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"Every text, after all, is a lazy machine asking the reader to do some of its work. What a problem it would be if a text were to say everything the receiver is to understand - it would never end." Umberto Eco, Six Walks in the Fictional Woods

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Title: "Every text, after all, is a lazy machine asking the reader to do some of its work. What a problem it would be if a text were to say everything the receiver is to understand - it would never end." Umberto Eco, Six Walks in the Fictional Woods
Author: Nikolov, Nikolai Panteleev
Advisor: el-Dahdah, Fares
Degree: Master of Architecture thesis
Abstract: We all have the desire for architecture that is fleeting, that is not fixed, hard to capture, even impossible to master. And build. But we also have the desire, the impulse, to surpass that impossibility, to dwell in our imagination. In Umberto Eco's opinion, the only place where this is possible is fiction. In order to understand stories I need to construct their architecture and at the same time, in order to understand architecture I need to place a story in it. In this film the project pursues the desire for an animate architecture. Like the impossible desire of the would-be lovers in the play The Malady of Death by Marguerite Duras, this desire also proves impossible; the architecture is found in that impossibility. The movie has to suffer from the same malady of impossible yearning. This film is a lazy machine---asking the viewer to construct the space of the narrative.* *This dissertation includes a CD that is compound (contains both a paper copy and a CD as part of the dissertation). The CD requires the following applications: Windows Media Player.
Citation: Nikolov, Nikolai Panteleev. (2002) ""Every text, after all, is a lazy machine asking the reader to do some of its work. What a problem it would be if a text were to say everything the receiver is to understand - it would never end." Umberto Eco, Six Walks in the Fictional Woods." Masters Thesis, Rice University. http://hdl.handle.net/1911/17567.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1911/17567
Date: 2002

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