard ordnance stores and
ammunition. Hauled ship out in stream and anchored

Jan. January 21 - Ship inspected by Board of Inspection.
Commodore Spoets, senior member. After inspection
started fires in four boilers, got underway
and dropped down to buoy opposite
ferry slip, Mare Island.


26

Jan. January 21-31 Crew engaged in work
aboard. Awaiting sailing orders. Crew
exercised by divisions each day.

Feb. February 2 - Received sealed sailing orders

Feb. February 3 - Got up anchor at 2 P.M.
and steamed to San Francisco. and
dropped anchor off Jackson St. Wharf

Feb. February 4 - Took pilot on board and got
up anchor at 10 30 A.M. Passed thro through
the Golden Gate. Pilot boat took off
pilot. Order opened and destination found
to be Mazatlan, Mexico and ship brought
to her course.

ExdExamined J. A. Howell
Comdr. Commander


27

Journal

Passage from San Francisco, Cal California to Pichilingue Bay L.C.Lower California

Feb. February 4 1880. :- At 11-55 discharged pilot. Set course
S.W.Southwest x WWest ½ WWest. At 12-15, Whistling Buoy fore (p.c) N.North x EEast, distant
½ mile. Point Bonito Light N.North 30 o EEast. Took departure from
Whistling Buoy and put overboard patent log. Ship under
steam and fore and aft sail. Weather clear, cool
and pleasant. Changed course to S.E.Southeast at 4-15 P.M. Barometer
falling from 30.48 to 30.36

Feb. February 5 : Distance now by log since preceding noon. 202.6 knots.
Lat.Latitude by Obs.Observation at noon ⊙ [2] 34 o 33 o N.North. Long.Longitude now 121 o 30 o WWest
Var.Variation of Compass 12 o 50 o EEast. Ship under steam alone
during most of the day. Calm and light airs from
Sd and Ed. At 9.20 ran into fog bank from the Edn
which cleared away by noon. At 1.20 P.M. Point Aquello
bore (pc) N.E.Northeast ¼ EEast distant about 35 miles At 3 P.M. sighted
a steamer's smoke astern. Smooth-sea during the-day
Barometer steady at 30.47

Feb. February 6 . Distance run by log since preceding noon. 165 knots.
Lat.Latitude by Obs. Observation at noon N.North 31 o 54’04” Long.Longitude noon. WWest 119 o 52’.
Variation of Compass 10 o 45’ EEast. Course S.E.Southeast till 1 P.M.
when changed 6’ S.E.SoutheastX EEast ½ E.East Ship under steam
alone during the entire day. Calms and light
airs from N.E.Northeast and S.E.Southeast Weather clear, cool, & pleasant
Smooth sea. Sunny A.M. Barometer rising 30.42 to
30.47 during P.M. falling to 30.36.

Feb. February 7 :- Distance run by patent log since preceding noon
210 knots Lat. Latitude by Obs. Observation. at noon 29 o 22’38”N.North
Long.Longitude 116 o 53WWest. Var.Variation of Compass. 8 o 45’ EEast. Course
S.E.Southeast x EEast ½ EEast. until 8 :05 P.M. when changed to S.E.Southeast
Ship under steam alone during most of day.
Fore and aft sail set when practicable. Light airs
and light and gentle breezes from N.NorthN.E.Northeast and N.NorthN.W.Northwest
Weather clear warm and pleasant. Smooth sea.
At 5-30 AM sighted Guadalupe Island.
bearing (pc.) S.W.Southwest 1/4WWest. At noon Guadalupe Island
bore (pc) N.NorthS.W.Southwest 1/2WWest. distant about 70 miles. At 4PM


28

highest peak of Cerros Island bore (p.c)
ESEEast Southeast 1/2 E.East Barometer falling from 30.34 to 30.26.

Feb. February 8. Distance run by patent log since
preceding noon 229.2 knots Lat.Latitude by Obs. Observationat
noon. 26 o 10’23” N.North; Long.Longitude 114 o 13’15”W.West Var.Variation of
Compass. 8 o 15’ EEast. Courses:- 12-30 AM to 4-20 PM.
S.E.SoutheastxEEast 1/4E.East 4-20 P.M. to 8.15 PM. S.E.Southeast x EEast. 8-15P.M.
S.E.Southeast 1/2 E.East Ship under steam and fore topsail &
foresail during first four hours; remainder of
the day under steam alone. Calms during
greater part of the day, with occasional light
airs and breezes from N.NorthN.W.Northwest. SSouth.S.W.Southwest and Ed. Partly
cloudy but pleasant weather. Smooth sea . At
7 A.M. the following bearings were taken (p.c.):-
Table Head N.NorthN.E.Northeast 3/4 Morro Hermoso Peak,
NNorth 1/4 E.East Highest point of Sierra Pintada. NNorth x WWest ¼ WWest.
FebBarometer A.M 30.20 to 30.29 P.M. 30.22 to 30.25

Feb. February 9. - Distance run by patent log since
preceding noon, 219.2 knots. Lat.Latitude by Obs. Observation. at
noon. 23 o 30’20”N.North Long.Longitude 111 o 14’45”WWest. Variation
6 o 30’ EEast. Courses steered:- S.E.Southeast 1/2 EEast until 5.10 AM.
5-10AM to 4 PM ESEEast Southeast 1/2 E;East thence in succession
EEast 1/2 SSouth until 5; EEast x SSouth until 7-30. S.E.Southeast x EEast 3/4 EEast until 8 P.M.
S.E.Southeast x EEast 1/4EEast until 9 PM. EEastN.E.Northeast 3/4 EEast till -11. and N.E.Northeast 1/4EEast
during remainder of day. Ship under steam
alone; fore and aft sail set when practicable
Light and moderate breezes from Nd and Ed. Partly
cloudy and pleasant weather. At 6 A.M the
following bearings were taken: (p.c)
Cape St. Lazaro N.North 1/4 WWest; Entrance to Magdalena
Bay N.NorthN.E.Northeast; Cape Tosco, N.E.Northeast 1/2 EEast. Cape Corso
N.NorthN.W.Northwest Barometer average height 30.24

Feb. February 10. Distance run by log from preceding
noon_ 222 knots Lat.Latitude at noon by X
bearings of land. 24 o 11’ N.NorthLong.Longitude 109 o 58;.
Shaping course around Cape St Lucas


29

and standing in through San Lorenzo Channel
to Pichilingue Bay. Ship under steam alone.
Fresh N.W.Northwest breezes. Smooth sea. At 6.50 A.M.
Ceralbo Island bore (p.c) N.W.Northwest x WWest, Pt.Point Arenas
SSouth x W.North Passed inside of Ceralbo Island and
into Pichilingue Bay, coming to anchor
at 3.50. P.M.

Pichilingue Bay and LaPaz

Pichilingue Bay is the principal coaling
station for American vessels running between
the United States and Mexican and
Southern American ports along the Pacific
Coast. The bay indents the eastern coast
of the peninsula of Lower California at
the southern extremity. The large pile of
anthracite coal is protected from weather
by a large shed, and is under the
charge of a store keeper. H.M.S.Her/His Majesty's Ship Penguin
was at Pichilingue refitting while the
Adams was coaling, and had been there
for about six weeks.

LaPaz, about five miles from the Bay,
is the principal sea port of Lower
California. During the ninth of January
it was the scene of a revolution, but
a short time before the arrival of the Adams
the revolutionists had the been driven out of
the town and business was resumed
by the merchants. The carrying trade between
LaPaz and the U.S. United States is chiefly done by
the steamer Newbern running between San
Francisco and Mazatlan.


30

Passage from Pichilingue to Mazatlan
Feb. February 13-15, 1880

At 5-50 P.M. February 13 got under way
and stood out of Pichilingue Bay
Light wind from N.N.W.North Northwest and barometer
steady at 30.20. Towards midnight
wind freshened and was blowing a stiff
breeze and sea very rough. Barometer steady
30.23. Ship rolling heavily and shipping
seas. Set fore topmast stay sail, fore and
main trysails, and fore sail. From 4 to 8 A.M
Barometer fell to 30.17. Weather squally. Set
single reefed main topsail. During the
forerunner watch the sea moderated and
breeze decreased in strength, barometer
remaining steady at 30.20. Weather
became pleasant and breeze gentle.
At noon, February 14 , the distance run
as shown by patent log was 118 knots. 8
fast ones. Lat.Latitude by obs. observation. at noon 24 o 09’29” N.North
Long.Longitude 108 o 42’ 00 W.West Variation of Compass EEast 5 o 59’
During the day barometer fell to 30.11
and was steady at that during the
afternoon. Came to anchor in the
harbor of Mazatlan at 10AM. Feb.February 15.
S.E.Southeast point of Creston Island bearing (pc) SSouth.WWest; North east.

Causalities in Engine Room
During the passage to Pichilingue the
gland for the packing of the feed pump piston
was blown out and bent so as to be unfit for use.
The gland was taken from the bilge pump and
fitted on the feed pump, and the bilge pumped
out by means of an auxiliary pump. When bound
for Mazatlan the feed pipe of Boiler No.Number 8 burst
and was wrapped with canvas until reaching port
where it was repaired


31

Passage from
Mazatlan Mexico. to Gulf of Dulce. Costa Rica
Feb. February 17- Feb. February 28, 1880

Feb. February 17 : Got up anchor at 8.15 AM. Took departure
from Creston Island, bearing (pc.) N.W.Northwest x WWest 1/4WWest.
put over patent log. Distance run at noon
since taking departure, 21.6 knots. Lat. Latitude by
Obs.Observation at noon 22. o 45’10” NNorth; Long.Longitude 106 o 20’WWest. Var.Variation of
Compass 6 o 13’ EEast Courses: S.S.E.South Southeastuntil 1 p.M.; SE SoutheastX SSouth
until 6 P.M; and SSouthX EEast. Ship under all plain
sail and steam. Light airs and breezes from
WNWWest Northwest,, N.W.Northwest and ENE.East Northeast Clear and pleasant
weather. Smooth sea. Barometer rising from 30.20
to 30.29 during A.M, and failing to 30.24. P.M.

Feb. February 18 - Distance run by log since preceding noon
170.6 knots. Lat.Latitude by obs. observation. at noon 20 o 05'07 N.North
Long.Longitude 105 o 36’WWest. Variation of Compass 5 o 15’EEast.
Courses:- SSouth X EEast, till 4 AM; South until 6AM;
S.E.Southeast until 7; S.E.Southeast X EEast until 10AM; S.E.Southeast until 7PM.
S.E.SoutheastXSSouth until midnight. Ship under sail and steam.
Calms and light airs from N.W.Northwest to NENortheast during
AM. ; moderate breezes from NWNorthwest X WWest during P.M.
Weather clear warm and pleasant. Smooth
sea during AM; moderate during P.M. Barometer
falling from 30.22 to 30.06, then rising and steady
at 30.12. Uncoupled propeller at 10-35 A.M.
At 6 AM Cape Coriente bore (p.c) S.E.Southeast X EEast 1/2 E.East at
4PM. Black Rock bore (p.c.) NENortheast distant two
miles.

Feb. February 19 _ Distance run by patent log since
preceding noon, 134.4 knots. Lat.Latitude by obs. observation
18 o 27’ 42”N.North; Long.Longitude 104 o 03’15” W.West Variation of
Compass: 3 o Courses: 1 Am to 6 AM; ESEEast Southeast
until 9P.M. ESEEast Southeast 1/4EEast; until midnight ESEEast Southeast 1/4EEast
Ship under sail and steam. Light breezes from


32

WNWWest Northwest and SSWSouth Southwest, with calm and variable airs
Sd and Ed. Weather clear warm and
pleasant. Smooth sea. Barometer rising from
30.11 to 30.23 during A.M; falling to 30.14 during
P.M. and then rising again and becoming
steady at 30.20. At 4P.M. Black head bore (p.c)
NNWNorth Northwest 1/4 WWest.

February 20th.
Distance run by log from preceding noon
150.8 knots. Lat.Latitude by Obs. Observation. at noon. 17o 18’57” N.North
Long.Longitude 101 o 40’WWest. Variation EEast2 o 09’ Courses:-
EEastS.E. Southeast1/4EEast until 7AM; EEast X SSouth until 4 P.M;
EEastS.E.Southeast3/4EEast for the remainder of the day. Light
airs and breezes from Nd and Ed during AM.
Gentle and moderate breezes from WNWWest Northwest
and NW Northwestduring P.M. Weather clear warm
and pleasant. Smooth sea. Ship under
sail and steam. Barometer rising from
30.18 to 30.25, remaining steady at 30.25
during latter part of A.M. and falling to
30.15 during P.M. At noon Islas Blancas
bore NNENorth Northeast 1/4 E.East

February 21 - Distance run by patent log
since preceding noon 145.3 knots. Lat.Latitude
at noon by Obs. Observation. 16 o 07’ 21” N.North Long.Longitude 99o 25’30” WWest.
Variation 2 o 15’ EEast. Courses: ESEEast Southeast 3/4EEast until
2PM; EEast 1/2 SSouth for remainder of the day. Light
and gentle breezes from S.W.Southwest and West,
during A.M.; Calms and light airs from
WWest. WSWWest Southwest and SSouth X WWest during PM Weather clear
warm and pleasant. Smooth sea. Ship
under sail and steam. Barometer rising
from 30.11 to 30.20 during AM; falling to
30.08 and rising again to 30.18 during P.M


33

Feb. February 22 - Distance run by log from preceding
noon, 158.4 knots. Lat.Latitude by Obs. Observation. at noon.
15”27’03N.North Long.Longitude 96’47 WWest. Variation of Compass
2 o E.East Courses steered EEast 1/2 SSouth until 6 AM;
EEast 3/4 N.North during remainder of day. Light airs from
Nd, Ed, and Sd, Light and gentle breezes from
NNW,North NorthwestSSE,South Southeast SE,Southeast NNENorth Northeast and North. Weather clear
warm and pleasant: Long ground swell.
Barometer ranging from 30.11 to 30.19 during AM
falling from 30.13 to 30.07 and then rising to 30.17
during PM

Feb. February 23 - Distance run by patent log from preceding
noon, 165 knots; Lat.Latitude by Obs. Observation. at noon 14 o 49’21 N.North
LongLongitude. 93 o 43’ WWest. Variation 2 o 25’ EEast. Courses steered:-
EEast 3/4 N.North until 7AM; ESEEast Southeast 1/4 EEast until 11 P.M; then
ESE.East Southeast Gentle and moderate breezes from N.North X EEast,
and NNW North Northwestduring AM; Light airs and breeze from
S.W.SouthwestS.E.Southeast and E.East during PM. Weather clear and
pleasant during greater part of day, occasionally
cloudy. Long ground swell during AM; smooth
sea during PM Barometer rises from
30.12 to 30.16 during AM; then falling to 30.06
during PM and then rising to and remaining
steady at 30.14 Ship under steam and sail.

Feb. February 24 . Distance run by patent log from
preceding noon 162 knots; Lat.Latitude by Obs. Observation.
at noon 13 o 28’08” N.North. LongLongitude 91 o 21’ WWest. Variation
& Deviation 11 o EEast. Course steered:- E.S.E.East Southeast.
Calms, and light airs and breezes from Nd and
Ed. during AM; gentle E.S.E.East Southeast breeze during
first part of P.M, with calm and light NNENorth Northeast
airs during latter part. Weather clear, warm
and pleasant. Long swell. Barometer
steady at 30.10 during first part of A.M, rising
to 30.16 during latter part fell to 30.05 during
first part of PM and then rose gradually to 30.12


34

A 5-10 AM Mt. Agua bore (p.c) N.E. Northeast1/2EEast.

Feb. February 25 :- Distance run by log since pre-
ceding
Regularized:preceding
noon, 122 knots. Lat.Latitude in by Obs. Observation. . at
noon 12 o 28’45”NNorth; Long.Longitude 89 o 17’ W.West Variation
2 o 15E.East Courses steered: E.S.E. Eastsoutheastuntil 2P.M, then
changed S.E.Southeast x E East1/2EEast. Light air and breeze
flying all around the compass until 9P.M.
when a fresh breeze sprang up from Ed
Weather clear and pleasant Long swell
during AM; smooth to moderate sea during
PM Ship under sail and steam.
Barometer ranging from 30.06 to 30.10 during
AM; falling to 30.03 and then rising to 30.08
during P.M.

Feb. February 26 - Distance run by patent log from
preceding noon 143 knots; Lat.Latitude by Obs. Observation.
at noon 10 o 28’ N;NorthLongLongitude. 87 o 06’45” W.West Var. Variation
EEast. 1 o 30’. Courses steered:- S.E.Southeast x EEast to 3am;
S.E.SoutheastxEEast. 1/2E.East to 11A.M. S.E.Southeast X EEast to 2PM; S.E.SoutheastxEEast1/2 EEast
to 6PM; and E.S.EEastsoutheast. during remaining of day
Fresh and moderate breezes veering from
E EastxN.North to N.NorthN.ENortheast. but dying out during PM.
Weather clear and pleasant. Sea rough
during morning watch, smooth-during PM.
Ship under sail and steam. Barometer
rising from 30.04 to 30.10 during AM and
falling to 29.98 during PM.

Feb. February 27 _ Distance run by patent log from
preceding noon, 156 knots. Lat.Latitude at noon
by Obs Observation. . 8 o 57’15” N.North LongLongitude 85 o 12’15”. Variation
Courses steered:- EEastS.E.Southeast. till 9 AM; E EastX SSouth
till 9 PM, then EEastS.E. Southeast1/2EEast Light breezes from
Nd and Ed during AM; and from Sd
and Ed during PM. Partially cloudy weather-
but warm and pleasant. Smooth sea.


35

Barometer rising from 29.96 to 30.05 during AM.
and falling to 29.97 and then rising to 30.02 during
PM. Sighted island bearing N.E.NortheastxEEast1/2EEast at 10PM

Feb. February 28 :- Entering the Gulf of Dulce. At 12.25
AM Cano Island bore N.E. Northeastx EEast1/2EEast. At end of
watch Sal-si-Puedes point and Cano to the Sd.
in sight. At 8AM Sombrero Point was on the
post beam and Pt.Point Tigrita bore (pc) N.W. NorthwestX NNorth. At
9-16" came to with starboard anchor and 30
fathoms of chain in 12 fathoms of water. Entrance
of Golfo bearing N.E.Northeast1/2N.North and Point ____ SSouth3/4EEast.


36

Description of Magazine, Shell Room and Torpedo Locker

The ammunition and powder for the
battery of the USS Adams are stowed in
the shell room and magazine, which are
both entered from the berth deck through
hatches in the after part of the deck. . The
torpedo room is entered in a similar
manner.

The magazine hatch is on the port side
and opens into the magazine passage
which runs fore and aft. The magazine
is on the starboard side of the passage
and runs athwartships. On the port side
of the passage is the Howitzer ammunition room
and at the forward end the percussion room
for fuzes etc. The magazine door has a
small passing hole cut in it, which is closed
by a small hinged door. There is but one
magazine alley at the starboard end of
which is the light box which is entered
by a scuttle in the berthdeck. The powder
is stored in tanks, stored on shelves four
tiers deep. The flood cock of the magazine
is in the Howitzer ammunition room, and
the hose connected to it for testing purposes
is, when not in use, coiled down in the
magazine passage. The over flow and
waste pipes are in the magazine proper

When passing powder the berth-deck magazine
hatch is screened off from the berth deck
by means of the magazine screen. The
powder is passed from the magazine through
the small aperture in the magazine down
to the magazine passage, where the
cartridges are put in passing boxes.
Thence it is passed up, through a round
scuttle in the magazine hatch cover, to


37

within the screen; thence through a flap in
the screen to the runner on the berth
deck who takes it to the fore hatch, one of
the gratings of the which, on the port side, is left
off for the purpose of passing it up to the
spar deck to the powder room. The empty
boxes are returned to the berth deck through
a chute, at the bottom of which is a
tub grated and partially filled with
water. This is for the reception of any loose
grains of powder which may be left in
the passing box; thence passed to screen, but not inside.

The shell room is entered by a hatch
from the berth deck similar to that
for the magazine. The XI inch shell
and shrapnel are stowed on the port
side and the IX ininch. on the port starboard . The 60 pdrpounder
ammunition fills in the amidship space
and such spaces near the bulkheads
as are left after the storage of the
other shell. Shell and shrapnel boxes are
whipped up to the berth deck, then taken
by runners to the shell whip at the fore
hatch, starboard side, and whipped up
to the spar deck. Grape and canister
for the smooth bore guns are stored
in racks along the sides of the berth
deck; that for the rifle gun under
the to’ gallant topgallant forecastle. Solid shot is
kept in racks on the spar deck, around
the hatches; also in the shot lockers,
starboard and port, which are entered
by hatches from the after store-rooms.

The torpedoes and gear are stored in
the torpedo-room with the exception of two
spar torpedoes which are kept in racks
underneath the ladders at each gangway.
(over)


38


[Figure] Plan of Magazine
[Description of figure: hand drawn image of ship interior-magazine-1/4 page]


39

Establishment of the U.S. Coaling Station
By the U.S. Steamer Adams
Golfito. Gulf of Dulce. Costa Rica. March 1880.

Upon the arrival of the Adams in the Gulf
of Dulce, FebFebruary . 28, 1880 , a cruise was made
along the shore of the gulf for the purpose
of selecting a suitable position for a coaling
depot. A running survey was made of the
Eastern shore. Ran into Golfito harbor Mar. March
2nd. Mar.March
2nd.., and came to anchor at 1.15 P.M. The
Gulf of Dulce not having offered a suitable
place for the proposed station, it was
determined to explore the harbor of Golfito
as possibly offering a suitable site and the
necessary depth of water. Accordingly a
board of officers was appointed by the
commanding officer, who were ordered to
sound the harbor and select, if possible,
a favorable place for the station. After
several days of exploring and sounding
the board reported favorably on a site
on the shore opposite the entrance to the
harbor. Working parties were sent ashore
and commenced clearing away the
space by felling trees and cutting away
underbrush. The dimensions of the clearing
are 87 yds yards x 62 yds yards . Fifty bags of coal were
sent ashore and a temporary shed
placed over it. Such dry wood could
be utilized were used as fire wood for
the galley. All the refuse brush was
burned and the place thoroughly
cleared.

The harbor was surveyed by the
navigator and assistants. The base line
was selected on the northern shore, about
five-hundred yards to the westward of the station.


40

  • Length of Base Line 1000 feet
  • Astronomical Bearing NNorth. 69 o 45 o

The base line was measured with a
brass wire, 100 feet in length, which had
been verified by comparison with a steel
tape aboard ship. Stations were established
at all principal points, fourteen twenty in number,
marked by white flags with staffs made
of saplings, about fifteen-feet long, and white-washed.

A tide gauge was set up on the beach
near the clearing, in two feet of water
at low tide. It consisted of a plank
painted white and graduated from 0 to
13 feet, marked in tenths. This was
nailed to a stake, previously driven in
the ground and supported by rocks piled
about it. The zero of the gauge was about
two feet below water at low tide. During
the unusually low tides of the month, it
was found necessary to set up an
auxiliary gauge, similarly graduated to
the principal one, two feet and a half
long, the zero mark on a level with
the one foot of the other gauge.

All the angles were measured by
means of a night octant, on account
of the power of its telescope. Soundings
were run by ranges from station to
station, and any sounding of importance
was accurately determined by angling
on one of the stations. With the
necessary data (the soundings having
been reduced to the plane of mean
low water) the chart was plotted
and soundings run in. The scale
of the Chart made by the navigator
is 1/ 10000.

The altitude and bearings of all


41

prominent heights were obtained as follows:-
The altitude of the height was measured,
using shore horizon, the observer being posted
as some distant station. Correct the attitude for
dip. Knowing the distance of the shore horizon
1 from the station of the observer, it being taken from
the chart, we have an angle and the adjacent
side of the right angled triangle, we can
compute the perpendicular height of the object.
Next measure the angular distance of the
point on the shore horizon to which the image of
the peak was brought down, from a distant station.
This determines the point for plotting the
height. This method is necessarily not very
accurate.
A shoal off the point at the
left hand of the entrance to the harbor
was marked by a buoy. On Mar. March 25 , an exped-
ition
Regularized:expedition
was sent up the Coto River to reconnoitre.

Record of the Month. Mar. March 1880

During the month the standing rigging
was over hauled, set-up, and rattled down.
Having anchored by the starboard anchor,
during the month it was hove up and
the port anchor let go, in order to see if
everything was clear. It was subsequently dropped
again and the port anchor hove in. The
crew were exercised at quarters, and target
practice with great guns and small arms was
held. Exercised with spans and sails, setting sails,
shortening sail, loosing, furling, reefing, bending and
unbending and sending down to’gallant Regularized:topgallantyards.
The naval brigade was landed during the month
and the boats drilled in tactics incidental
to “arms and away.”



42


[Figure] Determination of Heights
[Description of figure: Hand drawn image showing geometry involved in determing distant heights. Hand drawn image of height determination was glued onto page, obscuring some words. ]

The observer stands at a distant sta[Illegible: tion].
Measure the angular distance of the
peak P above the shore horizon. This
angle, corrected for dip, gives the angle
x. Measure also the angular dis[Illegible: tance]
in a horizontal plane between a second
station C and the point in the
shore horizon to which the image
of the peak was brought down. This
gives the angle B. The observer then
takes his position at C, and bring[Illegible: s]
the image of the peak down to the
shore horizon. He then measures the
angular distance between B and the
point to which the image of the p[Illegible: eak]
was brought down. This gives the ang[Illegible: le ]
y. The distance BC is known, and
having the two adjacent angle sides in
the triangle BAC, we can compute
the side AB = y. Then in the triangle
(right angled) PAB, we have the ang[Illegible: le]
(alpha)and the side AB, to find PA. [...]
required height

Approved
J A Howell




[Figure] Harbor of Golfito,
[Description of figure: hand drawn map glued into logbook]

Gulf of Dulce, Costa Rica
Mean rise and fall, 9.3 feet
Cor. establishment of Part II(h)XIV(m)
Surveyed in 1880 by U.S.S Adams Sounding in fathom
Scale 1/ 30000
The spaces within the dotted lines bare at low water



43


44

[Logs of the U.S.S. Adams, Gulf of Dulce to Callao, Peru - May 5, 1880-July 5, 1880]

Log of U.S.S Adams, (3d rate). Passage from
Gulf of Dulce To Punta Arenas. May 5, 1880.

Hour
A.M.
Knots Fathoms Courses
Steered
WINDS
Direction
WINDS
Force
Barometer
HEIGHT
in Inches
Barometer
Then
attd
TEMPERATURES
Air
D.DryBulb
TEMPERATURES
Air
W.Wet Blb Bulb
TEMPERATURES
Water
at
Surface
State of
the Weather
by symbols
Forms
of
Clouds
Prop. Proportion
of
Blue Sky
in 10ths
State
of
Sea
Record of sail
ship was under
at end of watch
1 At anchor
Heading
E.N.E.East North East
N.N.W.North North West 1-2 30.08 80 79 77 b.c cir cirrus
&
cum cumulus
8 Smooth
2 EEast x N.North " 1-2 30.08 80 79 76 " " 8 "
3 " " 1-2 30.08 80 78 76 " " 8 "
4 EEast " 1-2 30.08 80 78 76 " " 8 "
5 E.N.E.East North East N.North 2 30.08 80 78 76 " " 8 "
6 N.W.Northwest " 2 30.09 79 78 76 " " 9 "
7 N.North " 1 30.10 79 78 76 " " 9 "
8 underway S.W.Southwest x WWest Calm 0 30.13 81 79 77 " cir cirrus
cir.cum cirro-cumulus
8 "
9 5 2 SSouth 3/4 WWest WWest 1 30.15 82 80 78 " " 8 "
10 5 4 " S.E.Southeast 1 30.15 83 81 79 " cum.
cumulus
circum
cirro-cumulus
7 "
11 2
1
1
4
6
6
SSouth 1/4 WWest
SSouthxWWest
S.W.Southwest
S.S.W.South Southwest 1 30.13 84 82 79 " cir.
cirrus
, cir-
strat
cirro-stratus

circum cirro-cumulus
8 "
12 2
1
1
6
2
4
"
W.S.W.West Southwest
WWest.
WWest 2 30.12 85 83 79 " " 8 "

Dist.Distance run by Log from preceding noon.
Lat.Latitude at noon, (by Bearings of Land) 8 o 14’ N.North
Long.Longitude . “ “ “ “ 83 o 20’ 30” WWest
Lat.Latitude at noon by Observation ⊙ Water expended during preceding 24 hrs.
“ on hand, fit for use at noon.

Hour
P.M.
Knots Fathoms Courses
Steered
WINDS
Direction
WINDS
Force
Barometer
HEIGHT
in Inches
Barometer
Then
attd
TEMPERATURES
Air
D.DryBulb
TEMPERATURES
Air
W.Wet Blb Bulb
TEMPERATURES
Water
at
Surface
State of
the Weather
by symbols
Forms
of
Clouds
Prop. Proportion
of
Blue Sky
in 10ths
State
of
Sea
Record of sail
ship was under
at end of watch
1 5 0 WWest. W.S.W.West Southwest 2 30.09 85 83 79 b.c. ← cum.cumulus
cir.cirrus
S Smooth
2 3 8 " " 2 30.07 86 84 80 " cum.cumulus
cir.cirrus
8 "
3 4 6 " " 2 30.05 86 84 80 " " 8 "
4 4 6 N.W.NorthwestxWWest1/2WWest " 2 30.04 85 83 79 " " 8 "
5 4 6 " WWestxSSouth 2 30.04 85 84 79 " cir cum.cirro-cumulus
cum cumulus cir cirrus
8 "
6 5 0 " " 1-2 30.05 85 83 79 " " 6 "
7 2
2
5
6
W.N.W.West Northwest " 2 30.06 85 83 79 b.c.Z cum.cumulus
cir.cirrus
7 "
8 5 2 " WWestxN.North 2 30.08 84 83 78 " " 8 "
9 5 0 " " 1-2 30.11 85 83 78 " cum.cumulus
str.stratus
8 "
10 4 6 " " 1-2 30.11 85 83 78 " " 8 "
11 2
2
4
4
"
N.W.Northwest
N.W.Northwest x WWest- 1-2 30.11 85 83 79 " " 6 "
12 5 0 " N.W.Northwest 1-2 30.09 85 83 79 " " 4 "

45

From 4 to 8 A.M. : Clear and pleasant; light breeze from Nd.Northward falling
calm toward end of watch. Bar. Barometer rising. Sea smooth. Cir cumcirro-cumulus clouds.
Ship’s draft forward: 12’7” aft 15.8”. Hoisted all boats and secured them for sea.
At 7-30 got underway and steamed out of Golfito. At end of watch, steaming
out of Gulf of Dulce. Secured anchors for sea.

8 A.M. to Merid.Meridian (noon) Light airs and breeze from WWest, S.E.Southeast, S.S.W.South Southwest and WWest. Weather
clear and pleasant. Bar. Barometer falling. At 9.00 set fore & aft sails
except fore & main trysails and main topmast staysails. Steaming
out of Gulf of Dulce. Rounding Matapalo Pt.Point at 11:15. At 12. At 12 Mata-
pazo
Regularized: Matapalo
Rock bore (p.c.) WWest ½ N.North, 2 miles distant.

Merid.Meridian (noon) to 4 PM :- Weather clear & pleasant, with light breeze from
WSWWest Southwest. At 12-30 took in fore & aft sails. At 1-10 slowed and stopped
and got a cast of the deep-sea lead. in 160 fathoms, no bottom
Bearings at time, Cape Matapalo. EEast 1/4N.North & Chancha Pelona Rock. N.W.Northwest X WWest 1/2WWest. At
1-30 went ahead again. At 3.00 changed course to N.W.Northwest x WWest1/2WWest & set jib fflying. jib.
main topmast stay sail & spanker. Sighted a schooner to the S.W.Southwest standing
to the Nd.Northward

4 to 6 PM:
Light breeze and airs from WWest X SSouth. Clear & pleasant weather. cir,cirrus cum.,cumulus
&cirro-cumcirro-cumulus clouds. At 5.45 the schooner having hoisted her colors we run up
ours. Land in sight on starb. starboard bow, beam. & quarters. At 5.45 mustered at
quarters and exercised at company drill.

6 to 8 P.M : Weather clear, warm, & pleasant. Hazy around horizon. Light breeze
WWest XSSouth to W WestXN.North. At 6:40 got a cast of lead in 36 fathfathoms. of water-soft black mud.
Corcorado Rock bearing (p.c.) N.NorthXEEast3/4EEast; Llorena Pt (p.c) N.N.W.North Northwest Lost sight of land about
7-30 changed course to N.N.W.North Northwest at 6-30. Ship on course N.N.W.North Northwest at end of watch.

8 P.M. to Midnight:-
Clear & pleasant; a little hazy about horizon. Light
breeze from WWest; hauling to Nd.Northward Bar. Barometer steady. At 10-30 changed
course to N.W.Northwest & Cano Island bore N.E.Northeast x NNorth. At 12
Cano Island bore (p.c) about EEast.


46

Log of U.S.S Adams, (3d rate). Passage from
Gulf of Dulce To Punta Arenas.
May 6, 1880.

Hour
A.M.
Knots Fath. Fathoms Courses
Steered
WINDS
Direction
WINDS
Force
Lee
way
Barometer
HEIGHT
in
Inches
Barometer
Ther.
attd
TEMPERATURES
Air
D.Dry B. Bulb
TEMPERATURES
Air
W.Wet B. Bulb
TEMPERATURES
Water
of
Sur. Surface
State of
Weather
Forms
of
Clouds
Percent
of
Blue
Sky
State
of
Sea
Record of sail
1 4 8 N.W. Northwest W WestxN.North 2 30.06 84 83 79 85 b.c.z.Z cum.cumulus
&
circirrus
6 G
2 4 8 " W WestxSSouth 2 30.04 84 83 78 85 " cum.cumulus
circirrus
nimnimbus
4 "
3 4 8 " " 2 30.04 84 83 78 85 " " 2 "
4 4 8 " WWest 2 30.04 84 83 78 85 " cir-cum.cirro-cumulus
cumcumulus
& nimnimbus
6 "
5 4 8 " WWestxN.North 2 30.05 84 83 77 85 " " 7 "
6 5 6 " " 2 30.08 83 82 78 85 b.c. " 3 S. Smooth
7 5 8 " N.W.NorthwestxN.North 2 30.10 83 83 79 85 " " 1 "
8 6 0 " N.N.W.North Northwest 2 30.11 84 83 79 85 " " 5 "
9 3
3
6
2
2
0
" E.N.E.East Northeast 2 30.14 84 83 79 86 " circirrus
cumcumulus
5 "
10 4
2
3
3
4
2
2
N.W.Northwest1/2N.North
N.W.NorthwestxN.North
N.North WWest 21 30.14 86 84 79 87 " circirrus
cumcumulus
6 " set all f fore & aft sail
11 4
2
4
2
"
N.N.W.North Northwest
N.N.W.North Northwest 1 30.15 86 84 79 87 " " 5 " Took in & furled
all sail.
12 6 6 " " 2 30.13 86 84 79 87 " " 6 "

Distance run by Log from preceding noon.
Lat.Latitude at noon, by bearings of land 9 o 34’30” N.North
Long.Longitude . “ “ “ “ 84 o 38’ 00” WWest
Lat.Latitude by Obs.Observation.

Hour
P.M.
Knots Fath. Fathoms Courses
Steered
WINDS
Direction
WINDS
Force
Lee
way
Barometer
HEIGHT
in
Inches
Barometer
Ther.
attd
TEMPERATURES
Air
D.Dry B. Bulb
TEMPERATURES
Air
W.Wet B. Bulb
TEMPERATURES
Water
of
Sur. Surface
State of
Weather
Forms
of
Clouds
Percent
of
Blue
Sky
State
of
Sea
Record of sail
1 6 3 N.N.W.North Northwest S.S.W.South Southwest 1-2 30.10 86 85 80 87 b.c.z circirrus
cum.cumulus
str.stratus
6 Set head sails, fore sail
main topmast stays
toparcher
2 6 2 " " 2-3 30.06 86 85 79 86 " " 6 shortened & furled
all sail
3 making
anchor-
age
Regularized:anchorage
" 3 30.03 85 85 79 85 " " 5
4 " 3-4 30.01 85 85 80 86 b.c circirrus
cumcumulus
5

Came to anchor at 3.30


47

Commences & until 4 A.M:-
Light breeze from WWest XN.North first hour of watch, from WWest XSSouth. 2d & 3d hours,
and from WWest. last hour of watch. Cloudy sky. Cirrus, cumulus, & nimbus clouds
Weather warm and pleasant. Hazy horizon. Bar.Barometer steady. Set
fore & aft. sails at 1-30 and took in all sails at 3.30.

From 4 to 8 A.M:-
Weather pleasant with light breeze from WWest XNNorth to N.N.W.North Northwest A
long swell setting in from Sd.Southward At daylight sighted land
on starboard beam and quarter. At 8 Pt Judas bore (p.c.)
W.N.W.West Northwest 1/4W.West, & Quepas Pt.Point N.E.NortheastXNNorth

8A.M. to Merid.Meridian (noon):-
First hour light breeze from E.N.E.Eastnortheast, then light airs from N.W.Northwest
&N.N.W.North Northwest. Light breeze from S.S.W.South Southwest last hour. Clear & hot. Cirrus
cumulus and stratus clouds. At 9-30, mustered at
quarters. At 8:15 set fore & aft sail & at 9-30 took them in.
At end of watch Blanca Island bore (p.c.) WWest x SSouth; [Illegible: Siaa]
Pt, NNorth XEEast 1/2EEast, & NNorth end of Cano Isla NNorthXEEast3/4EEast. Got anchor
off the bows.

Merid Meridian (noon)to 4P.M:-
Weather clear, warm & pleasant. Light to
moderate breeze from S.S.W.South Southwest At 1.30 set jib, flying jib,
fore and main topmast stay sails & foresail.
At 3 took in and furled all sails. Standing
up Gulf of Nicoya. At 3:30 Came to anchor off
Punta-Arenas, Costa Rica, in 5 1/4 fathoms of
water, veering to 30 fathoms on starboard anchor
Bearings at anchorage (p.c):
Light house N.W.NorthwestxNNorth 1/2 N.North
Pan de Azucar S.W.SouthwestXWWest
Sent an officer to pay an official visit


48

Extracts from Steam Log
Passage from Gulf of Dulce to Punta Arenas.


May 5 1880 :-
At [Illegible: 8]:15 started fires in Nos Numbers 1. 2. 3. & 4 boilers.
using anthracite coal. Steam formed at 3.05
Warmed engine and tried joints. At 6-30 turned
engine over and found everything working right.
A Regularized: At 7-30 started ahead slow; at 7-33 ahead fast. During
the succeeding 24hrs the engines and boilers worked
well. with the exception of considerable thump in [Illegible: symbol & symbol]
crank pin brasses and disarrangement of the counter.
The average number of revolutions per minute
was 30. and the number of pounds of coal
per hour 608. Average steam pressure per
sq square inch above atmospheric pressure, 58 lbs. Sea
smooth.

May 6:-
Using NosNumbers 1, 2, 3 & 4 boilers. Engines and boilers
working well. At 5.25 A.M. increased no. numberof
revolutions per minute to 36. At 3.35 P.M slowed;
At 3.38 stopped, backed and came to anchor. Commenced
banking fires, and pumping and blowing to change
water in boilers. At 5.15 hauled fires. pumped and
blew boilers, & closed all valves leading outboard.
While steaming, average number of revolutions
was 33.8. and the number of pounds of coal
per hour, 658. Average steam pressure in
lbs. per square inch above atmospheric pressure
was 56.1 lbs.



Put in Scale of Distances
J. A. H.


49

Punta Arenas and the Gulf of Nicoya

Approved
J A Howell
Comdr Commander

The Gulf of Nicoya extends about fifty miles into
the land in a north westerly direction, indent-
ing
Regularized:indenting
the west coast of Central America. It is about
25 miles wide at the entrance, between Port Herradora
and Cape Blanco, but gradually decreases in
width to 6 miles at the upper extremity. There
are numerous islands along the western shore
the largest of which, Chira Island is at the
head of the Gulf. The town of Punta Arenas
is situated on a long narrow strip of land,
extending nearly east and west. The anchorage
for large vessels is to the SdSouth of the town,
although vessels of light draft anchor in the
inlet to the Nd.North We anchored in 5 1/4 fathoms
of water, directly off the wharf. At the anchorage
the flood tide sets about WWest, the ebb in the
contrary direction. In the afte’noon Regularized: afternoon there is
generally a stiff breeze sets in from Sd.South and
Wd.West

Punta Arenas is the principal point for export
of coffee, which is the chief product of Costa
Rica. The carrying trade is done chiefly by
the Pacific Mail Steamship Co.Company and a line
of English clipper ships, although there are
always other ships engaged in trading there.
A long iron wharf enables freight to be handled
very rapidly at any stage of the tide. Freight
is sent off in large lighters. It is now
proposed to connect Punta Arenas with
San Jose, the Capital of Costa Rica, by a
rail roadRegularized:railroad , the contractor for the building of
which is an American. The road is now
partially finished. Punta Arenas has a fine
custom house, with every facility fro the receipt
and export of goods.


50

Log of the United States Steamer Adams
Passage from Punta Arenas

Hour
A.M.
Knots Fath. Fathoms Courses
Steered
WINDS
Direction
WINDS
Force
Leeway Barometer
Height
Inches
Barometer
Ther.
attd
TEMPERATURES
Air
D. Dry B. Bulb
TEMPERATURES
Air
W.Wet B. Bulb
TEMPERATURES
Water
at
Surface
State of
Weather
Form
of
Clouds
Prop. Proportion
Blue
Sky
State
of
Sea
Record of sail
1 At anchor
E.N.E.East Northeast
N.North 0-1 30.05 80 79 797 77 b.c cum cumulus
&
nim nimbus
2 G
2 WWestx NNorth " 1 30.05 80 79 76 " " 2 "
3 WWest x SSouth " 1 30.04 80 79 76 " " 3 "
4 S.W.Southwest " 1 30.04 80 78 76 " " 6 "
5 W.S.W.West-Southwest N.E.Northeast 1 30.04 79 78 76 bcz " 2 "
6 " " 1 30.06 79 78 76 " cir-cum cirro-cumulus
cum cumulus
& nim nimbus
4 "
7 S.S.E.South Southeast EEast 1-2 30.06 79 78 75 " " 3 " Set all f fore & aft sail
& foresail
8 " Calm 0 30.07 80 79 77 b.c. cir-cum cirro-cumulus
cum cumulus
strat stratus
5 "
9 3 3 " N.E.Northeast 0-1 30.10 82 80 77 " " 7 " Took in all f fore & a aft sail
10 3 3 SSouthxEEast SSouthxWWest 0-1 30.11 82 80 77 " " 7 "
11 3 8 SSESouth Southeast SESouth East 2 30.11 83 81 78 " " 7 "
12 3 6 " SSouth.EEast 2 30.10 84 82 78 82 " " 8 "

Lat.Latitude . by Obs’n Observation at noon. ⊙ 9 o 34’34” NNorth
Long.Longitude “ Chronometer from Forenoon Obsn Observation ⊙ 84 o 39’ 30” WWest
Water expended during preceding 24 hrs. 300 gals gallons on hand at noon. 1600

Hour
P.M.
Knots Fath. Fathoms Courses
Steered
WINDS
Direction
WINDS
Force
Leeway Barometer
Height
Inches
Barometer
Ther.
attd
TEMPERATURES
Air
D. Dry B. Bulb
TEMPERATURES
Air
W.Wet B. Bulb
TEMPERATURES
Water
at
Surface
State of
Weather
Form
of
Clouds
Prop. Proportion
Blue
Sky
State
of
Sea
Record of sail
1 3 2 S.S.E.South Southeast S.S.E.South Southeast 2 30.10 84 83 79 b.c. cir-cum cirro-cumulus
strat stratus
6 G
2 3 3 " " 2 30.08 84 83 79 " nimb nimbus 4 "
3 3 8 " S.E.Southeast 2 30.05 85 83 79 " " 2 "
4 4 2 " S.E.Southeast x E.East 1 30.05 84 83 79 83 " " 1 "
5 4 2 " " 1-2 30.04 83 82 78 bc2 " 1 "
6 4 2 " " 1 30.04 83 82 78 " " 1 "
7 4 2 " " 1 30.04 82 81 78 " " 1 "
8 4 4 " " 1 30.06 82 81 78 83 " " 4 "
9 4 2 " " 1 30.07 83 81 78 83 " l cir. cirrus & nimb.nimbus 8 "
10 4 0 " " 1 30.07 83 81 78 83 " " 8 "
11 4 0 " S.S.W.South Southwest 1 30.08 82 81 78 82 " cir.cirrus 8 "
12 4 2 " " 1 30.08 82 81 78 82 " cir.cirrus 7 "

51

3d rate 6 guns, under the command of J A Howell Anderson
Costa Rica to PaytáPaytáRegularized:Paita, Peru. Friday June 4
Record of Miscellaneous Events

Commences & until 4 AM:-
Light air from N.North Cloudy & cool. Turned ebb at 1.15. Started boilers
under 4 boilers at 12.10.

From 4 to 8 AM: Weather clear, warm & pleasant Calms to
light breeze from N.E.Northeast to E.East At 6-10 called all hands up anchor.
Hove up and secured starboard anchor and started to sea in chge charge
of navigator. At 730 set all fore & aft sail and foresail.

8AM to Meridian:- Clear and pleasant. Light breeze from
N.E.Northeast shifting to SSouth X WWest, SSouth X EEast. & S.E.Southeast Barometer rising first part of
watch. afterward falling. Steering out of Gulf of Nicoya
in charge of Nav Navigator . At noon took departure Blanco Isl'd.Island
bearing WWest 3/4 SSouth (p.c.) Cano Island N.N.E.North Northeast (p.c.) Cir cum strat cirrus, cumulus stratusclouds
Ship rolling & pitching a little. Light ground swell from Sd.South At
9-30 inspected at quarters. Apprentices instructed in Geography at
10. At 9 took in all fore & aft sail.

MeridMeridian (noon) to 4 P.M.:- Light breeze from SSESouth Southeast first half, then
from S.E.Southeast decreasing to light airs. Cloudy & pleasant but
threatening rain toward end of watch. Under steam
alone. Course (p.c) S.S.E.South Southeast

From 4 to 6 P.M:- Cloudy, hazy, warm & pleasant. Light airs
to light breeze from S.E.Southeast XEEast. Barom. Barometer steady. Under steam
alone. Course (p.c.) S.S.E.South Southeast Bearings at 6 (pc) Cape Blanco N.W.Northwest X
WWest 1/2 WWest Cano Island NNorth X WWest 3/4 WWest
from 6 to 8 PM: Weather clear, warm, & pleasant. Light air from SESoutheast X EEast. Exercised at company drill. Marine
Guard at manual. Ship on course SSESouth Southeast at end of watch
Temp Temperature of coal bunkers 104 o

From 8 PM to Mid Midnight :- Light airs from S.E.Southeast x EEast hauling
to S.S.W.South Southwest Warm & pleasant. Bright starlight. Cumulus
and nimbus clouds. Barometer rising slowly.
Ship rolling and pitching easily to ground swell.
Ship on course SSESouth Southeast at end of watch.


52

Log of the U.S. Steamer “Adams” (3d Rate)
Passage from Punta Arenas C.R. Costa Rica to

2
Hour
A.M.
KNOTS FATH. Fathoms Courses Winds
Direct. Direction
Winds
For. Force
Leew. Leeway Barometer
Height
Barometer
Ther
Temperature
D.Dry B. Bulb
Temperature
W. Wet B. Bulb
Temperature
Water
State
of
Weather
Form
of
Clouds
Perc Percent
B. Blue
Sky
State
of
Sea
Record of sail
1 4 0 SSESouth Southeast WSWWest Southwest 1 30.05 82 81 78 82 b.c cum cumulus
nim nimbus
7 SG
2 4 2 " S.W.Southwest 1-2 30.02 81 80 76 82 " " 4 "
3 4 2 " " 1 30.01 81 80 77 82 " " 2 "
4 4 4 " " 2 30.01 82 81 77 82 " " 2 "
5 4 4 " SSWSouth Southwest 2-3 30.02 82 81 77 82 bcqtc " 1 "
6 4 6 " S.W.Southwest 2 30.03 80 80 76 82 " u " 1 "
7 3 4 " SSWSouth Southwest 1 30.05 80 79 76 82 crqt " 0 "
8 4 0 " " 1 30.05 80 79 76 82 bcdq cir-cum cirro-cumulus
& strat stratus
1 "
9 4 2 " " 1 30.05 81 80 77 82 bc "
& nimb nimbus
3 G
10 4 2 " " 1 30.07 82 81 78 83 " " 3 "
11 4 0 " " 1 30.06 82 81 78 83 " " 3 "
12 4 2 " " 1 30.04 82 81 78 83 " " 2 "

Dist Distance run by log since preceding noon. 9.7.7 knots
Lat. Latitude by D.R.Dead Reckoning at noon NNorth 8 o 00’34” Long. Longitude DR. 84 o14’WWest
Lat. Latitude by Obs. Observation Noon ⊙ NNorth 8 o 02 36. Long.Longitude Obs.Observation ⊙ 84 o 02’16”WWest
Current during the time 0 knots 5 lengths per hour, set EEast 1/2 NNorth
Variation of Compass by Azimuth ⊙ 8 AM EEast 6 o 36’
Water expended during preceding 24 hrs. 300; ahead, 1300.

P.M. KNOTS FATH. Fathoms Courses Winds
Direct. Direction
Winds
For. Force
Leew. Leeway Barometer
Height
Barometer
Ther
Temperature
D.Dry B. Bulb
Temperature
W. Wet B. Bulb
Temperature
Water
State
of
Weather
Form
of
Clouds
Perc Percent
B. Blue
Sky
State
of
Sea
Record of sail
1 5 0 SSESouth Southeast WSWWest Southwest 2 30.05 78 77 76 84 ocqr nim nimbus 0 L
2 6 6 " WSWWest Southwest 2 30.04 79 78 76 82 " " 0 "
3 6 0 " S.W.Southwest 2 30.02 79 78 76 82 " " 0 "
4 6 0 S.ESoutheast. XSSouth " 2 30.00 79 78 76 82 oc cir cum cirro-cumulus
nim nimbus
0 "
5 5 8 " SW 3 30.00 79 78 76 82 ocrg " 0 "
6 5 8 SSESouth Southeast NW 3 30.02 79 78 76 82 bc " 1 "
7 5 8 " WSWWest Southwest 4 30.01 79 78 76 82 oc " 0 M
8 5 8 " SSouth 4 30.03 80 78 76 82 " " 0 "
9 6 0 SSouthxEEast1/4EEast S.E.Southeast 4 30.05 80 78 76 82 ocq " 0 M
10 6 4 " SSouthxWWest 4 30.06 80 78 76 82 ocwrq " 0 "
11 6 0 " S.W.SouthwestxWWest 4-5 30.09 80 78 76 82 " " 0 "
MidMidnight 6 2 " WSWWest Southwest 3 30.10 79 78 75 82 bcd " 1

Longitude by Chronometer from P.M. Obsn Observation . WWest. 83 o 19’30”




53

6 guns under the command of J Astonell. Comdr Commander USN
PaytáRegularized:Paita, Peru June 5, 1880.

From MeridMeridian (noon) to 4 AM:-
Gentle to moderate breeze from WSWWest Southwest. Threatening weather
first two hours, with passing showers of light rain. Drizzling
rain last two hours. Barometer rising slowly. Nimb Nimbus and
cum cumulus clouds. Flashes of lightening in SdSouthward & Eastern horizon. At
1 set flying jib.

From 4 to 8 am
Gentle breeze from WSW.West Southwest until about 6-30 when it shifted
to S.S.W.South Southwest Took in & furled all square sail. At 7.15 took in
fore and aft sail Overcast and cloudy, with drizzling rain.
Barometer rising 30.01 to 30.05

From 8AM to MeridMeridian (noon):-
Wind light and variable, shifting between S.W.Southwest & E.S.EEast Southeast. Weather
overcast, with a light drizzling rain during first hour at 9-40
run the ship off to S.E.SoutheastxSSouth and set square sail except togallantstopgallants
At 10 took in m. topmast stays'lstaysail to rain squall from S.W.Southwest & afterward,
the wind hauling to S.W.Southwest, at 10.15, took in all plain sail &
brought ship back to old course. SSouth xEEast 1/2EEast. At 11, took in fore & aft sail
At 11-30 set the fore topmast staysail jib & spanker.

MeridMeridian (noon) to 4 P.M:-
Overcast, squally, cloudy & rainy. Light breeze from ESWEast Southwest x WWest. & S.W.Southwest until
3-30. At 2 set all sail except flying jib & fore trysail. Main togallant topgallant
yard rope parted; wove new one. Bar Barometer falling slowly.

From 4 to 6 P.M:-
Gentle breezes from S.W.Southwest x WWest. Overcast & cloudy, with rain squalls
during first part of watch. Barom.Barometer rising. At 4.05 took in and
furled tops'ls topsails and togallant topgallant sails, & hauled up foresail. At 4-30 set
foresail and flying jib

From 6 to 8 P.M:-
Moderate W.S.W. West Southwest breeze. Overcast & cloudy. Barm.Barometer rising. Sea moderate

8PM to Midnight:-
Weather cloudy and during first hour threatening to the
Nd. Northward During the second and third hours raining gently
for the greater part of the time, last hour drizzling
but clearing toward end of watch. Wind generally
steady from S.W.SouthwestxWWest, occasionally hauling a couple
of points to the SdSouthward. Hauled down flying jib at 11. Bar-
ometer
Regularized: Barometer
steady.


54

Passage of USS Adams Log for June 6 1880.

Hour.
A.M.
Knots Fath. Fathoms Course Winds
Direc Direction
Winds
Force
Leeway Barometer
Height
Barometer
Ther.
Temperatures
D.Dry B. Bulb
Temperatures
W. Wet B. Bulb
Temperatures
SeaW. Sea Water
State
of the
Weather
by symbols
Form
of
Clouds
Prop Proportion
Blue Sky
Sea
1 6 0 SSouth xEEast1/2EEast W.S.W.West Southwest 3 30.00 82 80 78 83 ocl NimbNimbus
Cumcumulus
0 L
2 6 2 " " 3 30.00 81 80 78 83 ocd " 0 "
3 6 5 " " 3-4 30.01 81 79 77 82 od " 0 "
4 6 5 " " 3 30.01 81 79 77 82 " " 0 "
5 6 0 " " 3 30.01 80 79 77 83 " " 0 "
6 5 8 " " 3 30.00 80 79 77 83 oc. " 0 "
7 4 2 " S.S.W.South Southwest 3 30.05 80 79 77 83 o.c.r. Cir-CumCirro-cumulus
& NimbNimbus
0 "
8 4 1 " " 3 30.05 80 79 77 83 vcd " 0 "
9 4 4 " S.W.Southwest 3 30.06 80 79 76 82 " " 0 "
10 2
2
2
0
"
S.E.Southeast 1/2 SSouth
" 2 30.07 79 77 76 82 rg " 0 "
11 4 0 "
SSouth x EEast 1/2 SSouth
S.E.Southeast 1-4 30.06 79 77 76 82 " NimbNimbus 0 "
Noon 4 4 " E.S.E.East Southeast 1 30.06 78 77 76 82 " " 0 "

Distance run by log since preceding noon 121 knots 7 tenths
Latitude by D.R.Dead Reckoning at noon N 6 o 03'3x" LongLongitude 83o 32' 45"
do " Obs. No observations
Water Expended during preceding 24 hrshours 300galsgallons, on hand 1000 galsgallons

Hour.
P.M.
Knots Fath. Fathoms Course Winds
Direc Direction
Winds
Force
Leeway Barometer
Height
Barometer
Ther.
Temperatures
D.Dry B. Bulb
Temperatures
W. Wet B. Bulb
Temperatures
SeaW. Sea Water
State
of the
Weather
by symbols
Form
of
Clouds
Prop Proportion
Blue Sky
Sea
1 5 0 SSouthxEEast1/2EEast EEast 2 30.05 78 77 76 82 cqr nimbnimbus 0 L
2 5 6 " S.W.Southwest 2 30.04 79 78 76 82 " " 0 "
3 6 0 " " 2 30.02 79 78 76 82 " " 0 "
4 6 0 SSouth x EEast 3/4 EEast " 2 30.00 79 78 76 82 o.c. cir-cum nimb.Cirro-Cumulous, Nimbus 0 "
5 5 8 S.S.E.South Southeast S.W.Southwest x WWest 3 30.00 79 78 76 82 c.r.g. " 0 "
6 5 8 SSouth x EEast 1/2 EEast W.S.W.West Southwest 3 30.02 79 78 76 82 v.o. " 1 "
7 5 8 " " 4 30.01 79 78 76 82 v.c. " 0 M
8 5 8 " " 4 30.03 80 78 76 82 " " 0 "
9 6 0 " S.W.Southwest x WWest 4 30.05 80 78 76 82 ocqb " 0 "
10 6 4 " " 4 30.06 80 78 76 82 ocwrg " 0 "
11 6 6 " " 4-5 30.09 80 78 76 82 " " 0 "
MidMidnight 6 2 " " 3 30.10 79 78 75 82 bcd " 0 "

Longitude by Chronometer from P.M. Observation ⊙ WWest 83o 19' 30"

[3]

57

Punta Arenas, Costa Rica to PaytáRegularized:Paita, Peru

Midnight to 4A.M.:-

Light airs and breeze from N.S.W.North Southwest & S.W.Southwest Weather
pleasant. Barometer falling. At 1-20 set foresail and all
fore & aft sail except fore trysail.

4 to 8 A.M.:-

Cool & pleasant. Cloudy & hazy until 6 A.M. Threatening
weather from the Sd.Southward At 6, began to rain, accompanied by
occasional peals of thunder. At 7-45 began to clear up.
Light airs to gentle breeze from S.S.W.South Southwest and S.W.Southwest during first two
hours. Light breeze and airs from S.S.W.South Southwest during remainder
of watch. At 4.30 set fore & aft sail; at 5-30 took it in. At 5-29
stopped engines to [move] coupling.

From 8 A.M. to MeridMeridian (noon):-

Light airs from S.S.W.South Southwest shifting to S.W. Southwest Latter part. Weather
clear, warm & pleasant. Bar.Barometer rising first half, falling last
half. At 8.15 sighted Sal-si-puedes on port beam. At 11.50
set foresail & flying jib.

MeridMeridian (noon) to 4 P.M.:-

Light to gentle breezes from N.S.W.North Southwest, shifting to S.W.Southwest
latter part. Weather clear warm & pleasant. Cirrus-cum.
cirrus. cumulus. & mist clouds. Barometer falling 30.04 to 29.97.
At 2 set all square sail except mainsail. At 3.12 changed
course to S.E.SoutheastxSSouth. By order of Comdg. Offr.Commanding Officer No.Number of revolutions was
increased to thirty at noon.

4 to 6 P.M.

Gentle breeze from S.W.Southwest Cloudy & overcast last hour. At 5.45 took
in and furled all square sail & changed course to S.S.ESouth Southeast.
Rain squall last hour with wind shift ahead. After it
had passed wind came out again from S.W.Southwest

6 to 8 P.M.-: Weather cloudy with a drizzling rain
during early part of first hour; & passing shower during
second hour. Breeze light, decreasing & hauling
from W.S.W.West Southwest to SSouth. Patent log at 8 showed 41 1/4 miles

8 P.M. to Midnight

Light and gentle breeze from S.E.Southeast, SSouth x WWest, S.W.Southwest x WWest
& W.S.WWest Southwest. Cool and pleasant. Light rain at 9. Bar.Barometer
rising first half, falling last half. Set all
plain sail, main topmast stays'lstaysail & main trysail
at 11.15.


58

Log of U.S.S. Adams. June 7. 1880 Passage

Hour.
A.M.
Knots Fath.Fathoms Course Winds
DirecDirection
Winds
Force
Leeway Barometer
Height
Barometer
Ther.
Temperatures
D.DryB.Bulb
Temperatures
W.Wet B.Bulb
Temperatures
W.Sea Water
State
of the
Weather
Forms
of
Clouds
PropProportion
B.Blue Sky
Sea
1 5 4 SSouth xEEast 1/2EEast S.W.Southwest x WWest 2 30.08 78 77 75 82 ocd Cir-CumCirro-Cumulus
NimbNimbus
0 L
2 4 8 " " 2 30.07 79 78 76 82 ocg " 0 "
3 5 0 " " 3 30.05 79 77 75 82 ocrq " 0 "
4 5 2 " " 3 30.04 79 77 75 82 ocq " 0 "
5 6 0 " " 3-4 30.03 78 78 76 82 oc " 0 "
6 7 2 " " 3 -4 30.05 79 78 76 82 " " 0 "
7 6 2 " " 2 30.05 79 78 76 82 ocrg " 0 "
8 6 0 " SWSouthwest 2 30.04 79 78 76 82 ocr " 0 "
9 6 0 " " 2 30.05 79 78 76 82 " " 0 "
10 6 2 " " 2 30.06 80 78 76 82 " " 0 "
11 6 2 " E.N.E.East Northeast 2-3 30.07 79 77 75 82 ocrg cum nimbcumulo-nimbus 0 "
Noon 6 0 " N.W.Northwest 2-1 30.07 78 77 75 82 " " 0 "

Distance run by log since preceding noon 141.2 knots
Lat.Latitude by D.R.Dead Reckoning at noon:- N.North 3o 44'15"; LongLongitude EEastR. 82o 54WWest
" " ObsObservation " " ⊙N.North 3o 48'43"
Water expending during preceding 24 hours. 300 gals; rec'dreceived 400 gals.
On hand fit for use: 1100.

Knots Fath.Fathoms Course Winds
DirecDirection
Winds
Force
Leeway Barometer
Height
Barometer
Ther.
Temperatures
D.DryB.Bulb
Temperatures
W.Wet B.Bulb
Temperatures
W.Sea Water
State
of the
Weather
Forms
of
Clouds
PropProportion
B.Blue Sky
Sea
1 5 4 SSouthxEEast1/2EEast WWest 1 30.05 78 77 75 82 ocd cum nimbcumulo-nimbus 0
2 5 0 " " 1 30.03 78 77 75 82 " " 0
3 5 2 " NENortheast 2 30.05 78 77 75 82 ocr " 0
4 5 4 " " 2-3 30.06 78 76 75 82 " " 0
5 5 2 " " 1 30.03 78 76 75 82 bc cum nimb strascumulo-nimbus stratus 1
6 5 2 SSouth1/4EEast SWSouthwestxWWest 1 30.05 78 76 75 82 " " 1
7 5 2 " W.S.W.West Southwest 2 30.05 79 77 75 81 " " 4
8 5 4 " WWest 3 30.06 79 77 75 81 " " 5 Set fores'lforesail; m. topmast
stays'lstaysail, flying jib & M.
trysail.
9 5 6 " " 2 30.10 79 77 75 81 " " 2
10 5 4 " " 2 30.12 79 77 75 81 " " 2
11 5 2 " WWestxSSouth 2 30.12 79 77 76 81 " " 6 Took in fores'lforesail
Mid.Midnight 5 0 " S.W.Southwest 2 30.12 79 77 75 80 " " 8

Long.Longitude by Chro.Chronometer from P.M. ObsnObservationWWest. 82o 20'.


59

from Punta Arenas to PaytáRegularized:Paita, Peru

Mid.Midnight to 4 A.M.:-

Light airs to gentle breeze from SWSouthwest x WWest. Cool & pleasant.
Overcast & cloudy. Squally from SWSouthwest. Rain about 3 A.M. BaromBarometer
falling slowly. At 3.30 took in foresail & main topmast
staysail.

4 to 8 A.M.:-

Gentle to moderate breezes from SWSouthwest xWWest, decreasing to light
breeze & hauling to S.W.Southwest last hour. Threatening weather, with
rain squalls during latter part of watch. Barom.Barometer rising
first part of watch, afterwards falling. At 5 set flying jib
and main topmast staysail. At 6.22 stopped Engine to
move and oil both clutch couplings. Started ahead at 6-30.

From 8 A.M. to MeridMeridian (noon):-

Light breeze first two hours from SWSouthwest; hauled ahead
and then died out; came out in a few minutes from N.N.E.North Northeast ,
shifting toward end of watch to NWNorthwest. Overcast & cloudy, drizzling
& raining. Under fore & aft sail except fore trysail at first
Set foresail at 9. Wind hauling ahead took in fores'lforesail, m. tops'ltopsail
staysail & trysail at 10.15. At 11 set foresail again.

Merid.Meridian (noon). to 4 P.M.:-

Overcast & drizzling rain during the watch. Light airs
from the WWest & light to gentle breeze from NENortheast. Bar.Barometer falling
slowly. By order of Comd'g Offr.Commanding Officer number of revolutions was
decreased to 30 per minute at 12-30. Under steam, fores'lforesail,
head sails & spanker.

4 to 6P.M.:-

Light airs from NENortheast first part of watch. Shifted to SWSouthwest xWWest.
Cool & pleasant. Cloudy sky; indicating rain. Bar.Barometer rising slowly.
Took in flying jib & foresail at 5. At 5 changed course to SSouth1/4EEast.

6 to 8P.M.:-

Light breeze from WSWWest Southwest first hour, increasing to gentle breeze
& veering to WWest last hour. Threatening weather, but clearing.
Mist & CumCumulus clouds. Bar.Barometer rising. At 7-30 fly.flying jib m.t. stays'lstaysail,
& main trysail. At 7.50 took in foresail.

8 P.M. to MidMidnight:-

Light breeze from WWest, hauling to WWest xSSouth & S.W.Southwest during latter
half of watch. At first cloudy & sprinkling a little
during first hour. Clearing off toward latter part.
Took in foresail at 11.15


60

Log of U.S.S. Adams (3d Rate) June 8, 1880

Hour.
A.M.
Knots Fath.Fathoms Course Winds
DirecDirection
Winds
Force
Leew'yLeeway BAROMET'RBarometer
Ht.Height in inches
BAROMET'RBarometer
Ther.
Temperature
D.DryB.Bulb
Temperature
W.Wet B.Bulb
Temperature
SeaW.Sea Water
State
of
Weather
Form
of
Clouds
PropProportion
Blue Sky
State
of
Sea
Record of Sail
1 5 2 SSouth1/4EEast SWSouthwest 2-3 30.10 78 77 75 81 bcz cum. nimb.cumulo-nimbus 5 SSmooth
2 4 8 " S.S.W.South Southwest 2 30.07 78 77 75 80 " " 7 "
3 4 8 " SSouth x WWest 2 30.07 77 77 75 80 " " 5 "
4 4 0 " " 2 30.07 77 77 75 80 " " 5 "
5 4 8 " SSouth 2 30.09 79 77 75 80 bc " 4 "
6 4 4 " " 2 30.09 78 77 75 80 " cir-cum nimb.cirro-cumulus nimbus 3 "
7 4 0 " " 2 30.12 78 77 75 80 " " 2 "
8 5 4 " " 1-2 30.13 79 78 75 80 " " 6 "
9 6 0 " " 2 30.16 79 78 76 81 " " 4 "
10 5 9 " SSouth x WWest 2 30.16 80 78 76 81 " cir. cum cirro-cum Cirrus, Cumulus, and Cirro-Cumulus 1 "
Noon11 5 8 " " 2 30.15 80 78 76 81 o.c. " 0 "
Noon 6 0 " SSouth x EEast 2 30.15 80 78 76 81 b.c. cir-cum & cumcirro-cumulus & cumulus 1 "

Distance run by log since preceding noon 125.3 knots
Lat.Latitude by D.R.Dead Reckoning at noon N.North 1o 44'00; Long.Longitude D.R.Dead Reckoning 82o 19'30"WWest.
Lat.Latitude by Obs.Observation at noon ⊙ N.North 1o 31'02; Long.Longitude by Obs.Observation ⊙ 82o 20'
VarVariation. of compass by Asimuth as 752 A.M. E.East 6' 12"
Water expended during preceding 24 hours 250 galsgallons; rec'd.received 50 galsgallons.
On hand fit for use at noon 900 galsgallons.

Hour Knots Fath.Fathoms Course Winds
DirecDirection
Winds
Force
Leew'yLeeway BAROMET'RBarometer
Ht.Height in inches
BAROMET'RBarometer
Ther.
Temperature
D.DryB.Bulb
Temperature
W.Wet B.Bulb
Temperature
SeaW.Sea Water
State
of
Weather
Form
of
Clouds
PropProportion
Blue Sky
State
of
Sea
Record of Sail
1 5 8 SSouth1/4EEast SSouthxEEast 2 30.14 80 75 78 80 oc cir-cum nimbcirro-cumulous & nimbus 0 SSmooth
2 5 8 SSouthxEEast " 2 30.10 80 75 78 80 " " 0 "
3 5 8 " " 2-3 30.06 80 75 78 80 " " 0 "
4 5 6 " " 3 30.05 80 75 78 80 " " 0 "
5 5 6 " " 3-4 30.06 79 75 78 80 " " 0 M
6 6 0 " " 3-4 30.07 79 74 77 80 " " 0 "
7 6 0 " " 3-4 30.08 79 74 76 79 " " 0 "
8 6 0 " " 3-4 30.08 78 73 76 79 b.c. " 0 "
9 5 6 " SSouth SWSouthwest 3-4 30.10 78 73 76 78 o.c.u cum & nimbcumulo-nimbus 7 S
10 5 8 " " 4 30.10 76 73 75 78 " " 0 "
11 6 2 " " 3 30.10 76 73 75 78 " " 0 "
Mid.Midnight 6 4 " " 3 30.10 76 72 75 78 " " 0 "

Long.Longitude by ChroChronometer from P.M. ObsnObservation⊙ : No obsnobservation. Cloudy.


61

Passage from Punta Arenas to PaytáRegularized:Paita, Peru

From Mid.Midnight to 4 A.M.

Weather pleasant with gentle to light breeze from
S.W.Southwest to SSouth x WWest. At 2 took in main trysail and hauled down
fore, topmast staysail and at 2.15 took in the rest of
the fore & aft sail. BarBarometer falling slowly. Smooth Sea.

4 to 8 AM:

Weather clear + pleasant. Light breeze from SSouth. At
6.45 furled foresail. At 7.30 commenced to take crew
out of bunkers on account of heating. Temperature of
bunker 128o. Ship on course SSouth1/4EEast at End of watch.

8 A.M. to MeridMeridian (noon):-

Light breeze from SSouth first hour, SSouth x WWest next two hours,
& S.E.Southeast last hour. Warm & pleasant. Sky being overcast but
commencing to clear towards end of watch. Cirrus, cumulus, &
cirro-cum. clouds. BarBarometer rising to 30.16 first hour, then falling to
30.15 at 11 A.M. & then steady. At 9.45 mustered dins ins at
quarters. At 10, apprentices were instructed in arithmetic by
schoolmaster.

MeridMeridian (noon) to 4 P.M:-

Light breeze from SSouth x EEast, increasing toward end of
watch to gentle breeze. Overcast, cloudy + cool. Under
steam alone. Changed course at 1 P.M. from SSouth1/4EEast to SSouthxEEast
BarBarometer 30.05

4 to 6 P.M:-

Overcast, cloudy, cool & pleasant. Gentle to moderate breeze
from SSouth x EEast. BarBarometer steady. Under steam alone. At 5.40
beat to quarters and exercised divisions as per routine.

6 to 8 P.M:-

Gentle to moderate breeze from SSouth x EEast. Cool & pleasant. Bar.Barometer steady.

8 P.M. to Mid.Midnight

Gentle to moderate breeze from S.S.WSouth Southwest. Overcast &
cloudy with occasional showers of light, misty rain.
Barbarometer rising to and remaining steady at 30.10. Cum.Cumulus &
nimbnimbus clouds.


62

Log of U.S.S. Adams 3d Rate June 9. 1880

Hour.
A.M.
Knots Fath.Fathoms Course Winds
Direction
Winds
Force
Leeway Barometer
Height
inches
Ther. Temperatures
D.Dry DryB.Bulb
Temperatures
W.Wet WetB.Bulb
Temperatures
Sea
State
of
Weather
Form
of
Clouds
PropProportion
Blue Sky
State
of
Sea
Record of Sail
1 5 2 SSouthxEEast SSouth x WWest 2 30.12 75 74 72 78 ocd Cum
+
Nimb.
0 M Set all f. & a.fore & aft sail
2 5 8 " " 2 30.12 75 74 72 76 " " 0 " Except foresail &
3 5 8 " SSouth 2 30.09 75 74 72 76 o.c. " 0 " m. top staysl
4 5 6 " " 2 30.09 75 74 72 77 " " 0 " Took all sail in at 1.15
5 5 0 " SSouthxEEast 3 30.08 75 74 71 77 " " 0 "
6 4 4 " " 3 30.10 75 74 71 77 " " 0 "
7 4 0 " " 3 30.13 75 74 71 76 " " 0 "
8 4 2 " " 3 30.15 75 74 71 76 " " 0 "
9 4 4 " " 4 30.15 76 74 72 76 " Cir Cum
Nimb
Cirrus and Cumulo-Nimbus
0 "
10 5 2 " " 4 30.16 76 74 71 76 " " 0 " Set all f. & a.fore & aft sails
11 6 2 S.E.Southeast " 4 30.15 75 73 71 76 bc " 1 "
Noon 6 4 " " 4 30.12 74 73 71 76 " " 1 "

Distance run by Log since preceding Noon 132.8 knots
LatLatitude by D.R.Dead Reckoning at Noon SSouth 0o 39' 40" ; LongLongitude D.R.Dead Reckoning W. 82o 07' 00"
LatLatitude by ObsObservation " " ⊙ SSouth 0o 42' 44" LongLongitude AM ObsObservationWWest 82o 10'45.
Water expended during preceding 24 hours, 250gals; on hand 650gals.

Hour.
P.M.
Knots Fath.Fathoms Course Winds
Direction
Winds
Force
Leeway Barometer
Height
inches
Ther. Temperatures
D.Dry DryB.Bulb
Temperatures
W.Wet WetB.Bulb
Temperatures
Sea
State
of
Weather
Form
of
Clouds
PropProportion
Blue Sky
State
of
Sea
Record of Sail
1 6 0 SESoutheast SSouth 4 30.11 74 73 70 75 oc Cir
cum
Cirro-Cumulus
0 M
2 6 2 " " 4 30.07 74 73 70 75 " " 0 "
3 6 2 " " 4 30.05 74 73 70 75 b.c. " 2 "
4 6 1 " " 4 30.04 74 72 70 75 " " 1 "
5 5 8 " " 4 30.04 74 72 70 74 " " 1 "
6 5
0
4
8
S.E.Southeast1/2SSouth " 4 30.05 73 72 70 74 " " 1 "
7 6 6 " " 4 30.08 73 72 69 73 " circum stratCirro-Cumulo-Stratus 5 "
8 6 4 " " 3-4 30.07 73 72 69 73 " " 7 "
9 6 2 S.S.E.South Southeast 3/4 EEast " 3-4 30.12 74 72 69 73 " " 7 "
10 3
3
1
1
S.S.E.South Southeast
S.S.E.South Southeast 1/2 EEast
" 4 30.13 74 72 69 73 " Cir cum nimbCirro-Cumulus & Nimbus 5 "
11 6 2 " " 4 30.13 74 72 69 74 " " 7 "
Mid 6 8 " " 4 30.14 74 72 69 74 " " 7 "

Longitude by Chronometer from PM ObsObservationsWWest82o 08'18"


63

Passage from Punta Arenas to PaytáRegularized:Paita, Peru

Merid to 4AM

Gentle SSouth x WWest & SSouth breezes. Weather overcast, hazy & drizzling.
Sea moderate. Barometer falling.

From 4 to 8 A.M.

Gentle breeze from SSouth x EEast. Overcast, cloudy & cool. On course SSouth x EEast.
Under steam alone. Barom.Barometer rising, 30.08 to 30.15

From 8A.M. to Merid.Meridian (noon)

Moderate breezes from SSouth x EEast. Cool & pleasant. Barom.Barometer falling
slowly. Mustered crew at quarters at 9.30. Exercised divisions
per routine. At 10 changed course to S.E.Southeast and set all fore
and aft sail.

From Merid.Meridian (noon) to 4P.M.

Sky overcast. Clear and pleasant. Moderate sea
and breeze from SSouth. Ship rolling and pitching easily.
Barometer falling. Cir. and Cum.cirrus and Cumulus clouds. Steering course
S.E.Southeast through watch. At 4 land was reported from
mast head. Bearing about E.S.E.East Southeast.

From 4 to 6 P.M.

Moderate breeze from SdSouthward. Overcast & cool. Steam & all
fore & aft sail. Changed course at 5.52 from S.E.Southeast to S.E.Southeast1/2SSouth.
Mustered at quarters at 5.40.

6 to 8P.M.

Weather clear & present with moderate to gentle breeze
from the SSouth. Under steam & fore and aft sail.

From 8P.M. to Midnight

Gentle to moderate breeze from SSouth. Clear and
pleasant. Barometer rising slowly. Under steam and
all fore & aft sail. On course SSESouth Southeast1/2EEast at end of watch.


64

Log of U.S.S. Adams (3d Rate) June 10. 1880

Hour.
A.M.
Knots Fath.Fathoms Courses
Steered
Winds
DirecDirection
Winds
Force
Leeway Barometer
Height
in
inches
Barometer
Ther.
Temperature
D.DryB.Bulb
Temperature
W.Wet B.Bulb
Temperatures
Sea
State
of
Weather
Form
of
Clouds
PropProportion
Blue Sky
State
of
Sea
Record of Sail
1 1
4
2
4
S.S.E.South Southeast 1/2 EEast
SSESouth Southeast
SSWSouth Southwest 4 30.14 73 71 69 74 b.c. Circum Cumcirro-Cumulous & Cumulus 8 M All fore & aft sail
2 5 2 " " 4 30.12 73 71 69 74 " Circum Nimbcirro-Cumulus & Nimbus 3 "
3 5 4 " " 4 30.11 73 71 69 74 o.c. " 0 "
4 5 4 " " 4 30.11 72 70 68 74 " " 0 "
5 4 8 " " 4 30.09 71 70 68 74 b.c. " 2 "
6 2
2
4
4
"
SSESouth Southeast1/2EEast
" 4 30.09 71 70 68 74 " " 2 "
7 5 0 " " 4 30.10 71 69 67 74 " " 2 " Took in flying jib
8 5 2 " " 4 30.10 71 69 67 73 " " 2 "
9 4
1
4
0
"
S.E.Southeast1/2SSouth
" 4 30.10 71 69 67 73 " " 3 "
10 4
1
8
6
"
S.E.SoutheastxSSouth
SSouthxWWest 4 30.11 71 70 67 73 " " 6 "
11 6 4 " " 4 30.11 71 70 68 72 " " 7 "
Noon 6 6 " " 4 30.07 71 70 68 72 " " 5 "

Distance run by log since preceding noon, 140.3 knots.
Latitude by D.R.Dead Reckoning at noon SSouth 2o 50'08" LongLongitude WWest81o14'
Longitude by obsObservation ⊙ Noon SSouth 2o40'21 LongLongitude by chrochronometer 7 obsObservationWWest81o6'15"
Current during the time: Rate .4 knots pr hour. Set WWest1/2N.North
Water expended during preceding 24 hrs: 250 gals. Condensed: 150 gals, on hand: 550gal.

Hour
Knots Fath.Fathoms Courses
Steered
Winds
DirecDirection
Winds
Force
Leeway Barometer
Height
in
inches
Barometer
Ther.
Temperature
D.DryB.Bulb
Temperature
W.Wet B.Bulb
Temperatures
Sea
State
of
Weather
Form
of
Clouds
PropProportion
Blue Sky
State
of
Sea
Record of Sail
PM
1
6 2 S.E.SoutheastxSSouth SSouthxWWest 3 30.03 71 70 68 71 bcg Cir cum
strat
Cirro-Cumulus & Stratus
8 M
2 5
1
8
4
"
S.S.E.South Southeast
S.W.Southwest 3 30.01 71 70 68 71 " " 8 "
3 6 4 SSouth1/2WWest " 3 30.01 71 70 68 71 " Cir
Cirro-
Cum
Cirrus & Cirro-Cumulus
8 "
4 6 0 " S.W.SouthwestxWWest 3 30.02 71 70 67 70 " " 5 "
5 4
1
5
5
"
SSouthxWWest
S.W.Southwest 3 30.05 72 69 67 70 " " 8 "
6 6 0 " " 2 30.05 71 69 67 69 " NimbNimbus 1 "
7 5 0 S.S.W.South Southwest " 3 30.05 71 68 66 68 " " 6 "
8 5 2 " " 3 30.09 71 68 66 70 " " 4 " Took in all f & afore and aft sail
9 1
4
0
4
"
S.S.W.South Southwest 1/2WWest
" 3 30.14 70 69 67 70 " Cum
Nimb
Cumulo-Nimbus
1 "
10 5 8 " S.S.W.South Southwest 3 30.15 70 68 66 70 o.c.z " 0 "
11 5 4 " " 3 30.15 69 68 66 70 " " 0 "
Md 5 4 " " 2 30.15 69 68 66 79 " " 0 "

LongLongitude by Chronometer from P.M. ObsObservationWWest 80o 52'30"
Var. of Compass by Azimuth at 3.56P.M. { LatLatitude3o
6o15'E
LongLongitude80o50'


65

Passage from Punta Arenas to PaytáRegularized:Paita, Peru

From MeridMeridian (noon) to 4A.M.

Moderate breezes from SSW.South Southwest Clear and pleasant. Sky becoming
overcast latter half of watch. Cir-Cum, cumulus & nimbus clouds
Moderate sea. Barometer falling. Ship rolling & pitching easily. Steering
course SSouthS.ESoutheast1/2 until 12.12, when changed course to SSESouth Southeast— ship on
that course at end of watch.

From 4 to 8 A.M:-

Moderate breeze from SSW.South Southwest Cloudy and cool. Changed course at
5.30 to SS.ESouth Southeast1/2EEast. Stopped engine for (5) five minutes at 6.30 to
oil couplings. Sighted land one point forward port beam
at 6.25 Cape St. Eleva. Hauled down flying jib for repairs at 6.15

From 8A.M. to MeridMeridian (noon):

Weather clear cool & pleasant. Moderate breeze from SSWSouth Southwest &
SSouthxWWest. At 9.30 inspected crew at quarters & exercised as
per routine. At 10, apprentice boys rec'dreceited instruction in
signals. At 8.40 changed course to EEast1/2SSouth and at 9.45 to S.E.SoutheastxSSouth
Under steam & all fore and aft sail except flying
jib.

MeridMeridian (noon) to 4 P.M:-

Gentle breeze from SSouthxWWest, veering to S.W.Southwest then to SWSouthwestxWWest. Cool and
pleasant. Hazy. Barometer falling first half, rising second half of
watch. At 3.50 set flying jib. On course SSouth1/2WWest at end of watch with
all fore & aft sail set.

4 to 6 PM:-

Gentle breeze from SWSouthwest. Clear & pleasant. Cloudy sky, becoming nearly
overcast. Cirro-cum, cumulus & nimbus clouds. Barometer rising to
30.05 and then remaining steady. Moderate sea. Steering course
SSouth1/2WWest until 4.45 then S.W.Southwest until 6 when changed course to SSWSouth Southwest. Mustered
at quarters at 5 45:

6 to 8 PM:

Gentle breeze from SWSouthwest. Cloudy & cool. Hazy. Took in & stowed all fore & aft
sail

From 8 P.M. to Mid.Midnight

Weather overcast, with occasional light flurries of drizzling
rain. Gentle breeze from SWSouthwest to SSWSouth Southwest. At 8-10 changed
course to SSWSouth Southwest 1/2WWest.


66

Log of U.S.S. Adams (3d Rate) June 11. 1880

Hour.
A.M.
Knots Fath.Fathoms Courses
steered
Winds
DirecDirection
Winds
Force
Leeway Barometer
Ht in
inches
Barometer
Ther.
Temperatures
D.DryB.Bulb
Temperatures
W. WetB.Bulb
Temperatures
Sea
State
of
Weather
Form
of
Clouds
PropProportion
Blue
Sky
State of
Sea
1 5 4 S.S.W.South Southwest 1/2 WWest S.S.W.South Southwest 3 30.15 69 67 65 69 o.c.d Cir-Cum CumCirro-Cumulus & Cumulus 0 M
2 5 6 " SSouth 3 30.15 69 67 65 68 " " 0 "
3 6 0 " " 2 30.12 69 67 65 68 b.c. " 3 "
4 6 0 " " 2 30.09 68 66 65 68 o.c. " 0 "
5 1
4
4
0
"
SSouth
" 2 30.09 68 67 65 68 " Cum & NimCumulus & Nimbus 0 S
6 2
2
5
5
"
S.S.E.South Southeast
" 2 30.09 68 67 65 68 " Cir-Cum, Cum-NimCirro-Cumulus, Cumulo-Nimbus 0 "
7 5 1 " " 2 30.11 68 66 65 68 b.c. " 1 "
8 5 3 " " 2 30.15 68 67 65 68 " " 2 " "
9 5 6 " " 2 30.14 68 67 65 68 " Cir-Cum stratCirro-Cumulus and Stratus 2 " "
10 5 8 " " 2 30.14 68 67 65 67 " " 8 " "
11 6 2 " " 2 30.13 69 67 65 67 " " 8 " Set all fore &
Noon 3
3
0
1
"
S.E.Southeast1/2SSouth
" 2-3 30.09 65 67 65 66 " " 9 " aft sail

Lat.Latitude by bearings at noon SSouth 4o 37' Long.Longitude by Bearing WWest 81o24'
Lat.Latitude by ObsObservation at noon ⊙ SSouth4o37'19 Long.Longitude by chrochronometer ObsObservationW.West 81o24
Water expend during preceding 24 hrs: 250 gallons
do condensed do do 350 do
do on hand fit for use at noon 650 do

Hour Knots Fath.Fathoms Courses
steered
Winds
DirecDirection
Winds
Force
Leeway Barometer
Ht in
inches
Barometer
Ther.
Temperatures
D.DryB.Bulb
Temperatures
W. WetB.Bulb
Temperatures
Sea
State
of
Weather
Form
of
Clouds
PropProportion
Blue
Sky
State of
Sea
PM
1
6 6 S.E.Southeast1/2SSouth SSouth 3 30.06 69 67 65 66 bc Cir cumcirro-Cumulus 8 S Set all square sail
2 3
4
4
2
"
S.E.Southeast1/4EEast
SSouth S.W.Southwest 3 30.06 69 67 65 66 " " 8 "
3 8 2 " " 3 30.04 69 67 65 66 " " 8 "
4 2
4
8
8
"
S.E.Southeast1/2SSouth
" 3 30.04 68 66 65 66 " " 8 "
5 " " " " " " " " " "

Standing into Harbor of PaytáRegularized:Paita


67

Passage from Punta Arenas to PaytáRegularized:Paita

From Midnight to 4 A.M.:-

Gentle breeze from S.S.W.South Southwest 1st hour. Shifted to SSouth and
moderated to light breeze. Cool and pleasant.
Light drizzle first half of watch. Barometer falling
slowly. Under steam. On course S.S.W.South Southwest 1/2WWest at end
of watch.

From 4 to 8 A.M.:-

Light breeze from Sd. Southwardlevel and pleasant. Sky
overcast at first, but clearing off toward latter part
of watch. Cirro-cumulus, cumulus and nimbus
clouds. Smooth sea. Barometer rising. Steering
course S.S.W.South Southwest1/2W.West until 4.13 then S.South until 5.30, when course
was changed to S.S.E.South Southeast, and ship on that course at end
of watch. At daybreak sighted land to Ed.Eastward At end
of watch distant land in sight from E.N.E.East Northeast 1/2 EEast to
SESoutheast x EEast.

From 8A.M. to MeridMeridian (noon):-

Light breeze from SSouth. At first cloudy, afterwards clear
& cool. At 11.25 changed course from S.S.E.South Southeast to SESoutheast1/2SSouth.
At 11.30 set all fore & aft sail. Land on port bow & beam.

Merid.Meridian (noon) to 4P.M.

Weather clear & pleasant. Gentle breeze from SSouth
and SSWSouth Southwest. At 1.30 changed course from SESoutheast1/2SSouth to SESoutheast1/4EEast,
made all plain sail, except mainsail. Hauled
down and unbent main topmast staysail
At 1.30 Point Panuas bore (p.c.) NENortheast1/2E.East distant 5
miles. At 3.20 changed course from SESoutheast1/4EEast to SESoutheast1/2SSouth. Made
preparations for evening port. At end of
watch standing into Harbor of PaytáRegularized:Paita.

From 4 to 8P.M.:-: Gentle breeze from S.S.W.South Southwest Cool &
pleasant. Bar.Barometer rising. gradually. Came to anchor
at 5 in Harbor of PaytáRegularized:Paita, Peru 8 1/2 fathoms of
water, 45 fathoms on starboard chain. Captain of
Port paid an official visit to ship. Sent officer ashore
to pay an official visit. US Crusoe paid an
official visit to ship. Bearings from anchorage: (p.c.)
Telegraph Point WWest1/2NNorth. Custom house, SSouthxEEast1/2EEast. Ships
draft forward 12 feet 7 in.


68

The Port of PaytàRegularized:Paita

Paytà Regularized:Paita is, without exception, the best
open port on the coast. The town is
built on the slope at the foot of the
hill on the S.E.Southeast side of the bay. At a
distance the town is scarcely visible,
the houses being of the same color of the
surrounding cliffs. It is the sea port of
the province of Piura. A rail-road
connects Paytá Regularized:Paita with the valley of Piura.
Most of the railroad officials are
Americans. The rolling [...] was manu-
factured
Regularized:manufactured
in Springfield, Mass.Massachusetts and the
locomotives are made at the Baldwin
Works, Philadelphia.

The anchorage is very good everywhere, the
depth varying between ten (10) and five (5)
fathoms near the mile. There is good
holding ground, the bottom being muddy. We
anchored in 8 1/2 fathoms, veering to 45 fathoms
of chain. The winds which come from the
town commence every day about 10 a.m. and
last until evening. The land is so near that
it does not raise any sea.

There is an abundance of fresh provisions
at PaytáRegularized:Paita. Prices are very reasonable. Wood
and water, however, are expensive. All the
water used is brought by the rail-road or by
means of mules from the Chira River.

The principal commerce of the port consists
in the importation of foreign merchandise of
every description and the export of cattle,
hides, cotton, and some articles of less
importance.

Pacific Steam Navigation Company's steamers
from Panama to Wallas stop at PaytáRegularized:Paitá
for coal, there being a large coal hulk
there, the property of the Company.


69

Freight is landed and brought off in
lighters. There are two small wharves
where small boats may land. The custom
house and other public buildings are of
corrugated iron.

The port is enclosed to the N.North & EEast by a steep
cliff, 200 feet high, and so close to the sea
as to leave no beach at some places. The
Southern point is called Telegraph point and
has a signal station. There is telegraphic
communication between Paytá Regularized:Paita and Lima, the
capital of Peru.

While at PaytáRegularized:Paita, general liberty was given
to the crew. The ship was thoroughly painted
outside, and re coaled ship alongside
the P.M.S. Cos hulk.


70

Log of U.S.S. Adams. June 21st. 1880

Hour.
A.M.
Knots Fath.Fathoms Courses
Steered.
Winds
Direction
Winds
Force
Leeway Barometer
Ht.Height in
inches.
Barometer
Temp
Temperatures
D.DryB.Bulb
Temperatures
W.Wet B.Bulb
Temperatures
Sea Water
State
of
Weather
Form
of
Clouds
Percent
of
Clear Sky
State
of
Sea
1 S.E.SoutheastxEEast S.E.Southeast 2 30.13 68 67 64 o.c. Cir-Cum StratCirro-Cumulus & Stratus 0 S
2 " " 1 30.13 68 67 64 " " 0 "
3 " " 3 30.13 68 67 64 " Cum StratCumulo-Stratus 0 "
4 E.S.E.East Southeast E.S.E.East Southeast 2 30.12 68 67 65 " " 0 "
5 " " 2 30.12 69 67 65 " " 0 "
6 EEast " 2 30.12 68 67 65 " " 0 "
7 S.E.SoutheastxEEast " 1 30.15 69 67 64 b.c. " 1 "
8 " " 2 30.14 69 67 64 b.c.z. " 1 "
9 " " 1 30.15 69 68 65 " Circum & cumCirro-Cumulus & Cumulus 1 "
10 S.E.SoutheastxSSouth S.S.E.South Southeast 1 30.14 72 69 65 " " 1 "
11 S.S.E.South Southeast " 1 30.13 71 70 66 " " 2 "
Noon " " 1 30.13 71 71 67 " " 4 "
P.M.
1
0 0 SSouth1/4EEast S.S.E.South Southeast 2 30.12 74 72 67 b.c. Cir & CumCirrus & Cumulus 6 S
2 1 0 WWestxN.North1/2WWest S.W.SouthwestxSSouth 3 30.08 72 68 65 " " 6 "
3 4 0 WWestxN.North " 3 30.07 69 67 65 " " 7 "
4 1 0 S. S.W.South Southwest " 3 30.06 69 67 65 " " 4 "
5 3 0 WWest1/2SSouth S.S.W.South Southwest 2 30.06 69 67 65 b.o.z. Cir-cum cir & cumCirro-Cumulus, cirrus, & Cumulus 6 "
6 3 0 S.E.Southeast1/2EEast " 2 30.07 69 66 64 " " 5 "
7 2 0 WWest x SSouth SSouth x WWest 1-2 30.10 68 66 64 " Cir& cumCirrus & Cumulus 7 "
8 2 4 WWest " 1-2 30.11 68 66 64 " " 8 "
9 2 0 WWest3/4SSouth " 1 30.12 67 66 64 " Cir-cum & stratCirro-Cumulus & Stratus 7 "
10 1 0 W.S.W.West Southwest 1/2 WWest SSouth 1 30.13 67 66 63 " " 7 "
11 1 0 S.W.SouthwestxWWest " 1 30.14 66 65 63 " " 7 "